EverydayHealth: “5 Questions Doctors Ask When Screening for Depression”

Mental health professionals rely on a number of screening tools to accurately diagnose depression. Here’s a peek at the questions they ask — so you can assess your own risk.

Not everyone experiences the same warning signs of depression, according to a just-published article on EverydayHealth.com.  Some people may endure sadness, hopelessness, feelings of guilt; others may lose interest in their favorite activities, have trouble thinking clearly, or face fatigue and changes in their sleeping or eating patterns.

“Diagnosing depression requires a complete history and physical exam,” says Richard Shadick, PhD, associate adjunct professor of psychology and director of the counseling center at Pace University in New York City. Doctors must also rule out medical problems such as thyroid disease and consider coexisting emotional health issues like anxiety disorder, post traumatic stress, and substance abuse.

What goes into a depression screening? “There are many types of depression scales and depression screens,” explains Shadick. “The questions asked look for common symptoms as well as how much these symptoms might be affecting a person’s ability to function and maintain relationships.”

EverydayHealth.com: “Why Are So Many Gay Teens Depressed?”

Too often, hostile environments at school and at home make gay and lesbian adolescents depressed. Dr. Richard Shadick, director of Pace’s NYC Campus Counseling Center, suggests how teens in the LGBT adolescent scene can find the emotional support they need.

A recent National School Climate Survey of 7,000 lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) students, ranging in age from 13 to 21, found that 80 percent had been verbally harassed, 40 percent physically harassed, 60 percent felt unsafe at school, and one in three had missed a day of school in the last month due to fear of violence.

Given these struggles, it’s no surprise that a LGBT teen may experience depression.

“Family members and friends can provide needed support for a loved one who might be depressed,” advised Richard Shadick, PhD, director of the Counseling Center and an adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University in New York City, in an interview with EverydayHealth.com.  “Warning signs include a change in how a gay teen relates (they become withdrawn and isolated), how they look (they may become unkempt, sad, or dispirited), or how they act (they may give away prize possessions, talk of wanting to die, and/or engage in impulsive and dangerous behavior).  They may also drink or use drugs heavily.  And if a teen has a family member that has died because of suicide or they have tried to kill themselves before, then there should be extra concern,” said Shadick.

Click here to read more of the article – “Why Are So Many Gay Teen Depressed?” – which appears on EverydayHealth.com, a leading provider of online health solutions with more than 28 million monthly unique visitors.

The New York Times: “Student Gripes Have a Point: Campus Dining Fails Exams”

In New York City, where health inspectors have begun requiring restaurants and some food services to post letter grades for cleanliness, students have a new reason to gripe: bad report cards. It is unclear whether health inspectors are citing more violations because of the rating system they introduced last summer, or whether conditions in campus kitchens have taken a slide.

At Pace, an inspection of the main cafeteria on March 24 resulted in 79 violation points and the city’s decision to shut it. City inspectors found soiled wiping cloths and inadequate provision for hand-washing, as well as cold and hot food held at unsafe temperatures.

After the cafeteria reopened the next day, students organized a boycott and laid out demands for a new food provider. Within days, the university’s president and top administrators appeared at a town-hall-style meeting, assuring students that a new operator had been brought in temporarily and that they could help choose a permanent replacement.

“I was actually shocked at how well they responded,” Lance M. Pacheco, executive president of the student government association, told The New York Times.

The Largest Spanish Newspaper in the U.S. Seeks Pace Professor’s Expertise

La Opinión, the Largest Spanish-language newspaper in the U.S. quoted Pace’s director of the Counseling Center and Associate Professor or Psychology, Dr. Richard Shadick.

La Opinión, the largest Spanish-language newspaper in the U.S., quoted Pace’s director of the Counseling Center and Associate Professor of Psychology, Dr. Richard Shadick, about the impact of the recession on the mental health of students.

Translated text of the article:

Kristina Segura-Baird is now considered a “normal” teenager. But for a long time she had to cope in silence with the negative emotions caused by the sexual abuse she suffered.

“I did not want to talk to anyone about this, but now I’m glad to have received professional help,” says Young, who participated yesterday in a ceremony to support new laws that expand mental health services in schools.

Alarming data revealed that suicide is the third most common cause of death among 15 to 24 years and according to the American Academy of Pediatrics , one in five children and adolescents in the country suffer from some kind of mental problem, which is now compounded by the current economic crisis.

Dr. Richard Shadick , director of the Counseling Center at Pace University in New York and associate professor of psychology, said that the situation has worsened in recent times.

“Young people are suffering from the stress in their families and there are fewer services due to budget cuts,” says Shadick, noting that all of this greatly affects their academic performance as well as spurs other social ills.

Mental health programs were cut by 4% in 2009 and 5% in 2010, and will be reduced by 8% in 2011 – at a time when they are needed most.

A recent survey conducted jointly by The New York Times and CBS shows that four out of 10 children of unemployed parents show behavioral changes.  But Shadick clarifies that in many cases parents are so affected by their own problems, they don’t even notice these changes in their children.

Convinced that many of these problems can be prevented, Congresswoman Grace Napolitano spoke yesterday before a packed auditorium at the middle school youth Eastmont the Montebello Unified School District ( MUSD ).

Both she and a player for the Lakers, Ron Artest, shared some personal experiences, emphasizing the idea that we should not feel embarrassed when asking for help.

“I am a better father and husband because I have spent a lot of time and money to receive counseling. But I think everyone should have free access to these services,” said Artest.

Napolitano, author of the measure, HR 2531 Mental Health Act in Schools, stated that if it is approved by the legislature, the plan she created in 2001 in his district which has now expanded to 11 schools, including Eastmont, could be replicated throughout the country.

“What motivated me to create the program was to learn that one in three young Latinas has contemplated suicide,” said Napolitano.

——–

To read the article in Spanish, visit http://www.impre.com/laopinion/noticias/primera-pagina/2010/9/10/salud-mental-recibe-apoyo-209816-1.html#commentsBlock

Lienhard School of Nursing “Admits” Harvey, A Lifelike Cardiovascular Simulator

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing now has a permanent patient on staff. The school is the recipient of “Harvey,” a cardiopulmonary patient simulator, thanks to an $87,500 grant from the Hugoton Foundation.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

LIENHARD SCHOOL OF NURSING “ADMITS” HARVEY, A LIFELIKE CARDIOVASCULAR SIMULATOR

NEW YORK, NY, May 14, 2010 – Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing now has a permanent patient on staff. The school is the recipient of “Harvey,” a cardiopulmonary patient simulator, thanks to an $87,500 grant from the Hugoton Foundation.

He’s not human, but Harvey is no dummy. He simulates 30 cardiac diseases with realistic heart and lung sounds at the touch of a button. He can be programmed to have various conditions that students diagnose and treat, such as hypertension, angina, myocardial infarct (“heart attack”), mitral valve prolapse, or a ventricular septal defect (“a hole in the heart”).

Harvey allows Pace University nursing students to practice their bedside diagnostic skills as often as they wish on him – and build confidence along the way. Increasingly nursing schools are turning to patient simulators to train students so they can practice on mannequins without fear of making fatal mistakes. The American College of Cardiology Task Force on Teaching recommends Harvey for training.

Although Harvey turned 42 this year, he is better than ever. The first Harvey simulators were heavy, weighing over 700 pounds. With his countless health issues he has helped train thousands of health care professionals at over 140 medical centers worldwide. With the trend toward shorter hospital stays, nursing students benefit from the continual presence of a patient who tolerates constant treatment and prodding.

The new slim, trim Harvey, weighing just 90 pounds, has undergone quite a few changes since he came on the scene in 1968. Harvey used to have a system of cams and levers that drove pistons to simulate his heartbeat and pulse. Today digital technology regulates Harvey’s heartbeat and pulse. With the addition of abnormal breath sounds, Harvey can now simulate a variety of pulmonary diseases. The newer Harvey also simulates additional cardiac disease states, has the ability to speak, and an interactive link to a multimedia computer curriculum in cardiology. The creators believe that Harvey will do for lung disease simulation what he already did for cardiac disease training.

According to dean and professor Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, “Harvey’s computer controlled simulation allows our advanced practice and entry-level nursing students to learn, practice and repeat procedures before performing them on real patients. Our students will get evidence-based learning experiences that are deeply meaningful while at the same time realistic and safe.”

Feldman noted that technology has transformed nursing education at Lienhard over the years and that Harvey will be in good company with a growing Lienhard family of several other patient simulators at Pace, along with equipment commonly found in a critical care unit or Emergency Room (ER): patient monitor, respirator, 12 lead EKG machine, multi-line IV pumps and a crash cart complete with defibrillator. Pace’s “Vital Sim” simulators have heart and lung sounds, blood pressure, arterial oxygenation levels, and even cough and groan like a real patient. This makes for a highly realistic “patient encounter” in the safe environment of the Learning Resource Center. “We are hoping to continue expansion of simulation learning as the field, and our student population, have grown,” Feldman said.

Professor Joanne Singleton, PhD, will work with aspiring family nurse practitioners to help them hone their skills on Harvey. She said, “Harvey is truly a lifesaver; he will help the nurses of tomorrow learn or improve skills and effective teamwork behaviors that will prevent health care errors that compromise patient safety. Mistakes can be made safely on Harvey that will help students learn without any negative outcomes on real people. Students who work with Harvey can learn at their own pace and be less likely to make health care errors when it counts – in a real-life situation.”

Assistant Professor Lucille Ferrara, EdD, will use Harvey for a pilot study in fall 2010 with nurse practitioner students to compare teaching methods. The study will examine high-fidelity simulation-based assessment, delivered via Harvey, versus more traditional teaching tools such as case studies. Both student and teacher perspectives will be explored. The results of this study will be critical as faculty in the family nurse practitioner program plan to transition from teaching with case studies to teaching in a more hands-on way with high fidelity (Harvey) simulation-based clinical skills assessment.

About Pace University: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

###

Fulbright Winner Aims to Remove Barriers to Quality Healthcare in Bangladesh

With much debate regarding healthcare systems worldwide, John J. Ringhisen, RN, a graduate of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, will study cultural and social barriers that prevent access to primary health care as a recipient of a 2010-2011 Fulbright Research Grant to South and Central Asia, Bangladesh.

PACE UNIVERSITY FULBRIGHT WINNER AIMS TO REMOVE BARRIERS TO QUALITY HEALTHCARE IN BANGLADESH

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contacts: Cara Cea, 914-773-3312 or ccea@pace.edu;
Sharon Lewis, 914-773-3973 or slewis2@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY FULBRIGHT WINNER AIMS TO REMOVE BARRIERS TO QUALITY HEALTHCARE IN BANGLADESH

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, April 28, 2010 – With much debate regarding healthcare systems worldwide, John J. Ringhisen, RN, a graduate of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, will study cultural and social barriers that prevent access to primary health care as a recipient of a 2010-2011 Fulbright Research Grant to South and Central Asia, Bangladesh.

Ringhisen will volunteer his services in Dhaka, Bangladesh for nine months beginning in August, as a registered nurse/participant observer in local primary health care centers and the communities they serve. In this role, Ringhisen will interview community and public health officials to collect their opinions on what prevents their target groups from participating.

Ringhisen hopes to bring back some important lessons that can be applied to our healthcare system in the U.S. “Accessibility to healthcare is critical. More attention needs to be paid to rural and isolated populations. Instead of a healthcare clinic spending money on new equipment, perhaps door-to-door van service can be provided so families without any means of transportation can get the medical attention they need. I would advocate securing a grant to provide a ‘clinic on wheels’ that would come into the rural communities to help with basic healthcare needs such as vaccinations and wellness exams to avoid the potentially long travel time to healthcare facilities. There are existing programs that focus on specialties such as Outreach Mobile Eye Clinics (OMEC) out of Australia. Even more important, however, is to create a system of hard site clinics as logistical support hubs so that these mobile clinics can stay in the field longer, probe deeper into remote areas, and offer more emergent care if needed.”

The Wichita, KS native graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1999 with a bachelor of science degree in physics and minor in electrical engineering. Upon graduation, he received a commission as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army’s Finance Corps. John served in Seoul, South Korea and supported operations in Bosnia, Kosovo, and Iraq until his honorable discharge in 2003.

After working as an office manager and comptroller for several small businesses and a private dental practice, John realized his future in healthcare through Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing Combined Degree Program (CDP). In 2008 John was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation New Careers in Nursing Scholar. He graduated in December 2009 with a bachelor of science degree in Nursing and received his New York State Registered Professional Nursing License in March 2010.

Ringhisen interacted with patients from diverse backgrounds while working in the emergency room at Westchester Medical Center and with the Visiting Nurse Association of the Hudson Valley.

“John tells us he was inspired by the classes he took in the CDP, particularly those that focused on cultural competency in nursing,” said Lienhard dean Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN. “He was able to apply what he was learning about cultural competence in the classroom in a hands-on, practical way and wondered how other countries fared with their healthcare systems, especially those in the developing world.“

Ringhisen is learning Bengali and Hindi in preparation for his departure to Bangladesh. He also speaks intermediate Spanish and Arabic, and beginner Hangul (Korean).

Martha Greenberg, PhD, R.N., Associate Professor and Chairperson Undergraduate Nursing Studies, said, “From the first day of meeting him, John stood out as a leader among this peers. John is a decorated Veteran of the United States military. He is articulate, well read, a nursing scholar, kind and compassionate to his peers and colleagues, and a leader. He has a proven track record of adapting to different cultural environments having served in Iraq. Finally, he is committed to working with underserved people to improve their health and be a change agent not only abroad but locally, nationally and globally.”

According to Dr. Lillie M. Shortridge-Baggett, EdD, RN, FAAN “John is Lienhard School of Nursing’s second Fulbright scholar; our first is Patty Sayre, and both are exceptional students. We are very proud of their success.”

Ringhisen is married to the former Melissa Grider of Lombard, IL, a Major and a full time professor and scholarship advisor with the Department of Social Sciences at West Point. Ringhisen says, “She has two Rhodes Scholars, one East-West, two Truman Scholars, nine Rotary, and two National Science Foundation Scholars to mentor and assist with their own overseas studies. The joke in the house right now is whether or not she gets to ‘claim’ me as her one Fulbright Scholar since she helped with my application process.” The couple has two sons, John Patrick age 7 and Trevor Alfred age 3. While Ringhisen is in Bangladesh, his family will remain in the U.S., staying at West Point with an extensive support system.

About the Fulbright Program: The Fulbright program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the United States government and is designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the US and the people of other countries. The Fulbright program provides participants – chosen for their academic merit and leadership potential – with the opportunity to study, teach and conduct research, exchange ideas and contribute to finding solutions to shared international concerns.

About Pace University: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Lienhard Spring Scholarly Colloquium Part of Grassroots Movement to Make 2010 Year of the Nurse

Noted international nurse historian, Patricia D’Antonio, Ph.D., Associate Professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, will speak at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing spring scholarly colloquium on Monday, March 8 in Pleasantville, NY. The colloquium is part of a grassroots international movement that has declared 2010 the Year of the Nurse to raise awareness of the critical role nurses play and to commemorate the 100th anniversary of famed nurse Florence Nightingale’s death.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact:

Sharon Lewis, Lienhard School of Nursing, (914) 773-3973, slewis2@pace.edu

Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

SCHOLARLY COLLOQUIUM RECOGNIZES FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE AS FOUNDER OF MODERN NURSING

Noted nurse historian Patricia D’Antonio to keynote

Part of grassroots movement to make 2010 the Year of the Nurse

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, March 5, 2010 – Noted international nurse historian, Patricia D’Antonio, Ph.D., Associate Professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, will speak at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing spring scholarly colloquium on Monday, March 8 in Pleasantville, NY. The colloquium is part of a grassroots international movement that has declared 2010 the Year of the Nurse to raise awareness of the critical role nurses play and to commemorate the 100th anniversary of famed nurse Florence Nightingale’s death.

The event will take place from 11:30am – 2:30pm in the Butcher Suite in the Kessel Student Center, entrance 3, 861 Bedford Rd.

D’Antonio’s talk, “Florence Nightingale: Myth and Meaning” is based on her latest book titled, “American Nursing: A History of Knowledge, Authority and the Meaning of Work.” According to Lienhard professor Sandra B. Lewenson, Ed.D., RN, FAAN, the event will “raise questions about nursing’s invisibility and nursing’s historical role in health care reform efforts. As the current debate over health care reform makes daily headlines, it is important to remember that Nightingale was a major reformer. There is this image of her, a myth really, of ‘the lady with the lamp’ — the reality is that Nightingale was a reformer who made major changes; she was the founder of the modern nursing movement.”

For more information, or to RSVP, please contact Sharon Lewis slewis2@pace.edu or Cara Cea at ccea@pace.edu.

About Lienhard: The Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University increased its enrollment in 2009-2010 by about 70 students, the fourth year with such an increase. In recent years it has won over $5 million in federal and private grants. Lienhard’s Family Nurse Practitioner program is ranked ninth nationally in the U.S. News & World Report survey of America’s Best Graduate Schools; last year the school added a doctoral program. Harriet R. Feldman, Ph.D., the dean, is a nurse who has emerged as a national authority on three major trends that are changing the nursing profession – the shortage of nurses and nurse educators, the involvement of nurses in promoting health policy, and the promotion of evidence-based procedures in nursing education and practice. With a Ph.D. in nursing science from New York University, she has published more than 90 books, chapters and articles and testified before Congress. In the national discussion of health care reform, she is a strong advocate of using nurse practitioners to meet the increasing need for expanding primary care delivery to focus on health promotion and maintenance and the management of chronic illness.

About Pace University: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

National Eating Disorders Awareness Event – “Eating Disorders, Body Image, Perfectionism”

In recognition of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week – and a society that often places high value on physical beauty and thinness Pace University is holding an event called “Eating Disorders, Body Image, Perfectionism.”

PACE UNIVERSITY MEDIA ALERT

Tuesday, February 23, 2010 – NYC Campus, 7 pm

In recognition of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week – and a society that often places high value on physical beauty and thinness …

“EATING DISORDERS, BODY IMAGE, PERFECTIONISM”

• Documentary Screenings/Q & A with filmmakers:

— “Beauty in the Eyes of the Beheld” by Liza Figueroa Kravinsky;

— “Wet Dreams & False Images” (Sundance Award Winner) by Jesse Epstein

• Emilie Zaslow, Pace Assistant Professor of Communications Studies and author of “Feminism, Inc.: Coming of Age in Girl Power Media Culture” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009) discusses how mediated images work to shape young people’s perceptions of beauty as well as body size and shape.

Event is FREE and open to the general public (male & female)

Why: To raise consciousness during National Eating Disorders Awareness Week (Feb 21 – 27) about the potentially life-threatening seriousness of eating disorders and the societal pressures, attitudes and behaviors which contribute to them. Also to spread a message of hope: Help is available, recovery is possible and those affected are not alone in their struggle!

According to Dr. Brian Petersen, Pace Counseling Center, “Eating disorders occur in both male and female college students and often are exacerbated by the stresses of the college/university environment. An eating disorder can have serious medical and psychological consequences. Symptoms may even become life-threatening. Even if you don’t have an eating disorder, you may know of someone who does – and we hope that you’ll urge them to attend this event. It’s incumbent on all of us in a caring community to become more aware of this important issue.”

Who/What: “Beauty in the Eyes of the Beheld” is a documentary by Liza Figueroa Kravinsky looking at modern perceptions of beauty – including weight. “Being beautiful is overrated,” says the filmmaker, who interviewed and followed the lives of former beauty pageant queens, a physician, an exotic dancer, an entrepreneur and a musician who worked with famous rock star Prince.

“Wet Dreams and False Images” is a Sundance award-winning documentary by Jesse Epstein that utilizes humor to raise serious concerns about the marketplace of commercial illusion – photo retouching in magazines and ads – and unrealizable standards of physical perfection.

When: Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 7 pm – 10 pm

Where: Pace University/East of City Hall, One Pace Plaza, Student Union – B Level, New York, NY 10038. Directions: http://www.pace.edu/pace/about-us/all-about-pace/directions-to-all-campuses/new-york-city-campus

Media Contact: Samuella Becker, Pace Public Information, sbecker2@pace.edu; 212-346-1637 or 917-734-5172.

RSVP/General Information: Dr. Brian Petersen, Pace Counseling Center, email: bpetersen@pace.edu

About Pace University: For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. Visit Pace on the web at www.pace.edu| Facebook | Twitter (@PaceUNews) | Flickr | YouTube

Event Co-Sponsor/Pace Counseling Center: The Counseling Center Staff is available to discuss any personal or emotional difficulties in complete confidentiality. Services include individual and group counseling and range from counseling for personal and professional problems to crisis intervention. Student concerns include relationship and family issues, roommate problems, drug or alcohol use, self-esteem, and problems with eating. http://www.pace.edu/page.cfm?doc_id=5105

Event Co-Sponsor/Dyson College of Arts and Science’s Body and Mind (BAM) House: Academic success has been linked to healthy bodies and healthy minds. BAM House focuses on personal, physical and emotional wellness as well as social change as related to health and wellness. Activities include weekly yoga; workshops about fresh food, happiness, relaxation techniques, journaling; and fun activities such as movie nights, ice skating, and baseball games.

Event Co-Sponsor/Women’s and Gender Studies engages in research and exploration concerning all areas of women’s experience. Interdisciplinary and multicultural by definition, Women’s and Gender Studies emphasizes the importance of gender while including other essential categories of analysis such as race and class.

Event Co-Sponsor/The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), headquartered in Seattle, Wash., a not-for-profit organization, supports individuals and families affected by eating disorders and advocates for prevention, treatment and research funding for eating disorders. Since the inception of its Helpline in 1999, NEDA has referred more than 50,000 people to treatment and tallies more than 40 million hits annually on its Web site. For more information on eating disorders, visit www.NationalEatingDisorders.org.

Health Care Experts Weigh in on Reform Debate and New Cancer Screening Guidelines

Primary care nurses and nurse educators at Pace University’s rapidly-growing Lienhard School of Nursing have informed views on the current news about healthcare reform and guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Sharon Lewis, Lienhard School of Nursing, (914) 773-3973, slewis2@pace.edu Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

EXPERT NURSES AVAILABLE TO COMMENT ON WAYS TO INCREASE PRIMARY CARE IN FEDERAL HEALTH CARE REFORM

AND NEW CANCER SCREENING GUIDELINES

Nurse practitioners best group to handle increasing need for primary care, says dean of nursing school; Nursing practice should not change yet, say Pace University experts

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, December 2009 – Primary care nurses and nurse educators at Pace University’s rapidly-growing Lienhard School of Nursing have informed views on the current news about healthcare reform and guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening.

All can be reached directly at the numbers below as well as through media contacts above.

Nurse practitioners are ready to meet increased demand for primary care: Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN

Dean of the Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University, Feldman has emerged as a national authority on three major trends that are changing the nursing profession – the shortage of nurses and nurse educators, the involvement of nurses in promoting health policy, and the promotion of evidence-based procedures in education and nursing practice. With a PhD in nursing science from New York University, she has published more than 90 books, chapters and articles and testified before Congress. Her school’s enrollment is up this fall by about 80 students, the fourth year with such an increase; in recent years the school has been awarded over $5 million in federal and private grants. Lienhard’s Family Nurse Practitioner Program is ranked ninth nationally in the U.S. News & World Report survey of “America’s Best Graduate Schools 2008;” last year the school added a doctor of nursing practice program. Feldman is on US Representative Nita Lowey’s (D-NY) Health Advisory Committee and a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and of the New York Academy of Medicine. Feldman is also the 2009 chair of the Board of Commissioners of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), the national nonprofit agency that exclusively accredits baccalaureate and higher degree programs in nursing.

Feldman says: “A major tenet of the proposed Health Care Reform legislation is to expand primary care delivery to focus on health promotion and maintenance and the management of chronic illness. The current plan very properly envisions using nurse practitioners to meet the increasing need and I cannot think of a more appropriate group of professionals.

With a focus on preventive care, nurse practitioners have been delivering primary care in a variety of inpatient, outpatient, and community settings in for over 40 years. While primary care physicians’ numbers are down 30%, the number of programs preparing nurse practitioners has been increasing annually in recent years to meet growing demand and expand the nursing workforce. There are now 323 programs that prepare students to join the workforce of 2.9 million nurse practitioners.” Nurse practitioners are registered nurses with advanced preparation and qualified to prescribe medication.

Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN Dean and Professor, Pace University Lienhard School of Nursing Interim Dean, School of Education Phone: (914)-773-3342 Fax: (914)-773-3480 Email: hfeldman@pace.edu

Don’t move too fast: Andrea Sonenberg, NP, CNM, DNSc

Assistant Professor Andrea Sonenberg, a nurse practitioner and certified nurse midwife with a doctorate from Columbia, is an expert in women’s health and in the regulation of advanced nursing practice and global use of Advanced-Practice Nurses (APNs) for vulnerable populations.

Sonenberg thinks it would be premature for APNs to change their cancer screening practices yet. She also recognizes that throughout history, periodic changes in guidelines for breast self-examination and the use of PAP smears have taken place as new evidence was uncovered and weighed by expert panels and organizations, and that these changes are always informed by dialogues beginning prior to their announcements.

She stresses that recommendations that may be made by the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) will be directed at routine screening schedules for low risk women. “Each provider must determine a client’s risk individually,” Sonenberg says.

She adds: “The fact that the USPSTF has a different membership than it did when the previous recommendations were made seven years ago is less relevant, in my view, than the fact that there is new evidence on which to base revised recommendations.”

On health care reform: “I would also like to caution against trying to link these new recommendations to the health care reform debate. I believe the timing is coincidental. Review of evidence by USPSTF is ongoing. Some believe that these recommendations are meant to save money for insurance companies, and therefore the health care system on the whole. It worries me that this belief could spread and lead us down a dangerous path regarding primary care and prevention.”

Andrea Sonenberg, NP, CNM, DNSc Assistant Professor, Pace University Lienhard School of Nursing 861 Bedford Road Pleasantville, New York 10570 Phone: (914) 773-3534 Fax: (914) 773-3345 E-mail: asonenberg@pace.edu

Still recommending mammograms: Audrey Hoover, MS, RN, FNP, WHNP

Audrey Hoover, MS, RN, FNP, WHNP, a family nurse practitioner who specializes in family and women’s health, is also taking a cautious approach to breast cancer screening and will carefully weigh all the information before changing her practice. She says, “This is very new data…. we are continuing to recommend mammograms for women at 40.”

Regarding PAP smears, Hoover recalls the overzealous screening and treatment of adolescents a few years ago that turned out to be unnecessary. Human papillomavirus (HPV) may increase the risk for cervical cancer and for abnormal PAP smears in certain women, depending on age. “We now know that he HPV virus tends to clear by about age 26,” says Hoover. “Early data analysis on the virus and recommendations on the treatment for it were premature.” Hoover is considering recommending new American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologist guidelines for PAP smears every two years starting at age 21, and every three years after age 30 for women who have had three consecutive negative PAP smears.

Hoover is associate director of University Health Care at Pace University which offers a full range of primary care services to the Pace community.

Audrey P. Hoover, FNP Family Nurse Practitioner and Associate Director Pace University Health Care NY Campus 41 Park Row, Rm 313 New York, NY 10038 Phone: 212 346-1600 Fax: 212 348-1308 E-mail: ahoover@pace.edu

About Pace University: For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Swine Flu and Similar Animal-Borne Viruses are Ticking Time Bombs Says Pace Law Professor

In the wake of the recent swine flu outbreak, Pace Law School environmental and animal law professor David Cassuto is warning that animal-borne viruses like the swine flu are ticking time bombs that not only pose a danger to humans, but the environment as well.

From: Pace Law School 78 North Broadway White Plains, NY 10603

Rubenstein Communications, Inc – Public Relations Contact: Gladwyn Lopez – 212-843-9231; glopez@rubenstein.com

Regina Pappalardo – 914-422-4268; rpappalardo@law.pace.edu

AVAILABLE FOR INTERVIEW

SWINE FLU AND SIMILAR ANIMAL-BORNE VIRUSES ARE TICKING TIME BOMBS RESULTING FROM IMPROPER CONFINEMENT AND POSE POTENTIAL DANGER FOR ENVIRONMENT SAYS PACE LAW SCHOOL PROFESSOR

* * * Professor Advises Contaminated Soil and Groundwater Should be of Equal Concern

In the wake of the recent swine flu outbreak, Pace Law School environmental and animal law professor David Cassuto is warning that animal-borne viruses like the swine flu are ticking time bombs that not only pose a danger to humans, but the environment as well.

“The best way to avert deadly flu is to stop creating ideal conditions for its incubation,” according to Professor Cassuto. “We’re hearing a lot of statements from officials about how pandemics like these are inevitable and that preparedness is the key. However, preventing the “factory farm” conditions that allow these viruses to fester and thrive is the real issue. New legislation and regulations may be needed.”

The overcrowding of thousands of pigs, cows, chickens, etc. into cramped, filthy quarters creates an environment that is ideal for the fast spread of potentially dangerous viruses, while the flies and other pests attracted to these conditions may allow for transportation of these diseases to other areas.

Of equal importance, Prof. Cassuto advises that these animal viruses that have developed from improper confinement situations can pose additional threats to the environment. “Pigs and other confined animals are fed millions of pounds of antibiotics every year. Those antibiotics make their way into the ground and water and eventually into us. The upshot is more drug-resistant bacteria and a systemic environmental contamination problem.”

**EDITOR’S PLEASE NOTE** Professor David Cassuto is available for interview by contacting Gladwyn Lopez at 212-843-9231 or glopez@rubenstein.com.