Lienhard School of Nursing “Admits” Harvey, A Lifelike Cardiovascular Simulator

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing now has a permanent patient on staff. The school is the recipient of “Harvey,” a cardiopulmonary patient simulator, thanks to an $87,500 grant from the Hugoton Foundation.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

LIENHARD SCHOOL OF NURSING “ADMITS” HARVEY, A LIFELIKE CARDIOVASCULAR SIMULATOR

NEW YORK, NY, May 14, 2010 – Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing now has a permanent patient on staff. The school is the recipient of “Harvey,” a cardiopulmonary patient simulator, thanks to an $87,500 grant from the Hugoton Foundation.

He’s not human, but Harvey is no dummy. He simulates 30 cardiac diseases with realistic heart and lung sounds at the touch of a button. He can be programmed to have various conditions that students diagnose and treat, such as hypertension, angina, myocardial infarct (“heart attack”), mitral valve prolapse, or a ventricular septal defect (“a hole in the heart”).

Harvey allows Pace University nursing students to practice their bedside diagnostic skills as often as they wish on him – and build confidence along the way. Increasingly nursing schools are turning to patient simulators to train students so they can practice on mannequins without fear of making fatal mistakes. The American College of Cardiology Task Force on Teaching recommends Harvey for training.

Although Harvey turned 42 this year, he is better than ever. The first Harvey simulators were heavy, weighing over 700 pounds. With his countless health issues he has helped train thousands of health care professionals at over 140 medical centers worldwide. With the trend toward shorter hospital stays, nursing students benefit from the continual presence of a patient who tolerates constant treatment and prodding.

The new slim, trim Harvey, weighing just 90 pounds, has undergone quite a few changes since he came on the scene in 1968. Harvey used to have a system of cams and levers that drove pistons to simulate his heartbeat and pulse. Today digital technology regulates Harvey’s heartbeat and pulse. With the addition of abnormal breath sounds, Harvey can now simulate a variety of pulmonary diseases. The newer Harvey also simulates additional cardiac disease states, has the ability to speak, and an interactive link to a multimedia computer curriculum in cardiology. The creators believe that Harvey will do for lung disease simulation what he already did for cardiac disease training.

According to dean and professor Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, “Harvey’s computer controlled simulation allows our advanced practice and entry-level nursing students to learn, practice and repeat procedures before performing them on real patients. Our students will get evidence-based learning experiences that are deeply meaningful while at the same time realistic and safe.”

Feldman noted that technology has transformed nursing education at Lienhard over the years and that Harvey will be in good company with a growing Lienhard family of several other patient simulators at Pace, along with equipment commonly found in a critical care unit or Emergency Room (ER): patient monitor, respirator, 12 lead EKG machine, multi-line IV pumps and a crash cart complete with defibrillator. Pace’s “Vital Sim” simulators have heart and lung sounds, blood pressure, arterial oxygenation levels, and even cough and groan like a real patient. This makes for a highly realistic “patient encounter” in the safe environment of the Learning Resource Center. “We are hoping to continue expansion of simulation learning as the field, and our student population, have grown,” Feldman said.

Professor Joanne Singleton, PhD, will work with aspiring family nurse practitioners to help them hone their skills on Harvey. She said, “Harvey is truly a lifesaver; he will help the nurses of tomorrow learn or improve skills and effective teamwork behaviors that will prevent health care errors that compromise patient safety. Mistakes can be made safely on Harvey that will help students learn without any negative outcomes on real people. Students who work with Harvey can learn at their own pace and be less likely to make health care errors when it counts – in a real-life situation.”

Assistant Professor Lucille Ferrara, EdD, will use Harvey for a pilot study in fall 2010 with nurse practitioner students to compare teaching methods. The study will examine high-fidelity simulation-based assessment, delivered via Harvey, versus more traditional teaching tools such as case studies. Both student and teacher perspectives will be explored. The results of this study will be critical as faculty in the family nurse practitioner program plan to transition from teaching with case studies to teaching in a more hands-on way with high fidelity (Harvey) simulation-based clinical skills assessment.

About Pace University: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

###

Fulbright Winner Aims to Remove Barriers to Quality Healthcare in Bangladesh

With much debate regarding healthcare systems worldwide, John J. Ringhisen, RN, a graduate of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, will study cultural and social barriers that prevent access to primary health care as a recipient of a 2010-2011 Fulbright Research Grant to South and Central Asia, Bangladesh.

PACE UNIVERSITY FULBRIGHT WINNER AIMS TO REMOVE BARRIERS TO QUALITY HEALTHCARE IN BANGLADESH

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contacts: Cara Cea, 914-773-3312 or ccea@pace.edu;
Sharon Lewis, 914-773-3973 or slewis2@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY FULBRIGHT WINNER AIMS TO REMOVE BARRIERS TO QUALITY HEALTHCARE IN BANGLADESH

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, April 28, 2010 – With much debate regarding healthcare systems worldwide, John J. Ringhisen, RN, a graduate of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, will study cultural and social barriers that prevent access to primary health care as a recipient of a 2010-2011 Fulbright Research Grant to South and Central Asia, Bangladesh.

Ringhisen will volunteer his services in Dhaka, Bangladesh for nine months beginning in August, as a registered nurse/participant observer in local primary health care centers and the communities they serve. In this role, Ringhisen will interview community and public health officials to collect their opinions on what prevents their target groups from participating.

Ringhisen hopes to bring back some important lessons that can be applied to our healthcare system in the U.S. “Accessibility to healthcare is critical. More attention needs to be paid to rural and isolated populations. Instead of a healthcare clinic spending money on new equipment, perhaps door-to-door van service can be provided so families without any means of transportation can get the medical attention they need. I would advocate securing a grant to provide a ‘clinic on wheels’ that would come into the rural communities to help with basic healthcare needs such as vaccinations and wellness exams to avoid the potentially long travel time to healthcare facilities. There are existing programs that focus on specialties such as Outreach Mobile Eye Clinics (OMEC) out of Australia. Even more important, however, is to create a system of hard site clinics as logistical support hubs so that these mobile clinics can stay in the field longer, probe deeper into remote areas, and offer more emergent care if needed.”

The Wichita, KS native graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1999 with a bachelor of science degree in physics and minor in electrical engineering. Upon graduation, he received a commission as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army’s Finance Corps. John served in Seoul, South Korea and supported operations in Bosnia, Kosovo, and Iraq until his honorable discharge in 2003.

After working as an office manager and comptroller for several small businesses and a private dental practice, John realized his future in healthcare through Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing Combined Degree Program (CDP). In 2008 John was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation New Careers in Nursing Scholar. He graduated in December 2009 with a bachelor of science degree in Nursing and received his New York State Registered Professional Nursing License in March 2010.

Ringhisen interacted with patients from diverse backgrounds while working in the emergency room at Westchester Medical Center and with the Visiting Nurse Association of the Hudson Valley.

“John tells us he was inspired by the classes he took in the CDP, particularly those that focused on cultural competency in nursing,” said Lienhard dean Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN. “He was able to apply what he was learning about cultural competence in the classroom in a hands-on, practical way and wondered how other countries fared with their healthcare systems, especially those in the developing world.“

Ringhisen is learning Bengali and Hindi in preparation for his departure to Bangladesh. He also speaks intermediate Spanish and Arabic, and beginner Hangul (Korean).

Martha Greenberg, PhD, R.N., Associate Professor and Chairperson Undergraduate Nursing Studies, said, “From the first day of meeting him, John stood out as a leader among this peers. John is a decorated Veteran of the United States military. He is articulate, well read, a nursing scholar, kind and compassionate to his peers and colleagues, and a leader. He has a proven track record of adapting to different cultural environments having served in Iraq. Finally, he is committed to working with underserved people to improve their health and be a change agent not only abroad but locally, nationally and globally.”

According to Dr. Lillie M. Shortridge-Baggett, EdD, RN, FAAN “John is Lienhard School of Nursing’s second Fulbright scholar; our first is Patty Sayre, and both are exceptional students. We are very proud of their success.”

Ringhisen is married to the former Melissa Grider of Lombard, IL, a Major and a full time professor and scholarship advisor with the Department of Social Sciences at West Point. Ringhisen says, “She has two Rhodes Scholars, one East-West, two Truman Scholars, nine Rotary, and two National Science Foundation Scholars to mentor and assist with their own overseas studies. The joke in the house right now is whether or not she gets to ‘claim’ me as her one Fulbright Scholar since she helped with my application process.” The couple has two sons, John Patrick age 7 and Trevor Alfred age 3. While Ringhisen is in Bangladesh, his family will remain in the U.S., staying at West Point with an extensive support system.

About the Fulbright Program: The Fulbright program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the United States government and is designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the US and the people of other countries. The Fulbright program provides participants – chosen for their academic merit and leadership potential – with the opportunity to study, teach and conduct research, exchange ideas and contribute to finding solutions to shared international concerns.

About Pace University: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Future Nurses from Pace University Lobby Policymakers on Healthcare Issues

Nurses often speak out on behalf of their patients to ensure they get the best possible care, improving the lives of many people, one at a time. But nurses are also a powerful group when they get together to advocate on the local and national level to improve the healthcare system for all of us.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts: Cara Cea, 914-773-3312 or ccea@pace.edu; Sharon Lewis, 914-773-3973 or slewis2@pace.edu

FUTURE NURSES FROM PACE UNIVERSITY LOBBY POLICYMAKERS ON HEALTHCARE ISSUES

Urge State Legislature to support nursing education, safe staffing ratios, punish violence against nurses, and require safe patient handling policies. Photos available upon request.

Albany, New York, April 21, 2010 — Nurses often speak out on behalf of their patients to ensure they get the best possible care, improving the lives of many people, one at a time. But nurses are also a powerful group when they get together to advocate on the local and national level to improve the healthcare system for all of us.

That was an important lesson that senior Amanda Schultz, along with about 50 other students from Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, learned yesterday, when they attended the New York State Nurses Association‘s (NYSNA) annual Lobby Day at the State Capitol in Albany, taking part in public policy discussions with legislators and their aides. Lienhard students had the opportunity to meet with Assembly Members Robert Castelli and Deborah Glick, and aides for Assembly Member Jonathan Bing, Senators Andrea Stewart-Cousins, Suzi Oppenheimer, and Daniel Squadron.

The students talked with their legislators about a range of issues, from violence against nurses to safe staffing ratios to funding for nursing education programs. Schultz was particularly concerned about the issue of safety in the workplace. She said, “Statistics are stunning. According to the Department of Justice, nearly 500,000 nurses per year are victims of violent crimes in the workplace. When I am a full time nurse next year, the last thing I want to have to deal with is a violent patient. The proper protections need to be in place to keep nurses safe.”

NYSNA has written a memo of support for a bill that would add attacks on RNs or LPNs to the same class of assault as attacks on police officers, firefighters, and EMTs. The memo says that the frequency with which nurses are assaulted has led to an accepted and inappropriate belief that violence is to be expected in a healthcare environment and should be considered “part of the job.”

Lienhard School of Nursing students were accompanied to Albany by two of their faculty — Assistant Professor Andrea Sonenberg, NP, CNM, DNSc, and Clinical Instructor Ann Marie Bova, MSN, RN.

In addition to addressing violence against nurses, the students and their faculty are also advocating for safe staffing ratios, which result in safer care with improved patient outcomes, an improved workplace environment that will attract and retain nurses, and higher job satisfaction for nurses.

“I support the Safe Staffing for Quality Care Act,” said Sonenberg, who has been practicing for 24 years. “In my experience, an appropriate staff assignment, taking into account not just number of patients but acuity as well, results in better patient outcomes and satisfaction. Additionally, nurse satisfaction and retention are more likely to be optimal. If we don’t address this issue, the nursing shortage will only become more acute and a risk to patient safety.”

Nurses and future nurses are also advocating on measures affecting education of nurses. Proposed legislation would require registered professional nurses to attain bachelor’s degrees in nursing within ten years of their initial licensure. The legislation is modeled after an education requirement for public school teachers in New York State to earn a master’s within five years of initial certification. Bachelor’s degree programs provide additional emphasis on key areas of nursing theory and the use of evidence-based practice in nursing, according to NYSNA. Furthermore, BSN students are exposed to settings and areas of practice that are not generally part of associate degree programs, such as public health, home care, and various outpatient settings. The BSN curriculum also provides students with leadership skills that help them supervise and monitor dependent practitioners. According to Dean and Professor Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, “Nurses are lifelong learners, and every nurse should have a bachelor’s degree at a minimum. Although an associate degree provides a beginning foundation for practice, the evidence supports that there are fewer patient errors in health care environments that have a predominance of BS nurses, and patient safety is a high priority in patient care.”

According to Raymond Ng, president of Student Nurses at Pace (SNAP) on the New York City campus of Pace University, “Lobby Day really opened my eyes to how nurses can influence policy to improve care. I feel so empowered and energized from this experience; we talked to our policymakers, and they really listened.”

This Lobby Day event was organized by NYSNA, and approximately 2,200 nurses and future nurses attended. Professor Sonenberg said, “Advocacy is a critical process when it comes to improving our health care system, and as both current and future nurses, we are uniquely positioned to inform legislators on critical issues affecting the nation’s health and have a professional responsibility to make our voices heard.” Bova agreed saying, “This is an excellent learning experience for both the legislators and the students, and the result will be a more educated electorate and healthcare improvements.”

About Pace University: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Health Care Experts Weigh in on Reform Debate and New Cancer Screening Guidelines

Primary care nurses and nurse educators at Pace University’s rapidly-growing Lienhard School of Nursing have informed views on the current news about healthcare reform and guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Sharon Lewis, Lienhard School of Nursing, (914) 773-3973, slewis2@pace.edu Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

EXPERT NURSES AVAILABLE TO COMMENT ON WAYS TO INCREASE PRIMARY CARE IN FEDERAL HEALTH CARE REFORM

AND NEW CANCER SCREENING GUIDELINES

Nurse practitioners best group to handle increasing need for primary care, says dean of nursing school; Nursing practice should not change yet, say Pace University experts

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, December 2009 – Primary care nurses and nurse educators at Pace University’s rapidly-growing Lienhard School of Nursing have informed views on the current news about healthcare reform and guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening.

All can be reached directly at the numbers below as well as through media contacts above.

Nurse practitioners are ready to meet increased demand for primary care: Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN

Dean of the Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University, Feldman has emerged as a national authority on three major trends that are changing the nursing profession – the shortage of nurses and nurse educators, the involvement of nurses in promoting health policy, and the promotion of evidence-based procedures in education and nursing practice. With a PhD in nursing science from New York University, she has published more than 90 books, chapters and articles and testified before Congress. Her school’s enrollment is up this fall by about 80 students, the fourth year with such an increase; in recent years the school has been awarded over $5 million in federal and private grants. Lienhard’s Family Nurse Practitioner Program is ranked ninth nationally in the U.S. News & World Report survey of “America’s Best Graduate Schools 2008;” last year the school added a doctor of nursing practice program. Feldman is on US Representative Nita Lowey’s (D-NY) Health Advisory Committee and a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and of the New York Academy of Medicine. Feldman is also the 2009 chair of the Board of Commissioners of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), the national nonprofit agency that exclusively accredits baccalaureate and higher degree programs in nursing.

Feldman says: “A major tenet of the proposed Health Care Reform legislation is to expand primary care delivery to focus on health promotion and maintenance and the management of chronic illness. The current plan very properly envisions using nurse practitioners to meet the increasing need and I cannot think of a more appropriate group of professionals.

With a focus on preventive care, nurse practitioners have been delivering primary care in a variety of inpatient, outpatient, and community settings in for over 40 years. While primary care physicians’ numbers are down 30%, the number of programs preparing nurse practitioners has been increasing annually in recent years to meet growing demand and expand the nursing workforce. There are now 323 programs that prepare students to join the workforce of 2.9 million nurse practitioners.” Nurse practitioners are registered nurses with advanced preparation and qualified to prescribe medication.

Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN Dean and Professor, Pace University Lienhard School of Nursing Interim Dean, School of Education Phone: (914)-773-3342 Fax: (914)-773-3480 Email: hfeldman@pace.edu

Don’t move too fast: Andrea Sonenberg, NP, CNM, DNSc

Assistant Professor Andrea Sonenberg, a nurse practitioner and certified nurse midwife with a doctorate from Columbia, is an expert in women’s health and in the regulation of advanced nursing practice and global use of Advanced-Practice Nurses (APNs) for vulnerable populations.

Sonenberg thinks it would be premature for APNs to change their cancer screening practices yet. She also recognizes that throughout history, periodic changes in guidelines for breast self-examination and the use of PAP smears have taken place as new evidence was uncovered and weighed by expert panels and organizations, and that these changes are always informed by dialogues beginning prior to their announcements.

She stresses that recommendations that may be made by the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) will be directed at routine screening schedules for low risk women. “Each provider must determine a client’s risk individually,” Sonenberg says.

She adds: “The fact that the USPSTF has a different membership than it did when the previous recommendations were made seven years ago is less relevant, in my view, than the fact that there is new evidence on which to base revised recommendations.”

On health care reform: “I would also like to caution against trying to link these new recommendations to the health care reform debate. I believe the timing is coincidental. Review of evidence by USPSTF is ongoing. Some believe that these recommendations are meant to save money for insurance companies, and therefore the health care system on the whole. It worries me that this belief could spread and lead us down a dangerous path regarding primary care and prevention.”

Andrea Sonenberg, NP, CNM, DNSc Assistant Professor, Pace University Lienhard School of Nursing 861 Bedford Road Pleasantville, New York 10570 Phone: (914) 773-3534 Fax: (914) 773-3345 E-mail: asonenberg@pace.edu

Still recommending mammograms: Audrey Hoover, MS, RN, FNP, WHNP

Audrey Hoover, MS, RN, FNP, WHNP, a family nurse practitioner who specializes in family and women’s health, is also taking a cautious approach to breast cancer screening and will carefully weigh all the information before changing her practice. She says, “This is very new data…. we are continuing to recommend mammograms for women at 40.”

Regarding PAP smears, Hoover recalls the overzealous screening and treatment of adolescents a few years ago that turned out to be unnecessary. Human papillomavirus (HPV) may increase the risk for cervical cancer and for abnormal PAP smears in certain women, depending on age. “We now know that he HPV virus tends to clear by about age 26,” says Hoover. “Early data analysis on the virus and recommendations on the treatment for it were premature.” Hoover is considering recommending new American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologist guidelines for PAP smears every two years starting at age 21, and every three years after age 30 for women who have had three consecutive negative PAP smears.

Hoover is associate director of University Health Care at Pace University which offers a full range of primary care services to the Pace community.

Audrey P. Hoover, FNP Family Nurse Practitioner and Associate Director Pace University Health Care NY Campus 41 Park Row, Rm 313 New York, NY 10038 Phone: 212 346-1600 Fax: 212 348-1308 E-mail: ahoover@pace.edu

About Pace University: For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Rep. Nita Lowey to be Honored Monday With Pace’s Dean Feldman for Leadership in Nursing Education

Monday, January 23 at 10:45 am, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) will honor Congresswoman Nita Lowey in her White Plains district office to recognize her outstanding leadership on behalf of nursing education and research.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact:
Cara Halstead Cea, Public Information, Pace University
914-773-3313 (Office), 914-906-9680 (Cell) chalstead@pace.edu

CONGRESSWOMAN NITA LOWEY TO BE HONORED MONDAY
FOR LEADERSHIP ON BEHALF OF NURSING EDUCATION AND RESEARCH

Editors’ note: Lowey will be available for questions and photos after the ceremony.

WHAT: Monday, January 23 at 10:45 am, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) will honor Congresswoman Nita Lowey in her White Plains district office to recognize her outstanding leadership on behalf of nursing education and research.

Also honored will be Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, Dean of the Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University in New York, who is receiving the “Grassroots Star” award from AACN for grassroots advocacy to solve the nationwide nursing and nursing faculty shortage.

WHEN: Monday, January 23 at 10:45am
WHERE: Lowey’s district office, 222 Mamaroneck Ave., Suite 310, White Plains, NY 10605, 914-428-1707

Potential issues for discussion
The latest developments in New York State regarding nursing education and the nursing shortage are expected to be discussed by Lowey and the nursing administrators and faculty members at the event is Part of this discussion will likely include the NEED Act, which is legislation that would help nursing schools nationwide expand their enrollments and resolve the national nursing shortage. (See attached file: Bill Summary.doc for more information on the NEED Act.) Lowey is on the Appropriations Subcommittee of Labor Health Human Services and Education and may be asked questions about funding for health and education programs next year.

Lowey also is interested in a variety of health and human services issues such as pandemic flu, food allergies, disaster preparedness, school safety, the environment, nuclear power, as well as the nursing shortage.
Lowey has worked to secure funding for nursing education, in New York State and nationwide, through her seat on the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Subcommittee as well as through the introduction of the Nurse Education, Expansion, and Development (NEED) Act with colleagues Lois Capps and Peter King.
Presenting the award to Lowey on behalf of AACN will be Feldman and Glenda Kelman, Ph.D., Chair of the Department of Nursing at Sage College in Albany.
Set within culturally diverse urban and suburban settings, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing (LSN) is committed to innovation and excellence in education, research, and practice in primary health care. With more than 600 students enrolled in baccalaureate and master’s degree programs, all approved by the New York State Education Department and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, LSN partners with communities to foster human growth and dignity and provide primary care. The School of Nursing is devoted to preparing individuals, families, and communities at local, national, and international levels, to meet health care demands now and in the future. For inquiries about the nursing programs at Pace, please email nursing@pace.edu, or call (914) 773-3552.
Founded in 1906, Pace University educates achievers who are engaged with critical issues both locally and globally. Known for its outcome-oriented environment that prepares students to succeed in a wide-range of professions, Pace has three campuses, including New York City (downtown and lower Manhattan), Westchester (Pleasantville, Briarcliff, and the White Plains Graduate Center), and the Pace School of Law in White Plains. The Pace Hudson Valley Center is located in Orange County New York. A private metropolitan university, Pace enrolls more than 14,000 students in undergraduate, masters, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Ivan G. Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, and School of Education. Visit Pace University at www.pace.edu.

Korean Graduate Students, Faculty to Attend Conference On Public Health Issues at Pace University, July 24-28

Graduate students and faculty from Kyungsan University in Kyungbuk, Korea, will take part in a five-day conference at Pace University to learn how the United States addresses issues surrounding public health and long term care. The second annual conference, organized and implemented by the Department of Public Administration’s Center for Health Care Policy Education and Research at Pace University, will be held July 24-28 at the Lubin Graduate Center, White Plains.

Contact: Public Affairs
(914) 923-2798 (914) 923-2798
News@Pace.Edu

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. – Graduate students and faculty from Kyungsan University in Kyungbuk, Korea, will take part in a five-day conference at Pace University to learn how the United States addresses issues surrounding public health and long term care. The second annual conference, organized and implemented by the Department of Public Administration’s Center for Health Care Policy Education and Research at Pace University, will be held July 24-28 at the Lubin Graduate Center, White Plains.

Joshua Lipsman, M.D., the newly appointed Commissioner of Health for Westchester County, will open the conference with an overview of public health services. Other speakers include Patricia Doyle, director of alcohol and substance abuse services, Westchester County Department of Community Mental Health; David Martin, director, American Lung Association; Laura Bolotsky, program administrator, Westchester County Office for the Aging; Karen Propper, senior vice president, Amsterdam Nursing Home; Edward F. Leonard, executive vice president, White Plains Hospital Center; and Regina M. Kelly, vice president for ambulatory care, Blythedale Children’s Hospital.

Conference topics include Public Health Policy and Implementation in Food Safety; Public Health Issues in Alcohol and Substance Abuse Treatment; The Role of Private Advocacy Groups in Public Health; Politics and Public Health; Nursing Home Services; Adult Day Health Care Programs; Community Based Aging Services; Community Based Hospice Care; Psychiatric Care; Services for Mental Retardation and Developmental Disability; Hospitals and Acute Care; Hospital-Based Home Health Care; Children’s Health Care Issues; and School Health Issues.

Participants will also make site visits to New York health care facilities including the White Plains Hospital Center, the Westchester Medical Center in Valhalla, and the Amsterdam Nursing Home in New York City.

Pace University’s Center for Health Care Education and Research was founded in 1996 by the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences Department of Public Administration in order to advance health care policy education and research activities at Pace University and to assist health care providers in meeting the needs of the community.

Pace Law School Conference to Address Managed Care, Patients’ Rights and Access to Health Care, April 6

Capitol Hill remains deadlocked on proposed legislation to create a patient’s bill of rights. Two bills approved by the House and the Senate differ greatly in their provisions for patients’ ability to sue HMOs for damages when they are improperly denied health care. Pace Law School will host its fourth annual Health Law and Policy Conference to address these and other legal issues surrounding health care access. The program, “Patients’ Rights, Managed Care and Expanding Access to Acute, Chronic and Long-Term Health Care,” will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 6, on the School’s White Plains, N.Y., campus at 78 North Broadway.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637

Contact: Alta Levat
(914) 422-4128
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. – Capitol Hill remains deadlocked on proposed legislation to create a patient’s bill of rights. Two bills approved by the House and the Senate differ greatly in their provisions for patients’ ability to sue HMOs for damages when they are improperly denied health care. Pace Law School will host its fourth annual Health Law and Policy Conference to address these and other legal issues surrounding health care access. The program, “Patients’ Rights, Managed Care and Expanding Access to Acute, Chronic and Long-Term Health Care,” will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 6, on the School’s White Plains, N.Y., campus at 78 North Broadway.

“While managed care is here to stay, Congress’ failure to ensure access, accountability and quality in health care means that large numbers of people across the political and economic spectrum are highly dissatisfied with the present health care system,” said Professor Linda Fentiman, Director of the Health Law and Policy Program at Pace Law School. “The Pace program will explore initiatives in litigation and legislation designed to break the current stalemate and ensure access to appropriate medical treatment for all, in both the acute and long-term care settings.”

Speakers will include Thomas Perez, Esq., Director of the Office of Civil Rights, United States Department of Health and Human Services, who will talk about “Ensuring Health Care Access for Racial and Ethnic Minorities”; Stephanie Kanwit, Esq., of Epstein Becker & Green in Washington, D.C., who was recently featured on CBS’ “60 Minutes” discussing legal challenges to managed care, will address “New Theories of Physician and HMO Liability”; and Margaret Farrell, Esq., of Cohen, Milstein, Hausfeld & Toll, will discuss lawsuits against HMOs from the injured plaintiff’s point of view.

Other speakers from government, the private sector and academia will discuss state efforts to increase access and accountability in health care decisions and the complex interaction of federal and state reform initiatives. Topics include “Federal and State Reforms to Improve Health Care Quality and Access,” “The Impact of Innovations in Health Care Delivery on Access to Chronic and Long-Term Care” and “How the New Prospective Payment System will Affect Services for the Elderly and the Chronically Ill.”

To register for the conference or for more information, call Aisha Reyes at (914) 422-4062 or Kathy Lambert at (914) 422-4223. Continuing Legal Education Credit is available. Cost of attendance is $139 for one session, $199 for both morning and afternoon sessions. The conference is sponsored by Pace Law School’s Health Law and Policy Program and its Center for Continuing Legal Education.

Founded in 1976, Pace Law School has nearly 5,000 graduates throughout the country. It offers full-time and part-time day and evening J.D. programs on its White Plains, New York, campus. The Law School, which has one of the nation’s top-rated environmental law programs, offers the master of laws and the doctor of juridical science degrees in that field. The School also offers the LL.M. in Comparative Legal Studies. Beginning in the fall of 2000, Pace Law School will begin offering online courses in health law to attorneys around the nation. The Law School is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent and diversified University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County.