Dean Feldman Named Chair of National Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education

At a time of enormous demand for nurses, Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, a Bellmore, NY resident and dean of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing since 1993, has been re-elected the 2009 chair of the Board of Commissioners of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), the national nonprofit agency that exclusively accredits baccalaureate and higher degree programs in nursing.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Halstead Cea, Public Information, Pace University 914-773-3312 (Office), 914-906-9680 (Cell) chalstead@pace.edu

Photo editors: a 300 dpi jpeg head shot of Dean Feldman and photographs of her with students are available through Cara Halstead Cea (above).

Influential role for influential dean DEAN OF PACE UNIVERSITY’S LIENHARD SCHOOL OF NURSING NAMED CHAIR OF NATIONAL COMMISSION ON COLLEGIATE NURSING EDUCATION

Harriet R. Feldman also gets accepted to Harvard program

NEW YORK, NY – At a time of enormous demand for nurses, Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, a Bellmore, NY resident and dean of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing since 1993, has been re-elected the 2009 chair of the Board of Commissioners of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), the national nonprofit agency that exclusively accredits baccalaureate and higher degree programs in nursing.

She has also been chosen as a member of Harvard’s Institute for Management and Leadership in Education (MLE) Class of 2009 to be held from June 14–26, 2009.

During Feldman’s leadership of the organization, CCNE has: • Amended the standards for accreditation of baccalaureate and graduate degree nursing programs to address baccalaureate and master’s degree nursing programs, as well as Doctor of Nursing Practice programs. • Trained a cadre of over 100 new on-site evaluators to serve as volunteer peer reviewers in the CCNE accreditation process. • Participated as an organizational member in the advanced practice nursing consensus work group and endorsed the resulting consensus model for advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) regulation which includes licensure, accreditation, certification and education. • Amended the procedures for accreditation of baccalaureate and graduate degree nursing programs to address baccalaureate and master’s degree nursing programs, as well as Doctor of Nursing Practice programs. • Re-trained all active CCNE evaluators to the amended Standards and Procedures.

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing is among the first institutions in the nation to receive funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) through the RWJF New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program. Grants provided through this program are being used to increase the number of students enrolled in Lienhard’s accelerated baccalaureate nursing program, the Combined Degree Program (CDP). This national initiative, launched by RWJF and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), aims to help alleviate the nation’s nursing shortage by dramatically expanding the pipeline of students in accelerated nursing programs. The LSN received a $120,000 grant that will allow the school to award twelve scholarships of $10,000 each to students who are “underrepresented” in nursing and enroll in the CDP in spring 2009.

Bottlenecks and politics. Feldman is emerging as a national authority on three major trends that are changing the nursing profession – the shortage of nurses and nurse educators, the involvement of nurses in promoting health policy, and the promotion of evidence-based procedures in education and nursing practice.

Feldman has published more than 90 books, book chapters, refereed journal articles, and editorials that have focused on leadership, the nursing and faculty shortages, the role of nurses in the political arena, and evidence-based practice. She has especially spoken out on the nursing shortage and the bottleneck to educating more nurses that is being created by a parallel shortage of nursing faculty members.

Under her direction, the Lienhard School was a leader in a consortium of health-related institutions in New York’s Hudson Valley that in 2005 won a $1.03 million US Labor Department grant to help open that bottleneck. The funds provide monetary credits to healthcare facilities in exchange for loaning Master’s-prepared nurses to teach clinical courses, thereby making it possible to enroll greater numbers of nursing students

Partly as a result, the Lienhard School’s enrollment is up this fall by about 70 students, the fourth year with such an increase. Lienhard’s Family Nurse Practitioner Program is ranked ninth nationally in the U.S. News & World Report survey of “America’s Best Graduate Schools 2008.” Building on this reputation, the Lienhard School started a new Doctor of Nursing Practice program in September 2008 to address the need for practitioners with the most advanced level of clinical nursing practice in which they will design, implement, evaluate and continuously improve health care delivery and outcomes.

Feldman has testified in Congress and written numerous articles and letters to editors on nursing policy, becoming a nationally known figure both within her field and in the media. For her legislative work in addressing the shortage, she received the “STAR” award for grassroots political advocacy from the Association of American Colleges of Nursing.

Prized books. In the last six years, Feldman has edited four award-winning books. “Nurses in the Political Arena: The Public Face of Nursing” (2000), with Sandra Lewenson, EdD, RN, FAAN received an American Journal of Nursing (AJN) Book of the Year award and a Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Print Media Award. That was soon followed by “The Nursing Shortage: Strategies for Recruitment and Retention in Clinical Practice and Education” (2003), “Educating Nurses for Leadership” (2005, with Martha J. Greenberg, PhD, RN), and “Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing” (2006, with Rona F. Levin, PhD, RN), all three of which also received AJN Book of the Year awards.

Feldman is on US Representative Nita Lowey’s (D-NY) Health Advisory Committee and an active emeritus member on the board of Nurses Educational Fund, Inc. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, and past editor of the journals Nursing Leadership Forum and Scholarly Inquiry for Nursing Practice.

She received her BS and MS degrees in nursing from Adelphi University and her PhD in nursing science from New York University.

About Pace. For 101 years Pace University has combined exceptional academics with professional experiences and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York enrolling more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Lienhard School Wins Nearly $1 Million to Enhance New Nursing Doctoral Program

At a time when the US population is increasingly diverse and quality patient outcomes and patient safety are hot topics in health care, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing has won a three-year federal grant of nearly $1 million to enhance its new doctoral program in the areas of cultural competence and evidence-based practice.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Halstead Cea, 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu or Joanne K. Singleton, PhD, 212-346-1903, jsingleton@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF NURSING WINS FEDERAL GRANT OF NEARLY $1 MILLION TO ENHANCE TRAINING IN MULTICULTURAL ISSUES, PRACTICES BASED ON RESEARCH $900,439 grant from U.S.

Department of Health and Human Services will deepen new doctoral program’s emphasis on primary care for underserved populations

NEW YORK, NY – At a time when the US population is increasingly diverse and quality patient outcomes and patient safety are hot topics in health care, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing has won a three-year federal grant of nearly $1 million to enhance its new doctoral program in the areas of cultural competence and evidence-based practice.

According to Lienhard Dean Harriet R. Feldman, the changes will help keep Lienhard “a step ahead of the rest” in the burgeoning national effort to make sure students are prepared to address the needs of diverse populations using the best available evidence. The award comes from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under its Advanced Education Nursing Grant program. The grant will help provide curriculum enhancements for the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program that Lienhard announced this spring.

The enhancements will focus on increasing student and faculty expertise in the areas of cultural competence and evidence-based practice improvement. The DNP program is intended to educate students’ to reach the highest level of clinical practice in nursing. Currently, all enrolled students are Family Nurse Practitioners (FNPs). The first class of 24 enters this fall. Lienhard’s FNP program is ranked ninth in the nation by US News & World Report.

Both DNP faculty members and students will get additional training in cultural awareness and sensitivity, producing what has come to be known as “cultural competence.”

Instruction will expand in delivering primary care that draws on scientific evidence, one aspect of “evidence-based practice,” or EBP.

The training will focus especially on vulnerable groups. Feldman co-edited a recent book on the subject with Lienhard graduate chair, Rona F. Levin, “EBP is based on the idea that nurses can contribute to the development of a scientific base for nursing practice by critiquing and questioning standard guidelines, treatments and outcomes. It empowers nurses on the front lines to fix problems.”

Team leaders. National healthcare accrediting bodies including The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and The Joint Commission are urging healthcare organizations to assess their capacity to meet patients’ cultural needs not only with training, but with such care components as language services, religious and spiritual care, and special diets.

“This focus of this grant will help distinguish our Doctor of Nursing Practice program from the others. And the skills of cultural competence and evidence-based practice are what employers tell us they are looking for,” said Feldman.

Added Joanne K. Singleton, Ph.D., the Director of the FNP-DNP program and the Project Director for the grant, “Our students will be challenged to learn how to design, deliver and lead interdisciplinary primary health care teams in developing and implementing culturally-competent best practices. We expect our graduates to make significant contributions to the overall health of our nation, which will include addressing national health disparities.”

About the Lienhard School of Nursing: With classrooms and laboratories in culturally diverse urban and suburban settings, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing is committed to innovation and excellence in education, research, and practice in primary health care. It has nearly doubled in size over the last five years, and now has more than 700 students enrolled in baccalaureate and master’s degree programs, all approved by the New York State Education Department and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. Lienhard partners with communities to foster human growth and dignity and provide primary care, and is devoted to preparing individuals, families, and communities at local, national, and international levels to meet health care demands now and in the future. Professional education at Pace University: Since 1906 Pace University has offered professional education that combines liberal arts with practical experience and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York. It enrolls more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Lienhard’s Dean Feldman Named Chair of Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education and Honored at NYU

At a time of enormous demand for nurses, Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, a Bellmore, NY resident and dean of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing since 1993, has been elected the 2008 chair of the Board of Commissioners of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, the national nonprofit agency that exclusively accredits baccalaureate and higher degree programs in nursing.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Cara Halstead Cea, Public Information, Pace University
914-773-3312 (Office), 914-906-9680 (Cell) chalstead@pace.edu

Influential role for influential dean
DEAN OF PACE UNIVERSITY’S LIENHARD SCHOOL OF NURSING
NAMED CHAIR OF NATIONAL NURSING ACCREDITATION COMMISSION

Harriet R. Feldman also receives Grace E. Davidson award from NYU School of Nursing

NEW YORK, NY, November 29, 2007 – At a time of enormous demand for nurses, Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, a Bellmore, NY resident and dean of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing since 1993, has been elected the 2008 chair of the Board of Commissioners of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, the national nonprofit agency that exclusively accredits baccalaureate and higher degree programs in nursing.

She also was honored this month at her alma mater, New York University, with this year’s Grace E. Davidson award. The award recognizes outstanding contributions of nursing administrators to the education of nursing students.

“At a time when enormous demand for nurses could create temptations to cut corners on preparing the next generation of nurses, accreditation of nursing programs to serve the public interest is more vital than ever,” said Feldman. “I am pleased to be a member of this panel of individuals who broadly represent the interests of educators, deans, practitioners, employers, and community members.”

Bottlenecks and politics. Feldman is emerging as a national authority on three major trends that are changing the nursing profession – the shortage of nurses and nurse educators, the involvement of nurses in promoting health policy, and the promotion of evidence-based procedures in education and nursing practice.

Feldman has published more than 90 books, book chapters, refereed journal articles, and editorials that have focused on leadership, the nursing and faculty shortages, the role of nurses in the political arena, and evidence-based practice. She has especially spoken out on the nursing shortage and the bottleneck to educating more nurses that is being created by a parallel shortage of nursing faculty members.

Under her direction, the Lienhard School was a leader in a consortium of health-related institutions in New York’s Hudson Valley that in 2005 won a $1.03 million US Labor Department grant to help open that bottleneck. The funds provide monetary credits to healthcare facilities in exchange for loaning Master’s-prepared nurses to teach clinical courses, thereby making it possible to enroll greater numbers of nursing students

Partly as a result, the Lienhard School’s enrollment is up this fall by about 70 students, the fourth year with such an increase. Lienhard’s Family Nurse Practitioner Program is ranked ninth nationally in the U.S. News & World Report survey of “America’s Best Graduate Schools 2008.”
Building on this reputation, the Lienhard School received official word last week from New York State that its new Doctor of Nursing Practice program has been approved.

Feldman has testified in Congress and written numerous articles and letters to editors on nursing policy, becoming a nationally known figure both within her field and in the media. For her legislative work in addressing the shortage, she received the “STAR” award for grassroots political advocacy from the Association of American Colleges of Nursing.

Prized books. In the last six years, Feldman has edited four award-winning books. “Nurses in the Political Arena: The Public Face of Nursing” (2000), with Sandra Lewenson, EdD, RN, FAAN received an American Journal of Nursing (AJN) Book of the Year award and a Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Print Media Award. That was soon followed by “The Nursing Shortage: Strategies for Recruitment and Retention in Clinical Practice and Education” (2003), “Educating Nurses for Leadership” (2005, with Martha J. Greenberg, PhD, RN), and “Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing” (2006, with Rona F. Levin, PhD, RN), all three of which also received AJN Book of the Year awards.

Feldman is on US Representative Nita Lowey’s (D-NY) Health Advisory Committee and on the board of Nurses Educational Fund, Inc. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, and past editor of the journals Nursing Leadership Forum and Scholarly Inquiry for Nursing Practice.

She received her BS and MS degrees in nursing from Adelphi University and her PhD in nursing science from New York University.

About Pace. For 101 years Pace University has combined exceptional academics with professional experiences and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York enrolling more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

News source: Debate on advertising’s role in obesity, health and wellness

Paul Kurnit, clinical professor of marketing at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York, has forceful views and diverse experience in the youth marketplace.

October 30, 2007

Contact Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

NEWS SOURCE

Topic: Debate on advertising’s role in obesity, health and wellness

Debates are raging about the role of advertising in obesity, age appropriate messaging and over commercialization of youth.

For example, Senators Sam Brownback and Tom Harkin, along with FCC Chairman Kevin Martin and FCC Commissioners Michael J. Copps and Deborah Taylor Tate, announced the formation of a Task Force on Media and Childhood Obesity to examine the impact of media and advertising on children’s health. According to an article on Broadcasting & Cable online, 9/19/2007, the report from the task force has been “apparently held up by the inability to get children’s activist groups to sign off on it.” http://www.broadcastingcable.com/article/CA6479807.html?rssid=193

Paul Kurnit, clinical professor of marketing at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York, has forceful views and diverse experience in the youth marketplace. As a senior executive in the advertising business as President of Griffin Bacal, a DDB agency, he helped build the Hasbro toy and entertainment business and supervised TV programs like Transformers, GI Joe and My Little Pony. In addition to teaching at Pace, he operates his own marketing and consulting businesses, Kurnit Communications and KidShop. He also has worked extensively on “pro-social” initiatives to help young people including youth volunteerism for America’s Promise, founded by Colin Powell, The Partnership for a Drug-Free America, and the Charles and Helen Schwab Foundation’s programs for students with learning difficulties. He serves on the Creative Review Committee of The Advertising Council, the board of directors of the Advertising Educational Foundation and the advisory board of the Children’s Advertising Review Unit.

Professor Kurnit’s views on the role of advertising in obesity:

“Many who criticize advertising to kids misplace blame and oversimplify complex societal issues requiring much more comprehensive solutions to foster youth health and well-being. There has been no link demonstrated between advertising and obesity. Advertising plays a positive role in socializing kids. And, advertising is an important engine for quality entertainment and communication that nurture and nourish kids.”

Contrary to what anti-marketing groups maintain, “I haven’t seen any conclusive data that show kids are damaged by advertising. We live in a commercial world. The issue is to make advertising as responsive and responsible as possible rather than to turn our back on the commercial world we live in. The big opportunity is to harness the power of advertising to encourage positive social movements that will support a future of healthier kids and families.”

Phone: (914) 737-0300; email: pkurnit@pace.edu .

Pace University Study Finds Pomegranate Effective in Fighting Viruses and Bacteria

If the answer to improved health through protection against common germs and pathogens was as simple as drinking pomegranate juice it seems everyone would be a lot healthier.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Cara Halstead, Public Information Officer, Pace University
914-773-3312 Office, 914-906-9680 Cell, chalstead@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY STUDY FINDS PURE POMEGRANATE JUICE AND POMEGRANATE LIQUID EXTRACT EFFECTIVE IN FIGHTING VIRUSES AND BACTERIA

100% Pomegranate juice and POMx liquid extract could significantly reduce microbes found in the mouth that commonly cause cavities, staph infections and food poisoning

NEW YORK, NY, May 22, 2007 – If the answer to improved health through protection against common germs and pathogens was as simple as drinking pomegranate juice it seems everyone would be a lot healthier.

Recent preliminary research by Milton Schiffenbauer, Ph.D., a biology professor at Pace University in New York, indicates it just might be that simple. The research revealed that 100% pomegranate juice and POMx liquid extract (pomegranate polyphenol extract), made from the Wonderful variety of pomegranate grown in California, have antiviral and antibiotic effects. His findings will be introduced May 22 at the American Society for Microbiology’s annual meeting in Toronto in a presentation entitled: “The Inactivation of Virus and Destruction of Bacteria by Pomegranate Juice.”

In this exploratory study, Schiffenbauer tested 100% pomegranate juice and POMx liquid extract and the effect each had on a bacterial virus T1 and several bacteria over various periods of time, in various conditions and with the addition of other ingredients. The titer of T1 virus,(a model system) which infects E.coli B decreased up to 100% within 10 minutes of the addition of 100% pomegranate juice or POMx liquid extract. The research was funded by Pace University and POM Wonderful LLC and was conducted using POM Wonderful pomegranate products.

Both were also found to be effective in the destruction of bacteria S. mutans, known to cause cavities, S. aureus, the most common cause of staph infections, and B. cereus, a common cause of food poisoning. Schiffenbauer’s findings also indicate that 100% pomegranate juice and POMx liquid extract inhibit the spread of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), having widespread implications in the treatment of these potentially pathogenic microorganisms.

The addition of the POM products to various oral agents, including toothpaste and mouthwash, gave these agents an antimicrobial effect.

This work comes on the heels of earlier studies conducted by Schiffenbauer that found that white tea and green tea extracts also have antimicrobial effects. According to Schiffenbauer, pomegranate has gotten even better results than the teas.

About POM Wonderful
POM Wonderful is the largest grower of the Wonderful variety of pomegranate. The company exclusively grows and sells this variety because of its exquisite sweet flavor, health benefits, large size and plentiful juice. POM Wonderful’s pomegranates are grown in Central California, in the sunny San Joaquin Valley. Fresh pomegranates are in season from October through January and November is National Pomegranate Month. In addition to selling the fresh fruit, the company also juices its fresh pomegranates to make POM Wonderful pomegranate juice and POMx. To learn more, visit http://www.pomwonderful.com.

About Pace University
For more than 100 years Pace University has been preparing students to become leaders in their fields by providing an education that combines exceptional academics with professional experience and the New York advantage. Pace has three campuses, in New York City, Westchester, and White Plains. A private metropolitan university, Pace enrolls nearly 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

White Tea better than green tea?

New studies conducted at Pace University, have indicated that White Tea Extract (WTE) may have prophylactic applications in retarding growth of bacteria that cause Staphylococcus infections, Streptococcus infections, pneumonia and dental caries. The effect of WTE was determined by observing zones of inhibition of bacteria grown on Mueller Hinton II Agar (Kirby-Bauer technique). In regard to bacterial virus inactivation, White Tea was more effective than green tea. Results obtained with the bacterial virus, a model system; suggest that WTE may have an anti-viral effect on human pathogenic viruses. The addition of White Tea Extract to various toothpastes enhanced the anti-microbial effect of these oral agents.

Contact: Mary E. Horgan 914-923-2798 mhorgan@pace.edu

White Tea better than green tea?
NEW STUDY SHOWS THAT WHITE TEA HAS AN INHIBITORY EFFECT ON VARIOUS PATHOGENIC BACTERIA, FUNGI AND BACTERIAL VIRUS.

Anti-Viral and Anti-Bacterial effect of Toothpaste is enhanced by adding White Tea Extract.

New York, NY – May 23, 2004 – New studies conducted at Pace University, have indicated that White Tea Extract (WTE) may have prophylactic applications in retarding growth of bacteria that cause Staphylococcus infections, Streptococcus infections, pneumonia and dental caries. The effect of WTE was determined by observing zones of inhibition of bacteria grown on Mueller Hinton II Agar (Kirby-Bauer technique). In regard to bacterial virus inactivation, White Tea was more effective than green tea. Results obtained with the bacterial virus, a model system; suggest that WTE may have an anti-viral effect on human pathogenic viruses. The addition of White Tea Extract to various toothpastes enhanced the anti-microbial effect of these oral agents.

Studies have also indicated that WTE has an anti-fungal effect on Penicillium chrysogenum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the presence of WTE, Penicillium spores and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells were totally inactivated. It is suggested that WTE may have an anti-fungal effect on pathogenic fungi.

“Past studies have shown that green tea stimulates the immune system to fight disease,” says Milton Schiffenbauer, Ph.D., a microbiologist and professor in the Department of Biology at Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts & Sciences and primary author of the research. “Our research shows White Tea Extract can actually destroy in vitro the organisms that cause disease. Study after study with tea extract proves that it has many healing properties. This is not an old wives tale, it’s a fact.”

Several findings in the new study are of particular interest:

• The Anti-Viral and Anti-Bacterial effect of white tea (Stash and Templar) is greater than that of green tea.

• The anti-viral and anti-bacterial effect of several toothpastes including, Aim, Aquafresh, Colgate, Crest and Orajel were enhanced by the addition of White Tea Extract.

• White tea extract exhibited an anti-fungal effect on both Penicillium chrysogenum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

• White Tea Extract may have application in the inactivation of pathogenic human microbes, i.e., bacteria, viruses, and fungi.

The results of this study will be presented at the 104th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology on May 23, New Orleans, Louisiana

Dr. Schiffenbauer can be reached at (212) 346-1968 or mschiffenbauer@pace.edu

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. (www.pace.edu)

New Study Shows Green, Black and White Teas Adversely Affect Bacterial Virus Infection

According to a new study conducted at Pace University, green, black and white teas have an adverse effect on the bacterial virus T1, which infects Escherichia coli B. The research also indicates that the anti-viral effects of oral agents such as toothpaste and mouthwash are enhanced by the addition of tea extracts.

NEW STUDY SHOWS GREEN, BLACK AND WHITE TEAS ADVERSELY AFFECT BACTERIAL VIRUS INFECTION
Results Indicate Anti-Viral Effects of Toothpaste and Mouthwash are Enhanced By Addition of Tea Extract

New York, NY – May 20, 2002 – According to a new study conducted at Pace University, green, black and white teas have an adverse effect on the bacterial virus T1, which infects Escherichia coli B. The research also indicates that the anti-viral effects of oral agents such as toothpaste and mouthwash are enhanced by the addition of tea extracts.

“Our study shows that tea has a very potent anti-viral effect on bacteriophage viability,” says Milton Schiffenbauer, Ph.D., a microbiologist and professor in the Department of Biology at Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts & Sciences and primary author of the research. “We found that the addition of polyphenol extract (a tea compound with antioxidant properties) to oral agents such as toothpaste and mouthwash significantly reduces bacterial virus infection. In some cases, total inactivation of the virus responsible for infecting Escherichia coli was achieved.”

All teas contain polyphenols or antioxidants that protect human cells from reactive atoms (free radicals) that are responsible for body tissue damage. Flavorids are a group of polyphenols that occur naturally in tea. It is suspected that the concentration level of these polyphenols in the body is responsible for the beneficial properties of tea. Polyphenols may also contribute to the prevention of various types of cancer, including pancreas, colon, bladder, prostate and breast cancer.

Several findings are of particular interest:

· The anti-viral effect of green tea (Templer loose tea) is much more substantial than the anti-viral effects of either black or white teas.

· Results using Eden organic green teas (Bancha, Genmaicha, Hojicha and Kukicha) indicate that green tea extract from tea bags is more effective than loose tea, filtered or unfiltered.

· Caffeinated green and black teas are more effective as anti-viral agents than decaffeinated green and black teas.

· Teas and polyphenol extract may have applications in the inactivation of human pathogenic viruses.

The results of this study will be presented at the 102nd General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology in Salt Lake City, Utah, May 19-23.

Dr. Schiffenbauer can be reached at (212) 346-1968 or mschiffenbauer@pace.edu .

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. (www.pace.edu)

The Lienhard School of Nursing Awarded $144,000 to Support Practice in the Community

The Hugoton Foundation has awarded the Lienhard School of Nursing (LSN) $144,000 to support faculty practice and to enhance community-based practice nursing education.

Contact: Mary E. Horgan
(914) 923-2798
mhorgan@pace.edu

Pleasantville, N. Y. – The Hugoton Foundation has awarded the Lienhard School of Nursing (LSN) $144,000 to support faculty practice and to enhance community-based practice nursing education.

“We have been very fortunate to have funding from the Hugoton Foundation for primary healthcare research that supports faculty development,” said Lillie Shortridge-Baggett, executive director of the Center for Research, Clinical Practice and International Affairs (CNRCPIA) at the LSN. “This is the first time we have received monies to support scholarly practice for faculty and pre-RN and RN interns.”

The Hugoton Foundation grant will help support LSN’s continued focus on aiding underserved children and families in New York and Westchester County by providing primary healthcare with a focus on health promotion and maintenance. LSN students will work in partnership with LSN faculty to provide primary health care including physical assessments, community assessments, immunizations, and health promotion programs on a contractual basis.

The funding will support faculty and student clinical experiences at community partnership sites in New York City, the Bronx and Westchester County, including The Boys and Girls Republic (BGR) at the Henry Street Settlement in New York City; YonkerSpectrum School Health Program and Pathways for Youth in the Bronx.

“When faculty engage in teaching in a practice setting everyone benefits,” said Marie Truglio-Londrigan, assistant professor and director of faculty practice.

The Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University offers a number of degree programs including the 4-year BS program; the baccalaureate completion program for RNs; an accelerated RN/BS/MS for RN’s; combined degree BSN/MS program for non-nursing college graduates; master’s programs in case management, family nurse practitioner, psychiatric nurse practitioner, and nursing informatics; and a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study option in each specialty. The LSN also has three centers: The Center for Nursing Research, Clinical Practice and International Affairs, the Center for Continuing Education in Nursing and Health Care, and the Learning Resource Center, that enrich the educational experience and support student learning.

Pace University Conference to Address the Future of Medicare, June 11

Pace University’s Center for Health Policy Education and
Research will present a conference on “Medicare: What’s Likely to Happen,
and to Whom” on Friday, June 11 from 8:15 to 11:30 a.m., Room 208 at the Lubin
Graduate Center, 1 Martine Avenue in White Plains. The cost of the program is
$60. For more information or to register, call (914) 422-4298.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
WHITE PLAINS, NY – Pace University’s Center for Health Policy Education and
Research will present a conference on “Medicare: What’s Likely to Happen,
and to Whom” on Friday, June 11 from 8:15 to 11:30 a.m., Room 208 at the Lubin
Graduate Center, 1 Martine Avenue in White Plains. The cost of the program is
$60. For more information or to register, call (914) 422-4298.

Conference speakers will include Diane Archer, executive director of the Medicare
Rights Center in New York; Howard S. Berliner, chair of Health Services Management
and Policy at the New School for Social Research; Alison E. Greene, regional
director of the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services; and Arthur E. Weintraub,
president of the Northern Metropolitan Hospital Association. Professor Bernard M.
Weinstein, director of Pace University’s Center for Health Policy Education and
Research, will serve as moderator for the program. The conference is co-sponsored
with the Northern Metropolitan Hospital Association and the New York Society for
Health Planning.

The Center for Health Policy Education and Research was founded in 1996 by the Dyson
College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Public Administration in order to advance
health care policy education and research activities at Pace University, and to assist
health care providers in the Greater New York area in meeting the demands of the
community.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City, and
Westchester County. Nearly 13,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate
degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business,
School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law,
Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Lillie Shortridge-Baggett Receives Nursing Education Alumni Association’s 1999 Nursing Scholarship and Research Achievement Award

Dr. Lillie Shortridge-Baggett received the prestigious Nursing Education Alumni Association’s 1999 Nursing Scholarship and Research Achievement Award. Shortridge-Baggett is a professor of nursing and executive director of the Center for Nursing Research, Clinical Practice and International Affairs at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, where she conducts
research, leads the model Health Care Unit and mentors other nurse researchers
throughout the world. Shortridge-Baggett has been a member and officer of numerous professional organizations and commissions and holds joint appointments at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands, the Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia, and at Pace University, Lienhard School of Nursing.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1696
News@Pace.Edu

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. – Dr. Lillie Shortridge-Baggett received the prestigious
Nursing Education Alumni Association’s 1999 Nursing Scholarship and Research
Achievement Award. Shortridge-Baggett is a professor of nursing and executive
director of the Center for Nursing Research, Clinical Practice and International
Affairs at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, where she conducts
research, leads the model Health Care Unit and mentors other nurse researchers
throughout the world. Shortridge-Baggett has been a member and officer of
numerous professional organizations and commissions and holds joint
appointments at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands, the Queensland
University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia, and at Pace University, Lienhard
School of Nursing.

The NEAA Award recognizes Shortridge-Baggett’s excellent work and leadership in
the field of nursing research. Over time, Shortridge-Baggett has received several
million dollars of funding for different research projects. Her body of research
addresses behavioral change and health promotion.

Shortridge-Baggett has presented her work at national and international nursing
conferences and has published numerous articles in scholarly journals. She was a
member of the planning committee for the Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing
Research Congress, July 1998, president of the North American Consortium for
Nursing and Allied Health and is a member of the Global Institute for Nursing and
Health. Shortridge-Baggett states, “Being involved in research internationally
is both challenging and rewarding. I am most fortunate to have had opportunities
that have lead to this award.”

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and
Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate
and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin
School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of
Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.