Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing Wins Third Grant for Scholarships to Increase Nursing Diversity

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing will again award scholarships to students from groups traditionally underrepresented in nursing, including men and people from disadvantaged backgrounds, thanks to a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN).

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu; 914-906-9680

Sharon Lewis, slewis2@pace.edu; 914-773-3973

Posted in partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

Scholarships funded through the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and American Association of Colleges of Nursing to go to students underrepresented in the profession

NEW YORK, NY, July30, 2010 – Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing will again award scholarships to students from groups traditionally underrepresented in nursing, including men and people from disadvantaged backgrounds, thanks to a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN).

Eight scholarships of $10,000 each will be awarded to students entering Lienhard’s accelerated Combined Degree Program (CDP)during the 2010-2011 academic year. This is Lienhard’s second award in three rounds of funding, which comes through the foundation’s RWJF New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) scholarship program.

The program was launched in 2008 to address the national nursing shortage and fuel the pipeline of diverse nursing faculty members, developing culturally competent health professionals and future leaders of the profession.

Pace University was among the first institutions in the nation to receive funding through the RWJF New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Programin 2008; the programhas already supported 12 Lienhard students.One of them, John Ringhisen, was recently awarded a Fulbright scholarship to conduct research on access to health care in Bangladesh.

“We are challenging the nation’s nursing schools to be innovative and resourceful in how they grow their nursing programs, diversify student populations and contribute to the nursing leadership of tomorrow,” said Denise A. Davis, Dr. P.H., the RWJFprogram officer for NCIN. “We are very pleased to support this unique approach, particularly at a time when growing numbers of Americans are gaining insurance and entering our health care system.”

Pace’s Combined Degree Program is an accelerated curriculum for college graduates who are not nurses and want to study nursing in a program that leads to a first professional nursing degree (the BS in nursing),combinedwith the optionof an advanced professional degree (the MS). Lienhard has long been a leader in education leading to second degrees for non-nursing college graduates and has offered the CDP since 1984. The school is known for preparing culturally competent leaders.

The NCIN program was created through RWJF and AACN to help enable schools of nursing expand their student capacity in accelerated baccalaureate and master’s programs. At the same time it aims to build a more diverse workforce to serve the needs of a changing population of patients. Schools receiving NCIN grantsprovide scholarships directly to students from groups underrepresented in nursing or from disadvantaged backgrounds. In its second year, 58 percent of scholarships went to students from diverse racial and ethnic groups and 37 percent went to men, who currently account for only 6.6 percent of the nation’s nurses.

Of the 63 institutions receiving funding, Pace is one of six in New York.In the 2010 – 2011 academic year, a total of 397 students in accelerated baccalaureate programs and 114 students in accelerated master’s programs will receive NICN scholarship funding.

The NCIN program addresses a number of challenges confronting nursing education, professional development for nurses, and the national nursing shortage. Accelerated programs like the ones supported by NCIN provide scholars with the most efficient route to licensure as registered nurses (RNs). They also create nursing opportunities for adults who have already completed a baccalaureate or graduate degree in another field. The programs prepare students to pass the licensure exam required for RNs in as little as 12-18 months, a quicker route to workforce eligibility than traditional programs.

By bringing more nurses into the profession at the baccalaureate and master’s levels, the NCIN program also helps to address the nation’s continuing shortage of nursing faculty members. Data from the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration show that nurses entering the profession via baccalaureate programs are four times more likely than other nurses to pursue a graduate degree in nursing. This trend is reflected in the NCIN scholars, as 95% of the students receiving funding in the first two years of the program indicate a desire to advance their education to the master’s and doctoral levels.

The RWJF New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program is clearly having a positive effect on the nation’s nursing schools. Many programs that received awards have used the NCIN funding to help leverage additional resources to add new faculty members, secure matching funding from state programs, develop mentoring and leadership development programs, strengthen outreach efforts, and establish new partnerships with community and practice leaders.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation focuses on the pressing health and health care issues facing our country.  As the nation’s largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to improving the health and health care of all Americans, the Foundation works with a diverse group of organizations and individuals to identify solutions and achieve comprehensive, meaningful, and timely change. For more than 35 years the Foundation has brought experience, commitment, and a rigorous, balanced approach to the problems that affect the health and health care of those it serves.Helping Americans lead healthier lives and get the care they need,the Foundation expects to make a difference in our lifetime.www.rwjf.org

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) is the national voice for university and four-year college education programs in nursing. Representing more than 640 member schools of nursing at public and private institutions nationwide, AACN’s educational, research, governmental advocacy, data collection, publications, and other programs work to establish quality standards for bachelor’s- and graduate-degree nursing education, assist deans and directors to implement those standards, influence the nursing profession to improve health care, and promote public support of baccalaureate and graduate nursing education, research, and practice. www.aacn.nche.edu

About the Lienhard School of Nursing: Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing has nearly doubled in size over the last five years, and now has more than 800 students enrolled in baccalaureate and master’s degree programs, all approved by the New York State Education Department and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. With classrooms and laboratories in culturally diverse urban and suburban settings, the school is committed to innovation and excellence in education, research, and practice in primary health care. Lienhard partners with communities to foster human growth and dignity and provide primary care, and prepares individuals, families, and communities at local, national, and international levels to meet health care demands now and in the future.

About Pace: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Philip Greiner Named Associate Dean for Faculty Development in Scholarship and Teaching at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing

Philip A. Greiner, DNSc, RN, has been named Associate Dean for Faculty Development in Scholarship and Teaching at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, starting this month. Greiner’s areas of expertise include electronic health records use with simulation, public health nursing and aging.

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, July 21, 2010 –Philip A. Greiner, DNSc, RN, has been named Associate Dean for Faculty Development in Scholarship and Teaching at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, starting this month. Greiner’s areas of expertise include electronic health records use with simulation, public health nursing and aging.

Greiner is expected to intensify Lienhard’s initiatives in preparing nurses for a field that is more driven by scholarship than ever before and in addressing President Obama’s call for computerization of the nation’s health care records within four years.

Greiner currently is Secretary of the Connecticut Public Health Association and a Board member for Southwest Community Health Center in Bridgeport, CT. At the Fairfield University School of Nursing, he served most recently as Associate Dean for Public Health and Entrepreneurial Initiatives, Associate Professor, and Director of the Health Promotion Center, a nurse-managed wellness center. Before that, he directed the school’s undergraduate program and was an assistant professor.

According to Lienhard School of Nursing Dean and Professor Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, “With nursing education evolving to prepare nurses for the needs of a changing and aging population and requiring a greater emphasis on research and other forms of scholarship, Dr. Greiner’s administrative experience, educational background and research focus will add extra depth and dimension to Lienhard’s offerings.” Feldman edited one of the first books on teaching evidence-based practice, an area in which Lienhard specializes.

Technology and nursing

Changes in how nurses are taught have been necessary to keep pace with evolving population demographics and developments like the nursing informatics technology boom, according to a recent Nursing Spectrum article that quotes Lienhard faculty members Rona F. Levin, RN, PhD and Martha J. Greenberg, RN, PhD.

Greiner said: “With nursing more focused on using the latest technology and applying scientific results, my goal is to help build on Lienhard’s strengths in these areas and expand opportunities for faculty members to grow in their scholarship and teaching roles.”

Lienhard created his position as part of an enhanced commitment to teaching and learning with research and scholarship. Attracted to Pace’s 44 year record of preparing nurses to meet the needs of diverse and aging populations, Greiner sees areas of opportunity in expanding on existing faculty research in gerontology, cardiology, smoking cessation and nursing informatics. 

Homeless health care

Greiner’s career in public health began when he graduated from a 5-year cooperative program in nursing at Albright College and The Reading Hospital School of Nursing in Reading, PA. He earned a BSN and MSN in Community Health Nursing, and a DNSc at the University of Pennsylvania. Greiner completed two post-doctoral studies at the University of Kentucky, the first in homeless health care through the College of Nursing and the second in epidemiology and aging through the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging. He also completed the John A. Hartford Foundation/NYU Hartford Institute Gerontological Research Scholar program at New York University and the International Center for Health Leadership Development Fellows program at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Greiner is a past-chair of the American Public Health Association’s Public Health Nursing Section and more recently served on the American Nurses Association’s Task Force on the Scope and Standards for Public Health Nursing Practice. He previously held faculty positions at the University of Pennsylvania, Villanova University, and the University of Pittsburgh.

Greiner is a Fellow of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), the national voice for nursing education programs. Dr. Greiner is participating in the 2010American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Leadership for Academic Nursing program. He is also on the AACN faculty development subcommittee, and as of November, he will be chair of the AACN organizational leadership network. AACN is the national voice for baccalaureate and higher degree programs in nursing education.

About The Lienhard School of Nursing: In response to the nationwide shortage of nurses, the Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University increased its enrollment in 2009-2010 by about 70 students, the fourth year with such an increase. In recent years it has won over $5 million in federal and private grants. Lienhard’s Family Nurse Practitioner program is ranked ninth nationally in the U.S. News & World Report survey of America’s Best Graduate Schools; last year the school added a doctoral program. Harriet R. Feldman, Ph.D., the dean, is a nurse who has emerged as a national authority on three major trends that are changing the nursing profession – the shortage of nurses and nurse educators, the involvement of nurses in promoting health policy, and the promotion of evidence-based procedures in nursing education and practice. With a Ph.D. in nursing science from New York University, she has published more than 90 books, chapters and articles and testified before Congress. In the national discussion of health care reform, she is a strong advocate of using nurse practitioners to meet the increasing need for expanding primary care delivery to focus on health promotion and maintenance and the management of chronic illness.

About Pace University: For more than 100 years, Pace University has been preparing students to become leaders in their fields. A private university, Pace provides an education that combines exceptional academics with professional experience and the New York advantage. Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and enrolls almost 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Lienhard School of Nursing Dean Harriet R. Feldman Appointed Interim Provost of Pace University

Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman announced that Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean and tenured professor of Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing since 1993, will assume the role of interim provost, effective August 1.

A collaborative leader and renowned expert in the field of nursing education, Feldman has testified before Congress, been honored for her grassroots political advocacy and written over 100 books, scholarly articles and editorials. A sought after speaker on health care and leadership, Feldman has presented at conferences worldwide.

NEW YORK, NY, July 6, 2010 – Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman has announced that Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean and tenured professor of Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing since 1993 who also served concurrently as interim dean of Pace’s School of Education (2006-10), will assume the role of interim provost, effective August 1.

“Harriet has been an invaluable member of this university, and we are grateful that she is willing to take on this responsibility until a permanent successor can be found,” said Friedman. “I know that with Harriet’s sure-handed guidance, the academic leadership is in place now to begin to make our new strategic plan’s vision – for Pace University to be considered among the very best at its mission – a reality.”

Feldman succeeds Dr. Geoffrey L. Brackett, who will be leaving Pace after 20 years (the last three as provost) to become executive vice president at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York.

Friedman paid tribute to Brackett, saying: “Geoff will be missed. He has helped start us down a path that has led to some important new directions for the University. He has overseen academic renewal across several schools and the college and the hiring of dozens of new faculty, and has brought focus and discipline to the office of the provost through difficult times. He initiated several signature programs that have heightened national recognition for Pace.”  

“This is an exciting time at Pace,” Feldman said. “Just this past week we announced the addition of two exceptionally qualified new deans, Neil Braun for the Lubin School of Business and Andrea Spencer for the School of Education, along with Sheying Chen as the new associate provost. This past year we launched the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies and formed a partnership with Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre. We had five Fulbright finalists and a winner from Lienhard. There is a great deal of momentum at Pace and I look forward to working with the president, deans, faculty, and staff to keep us moving in the right direction.”

Innovator, Researcher, Practitioner and Rainmaker

Feldman has testified in Congress and written numerous articles and letters to editors on nursing policy, becoming a nationally known figure both within her field and in the media. For her legislative work in addressing the nursing and nursing faculty shortage, she received the “STAR” award for grassroots political advocacy from the Association of American Colleges of Nursing.

She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, and past editor of the journals Nursing Leadership Forum and Scholarly Inquiry for Nursing Practice.

In the past decade, Feldman has edited or authored four award-winning books. Nurses in the Political Arena: The Public Face of Nursing (2000), with Sandra Lewenson, EdD, RN, FAAN, received an American Journal of Nursing (AJN) Book of the Year Award and a Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Print Media Award. That was soon followed by The Nursing Shortage: Strategies for Recruitment and Retention in Clinical Practice and Education (2003), Educating Nurses for Leadership (2005, with Martha J. Greenberg, PhD, RN), and Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing (2006, with Rona F. Levin, PhD, RN), all three of which also received AJN Book of the Year Awards.

Lienhard holds the distinction of being among the first institutions in the nation to receive funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) through the RWJF New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program. Grants provided through this program are being used to increase the number of students enrolled in Lienhard’s accelerated baccalaureate nursing program, the Combined Degree Program (CDP).

In 2006, Feldman was principal author of both a $1.3 million Helene Fuld Health Trust grant to support career-change Bachelor of Science nursing students and a one-year residency program, in partnership with Health and Hospitals Corporation, and a $500,000 Helene Fuld Health Trust scholarship endowment. Also under her direction, in 2005, Lienhard led a consortium of health-related institutions in New York’s Hudson Valley that won a $1.03 million U.S. Labor Department grant. The funds provide monetary credits to healthcare facilities in exchange for loaning Master’s-prepared nurses to teach clinical courses, thereby making it possible to enroll greater numbers of nursing students.  

Feldman’s extensive professional memberships include the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (Board Member: 2003 to 2010); NY/NJ Nursing Spectrum Advisory Board (Board Member, 2002 – Present); Greater New York Organization of Nurse Executives (2001 to Present); and the Eastern Nursing Research Society (1991 to Present).

Prior to joining Pace, Feldman was Chair and Professor of the Department of Nursing at Fairleigh Dickinson University. She started her teaching career at the State University of New York at Farmingdale and taught at Adelphi University. Her clinical appointments have included: Long Island College Hospital, North Shore Visiting Nurse Service, and Long Island Jewish Medical Center.

Feldman received her BS and MS degrees in nursing from Adelphi University and her PhD in nursing science from New York University.  She and her husband live in Bellmore, New York.

A national search for a permanent provost will begin in the Fall, with a candidate to be announced in Spring 2011.  

On June 27, Pace announced three new additions to its academic leadership team effective July 1. Neil Braun, former president of NBC Television Network and CEO of Viacom Entertainment, and current CEO of The CarbonNeutral Company, is the new dean of the Lubin School of Business. Andrea (Penny) M. Spencer, PhD, the new dean of the School of Education, joined from Bank Street College where she was the associate dean for academic affairs. Sheying Chen, PhD, is the new associate provost, previously associate vice chancellor for academic affairs at Indiana University, Southeast.

About Pace University: For more than 100 years, Pace University has been preparing students to become leaders in their fields. A private university, Pace provides an education that combines exceptional academics with professional experience and the New York advantage. Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and enrolls almost 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Future Nurses from Pace University Lobby Policymakers on Healthcare Issues

Nurses often speak out on behalf of their patients to ensure they get the best possible care, improving the lives of many people, one at a time. But nurses are also a powerful group when they get together to advocate on the local and national level to improve the healthcare system for all of us.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts: Cara Cea, 914-773-3312 or ccea@pace.edu; Sharon Lewis, 914-773-3973 or slewis2@pace.edu

FUTURE NURSES FROM PACE UNIVERSITY LOBBY POLICYMAKERS ON HEALTHCARE ISSUES

Urge State Legislature to support nursing education, safe staffing ratios, punish violence against nurses, and require safe patient handling policies. Photos available upon request.

Albany, New York, April 21, 2010 — Nurses often speak out on behalf of their patients to ensure they get the best possible care, improving the lives of many people, one at a time. But nurses are also a powerful group when they get together to advocate on the local and national level to improve the healthcare system for all of us.

That was an important lesson that senior Amanda Schultz, along with about 50 other students from Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, learned yesterday, when they attended the New York State Nurses Association‘s (NYSNA) annual Lobby Day at the State Capitol in Albany, taking part in public policy discussions with legislators and their aides. Lienhard students had the opportunity to meet with Assembly Members Robert Castelli and Deborah Glick, and aides for Assembly Member Jonathan Bing, Senators Andrea Stewart-Cousins, Suzi Oppenheimer, and Daniel Squadron.

The students talked with their legislators about a range of issues, from violence against nurses to safe staffing ratios to funding for nursing education programs. Schultz was particularly concerned about the issue of safety in the workplace. She said, “Statistics are stunning. According to the Department of Justice, nearly 500,000 nurses per year are victims of violent crimes in the workplace. When I am a full time nurse next year, the last thing I want to have to deal with is a violent patient. The proper protections need to be in place to keep nurses safe.”

NYSNA has written a memo of support for a bill that would add attacks on RNs or LPNs to the same class of assault as attacks on police officers, firefighters, and EMTs. The memo says that the frequency with which nurses are assaulted has led to an accepted and inappropriate belief that violence is to be expected in a healthcare environment and should be considered “part of the job.”

Lienhard School of Nursing students were accompanied to Albany by two of their faculty — Assistant Professor Andrea Sonenberg, NP, CNM, DNSc, and Clinical Instructor Ann Marie Bova, MSN, RN.

In addition to addressing violence against nurses, the students and their faculty are also advocating for safe staffing ratios, which result in safer care with improved patient outcomes, an improved workplace environment that will attract and retain nurses, and higher job satisfaction for nurses.

“I support the Safe Staffing for Quality Care Act,” said Sonenberg, who has been practicing for 24 years. “In my experience, an appropriate staff assignment, taking into account not just number of patients but acuity as well, results in better patient outcomes and satisfaction. Additionally, nurse satisfaction and retention are more likely to be optimal. If we don’t address this issue, the nursing shortage will only become more acute and a risk to patient safety.”

Nurses and future nurses are also advocating on measures affecting education of nurses. Proposed legislation would require registered professional nurses to attain bachelor’s degrees in nursing within ten years of their initial licensure. The legislation is modeled after an education requirement for public school teachers in New York State to earn a master’s within five years of initial certification. Bachelor’s degree programs provide additional emphasis on key areas of nursing theory and the use of evidence-based practice in nursing, according to NYSNA. Furthermore, BSN students are exposed to settings and areas of practice that are not generally part of associate degree programs, such as public health, home care, and various outpatient settings. The BSN curriculum also provides students with leadership skills that help them supervise and monitor dependent practitioners. According to Dean and Professor Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, “Nurses are lifelong learners, and every nurse should have a bachelor’s degree at a minimum. Although an associate degree provides a beginning foundation for practice, the evidence supports that there are fewer patient errors in health care environments that have a predominance of BS nurses, and patient safety is a high priority in patient care.”

According to Raymond Ng, president of Student Nurses at Pace (SNAP) on the New York City campus of Pace University, “Lobby Day really opened my eyes to how nurses can influence policy to improve care. I feel so empowered and energized from this experience; we talked to our policymakers, and they really listened.”

This Lobby Day event was organized by NYSNA, and approximately 2,200 nurses and future nurses attended. Professor Sonenberg said, “Advocacy is a critical process when it comes to improving our health care system, and as both current and future nurses, we are uniquely positioned to inform legislators on critical issues affecting the nation’s health and have a professional responsibility to make our voices heard.” Bova agreed saying, “This is an excellent learning experience for both the legislators and the students, and the result will be a more educated electorate and healthcare improvements.”

About Pace University: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Professor Karen “Toby” Haghenbeck Honored for 30 Years of Service as a Critical Care Nurse

Toby Haghenbeck, Assistant Professor at Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University in Pleasantville, NY recently received national recognition for reaching a significant milestone in the nursing profession: Since 1979 she has consistently maintained CCRN® certification offered through AACN Certification Corporation. Toby Haghenbeck is one of 108 CCRNs being honored this year by the corporation and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses for 30 years of continuous certification.

Posted on behalf of The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY FACULTY MEMBER RECOGNIZED FOR CAREER MILESTONE AS CRITICAL CARE NURSE

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, August 10, 2009 – Toby Haghenbeck, Assistant Professor at Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University in Pleasantville, NY recently received national recognition for reaching a significant milestone in the nursing profession: Since 1979 she has consistently maintained CCRN® certification offered through AACN Certification Corporation. Toby Haghenbeck is one of 108 CCRNs being honored this year by the corporation and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses for 30 years of continuous certification.

CCRN certification is an expert credential reserved for those who meet rigorous practice, continuing education and testing requirements in their specialty; it is not the same as an RN license, which assures the public that a nurse has the required entry-level knowledge and skills to care for patients. Certification has been linked to fewer medical errors and increased job satisfaction and confidence. Hospitals that encourage and support their nurses in becoming certified demonstrate to their patients a high level of commitment to creating an exceptional care environment and, to their nurses, a culture of professionalism and retention imperative in today’s healthcare environment.

Professor Haghenbeck has also been appointed as Director of the RN4 program at Lienhard, effective fall 2009. The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) is the largest specialty nursing organization in the world, representing the interests of more than 400,000 critical care nurses. Its international headquarters are located in Aliso Viejo, Calif. Founded in 1969, the association has more than 240 chapters worldwide and is working toward a healthcare system driven by the needs of patients and their families, where critical care nurses make their optimal contribution. Complete information about AACN is available on the Internet at www.aacn.org.

AACN Certification Corporation provides comprehensive credentials for nurses who establish and maintain standards of excellence in acute and critical care nursing and who contribute to the achievement of optimal health outcomes for persons experiencing acute and life-threatening illness. The Corporation certifies more than 50,000 nurses in the areas of acute and critical care nursing.

Thirty Pace University Nursing Students to Get Scholarships With Commitment to Work in NYC Hospitals

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing and the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) today announced a $1.3 million program to provide nursing scholarships for 30 individuals in exchange for a commitment to work at an HHC facility for four years.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Cara Halstead, Public Information Officer, Pace University
914-773-3312 Office, 914-906-9680 Cell, chalstead@pace.edu
Ana Marengo, NYC HHC, 212-788-3386

Note: The first students accepted are available for interviews.

THIRTY PACE UNIVERSITY NURSING STUDENTS TO GET FREE TUITION IN EXCHANGE FOR FOUR YEAR COMMITMENT TO PRACTICE
IN NEW YORK CITY PUBLIC HOSPITALS

$1.3 million grant from Helene Fuld Health Trust, HSBC Bank USA, N.A., Trustee, will tap professionals who change careers to address critical nursing shortage

Program accelerates growing trend

NEW YORK, NY, May 14, 2007 – Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing and the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) today announced a $1.3 million program to provide nursing scholarships for 30 individuals in exchange for a commitment to work at an HHC facility for four years.

The program is designed to quickly move nursing graduates into the profession and serve as a model for addressing the national nursing shortage. It is the city’s first nursing program that will offer a residency program and include a service commitment to the public hospitals.

The program is funded by a $1.3 million grant to Pace from the Helene Fuld Health Trust, HSBC Bank USA, N.A., Trustee, the nation’s largest private funder devoted exclusively to nursing students and nursing education.

Scholarship grants worth $40,000 will be given to men and women who want to change careers, already have a bachelor’s degree, and can earn their undergraduate nursing degree in one year under Pace University’s combined degree program (CDP). The first ten students will begin their residencies this fall.

“The scholarship money can be a life-saver to some of these people, since many of them need to quit their jobs to complete the CDP within a year,” said Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean of Pace’s Lienhard School. “They generally are not eligible for many federal financial aid programs because they already have baccalaureate degrees.”

A Model that Works in Teaching. The scholarships cover tuition, and then a one-year paid Registered Nurse (RN) residency program with options to focus on critical care, specialty nursing, long term care and geriatrics.

The graduate RNs will conduct their residencies at HHC’s Coler Goldwater Specialty Hospital and Nursing Facility in Manhattan, Harlem Hospital Center in Manhattan, Woodhull Medical and Mental Health Center in Brooklyn, and Jacobi Medical Center in the Bronx. After the initial residency program, the RNs will work at HHC for an additional three years.

“We have seen successful incentive programs that recruit professionals to the teaching profession in exchange for a commitment to our city’s kids. Why not do the same to encourage talented individuals to consider nursing as a career with a promise to serve the 1.3 million patients who rely on the city’s public hospitals and nursing homes?” said Marie L. Ankner, MSN, RN, CNAA, Assistant Vice President of nursing for medical and professional affairs at HHC.

She added: “This effort is a true collaboration between a healthcare system and academia and is a win-win for all since it guarantees the hospitals a pool of employees while it assists students and institutions of higher education. We expect this program to be easily replicated by others who want to have an immediate impact on the nursing shortage.” (The US Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates a national need of 1.2 million new and replacement nurses by the year 2014.)

Trend to similar partnerships. Collaborative programs like this recently have gained momentum nationwide as an answer to the nursing shortage, with more and more partnerships forming to support these students. According to the website of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, a health care system such as HHC could spend more than $3 million in nurse recruitment costs over a three year period just to recruit the necessary number of qualified healthcare workers. The grant from the Helene Fuld Health Trust saves HHC some of that cost and increases the supply of qualified workers.

In addition to the $1.3 million grant, the Trust also has awarded Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing a $550,000 endowment, payable over the next three years, to be used for 10 scholarships of $2,500 a year to other students in the school’s CDP. Previous funding from the Helene Fuld Health Trust has benefited Pace students in programs including the Family Nurse Practitioner program.

Applicants for the grants may contact Sophie Kaufman, Administrative Director of the Center for Nursing Research, Clinical Practice and International Affairs at the Lienhard School of Nursing, Pace University, 861 Bedford Road, LH 314, Pleasantville, NY 10570, (914) 773-3336, skaufman@pace.edu.

Partnership members. For more than 100 years Pace University has been preparing students to become leaders in their fields by providing an education that combines exceptional academics with professional experience and the New York advantage. Pace has three campuses, in New York City, Westchester, and White Plains. A private metropolitan university, Pace enrolls nearly 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing (LSN) has been preparing nurses for more than 40 years and was one of the first in the nation to implement a special program for career changers over 30 years ago. With more than 600 students enrolled in baccalaureate and master’s degree programs, all approved by the New York State Education Department and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, LSN partners with communities to foster human growth and dignity and provide primary care. The School of Nursing is devoted to preparing individuals, families, and communities at local, national, and international levels, to meet health care demands now and in the future. For inquiries about the nursing programs at Pace, please email nursing@pace.edu, or call (914) 773-3552. www.pace.edu

Dating back to a foundation created in 1935 by Dr. Leonhard Felix Fuld and his sister, Florentine, in honor of their mother, Helene, the Helene Fuld Health Trust since 1969 has been overseen and administered by HSBC Bank USA, N.A.

The New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC), the largest municipal hospital and health care system in the country, is a $4.9 billion public benefit corporation that serves 1.3 million New Yorkers and about 400,000 who are uninsured. HHC provides medical, mental health and substance abuse services through its 11 acute care hospitals, four skilled nursing facilities, six large diagnostic and treatment centers and more than 80 community based health centers. For more information about HHC, visit www.nyc.gov/hhc.

Free Program at Pace to Encourage Middle School Students to Consider Healthcare Careers

The 2006 Summer Scholars Program for Nursing and Health Careers is a new initiative designed to encourage middle school students (in 6th, 7th and 8th grades) in Westchester County to explore nursing and health care as career choices as well as to increase awareness of personal health and to promote wellness in these students. This program originated as a long term solution to the regional and national nursing shortage crisis.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Cara Halstead, Office of Public Information,
Pace University, 914-773-3312, Cell: 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu

WESTCHESTER MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS OFFERED CHANCE TO PARTICIPATE IN NURSING AND HEALTH CAREERS EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM FREE OF CHARGE

Information session Wed., Feb. 1: Program designed to entice middle school students into careers in healthcare; could serve as model for other schools to replicate nationwide

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, January 24, 2006 – The 2006 Summer Scholars Program for Nursing and Health Careers is a new initiative designed to encourage middle school students (in 6th, 7th and 8th grades) in Westchester County to explore nursing and health care as career choices as well as to increase awareness of personal health and to promote wellness in these students. This program originated as a long term solution to the regional and national nursing shortage crisis.

Because the program is made possible through a grant awarded to Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing (LSN), there is no charge for any component of it. The grant is funded by the Department of Health and Human Services and the Health Resources and Services Administration through the efforts of Congresswoman Nita M. Lowey (NY-18).

“We see this program as just one step toward alleviating the national nursing and nursing faculty shortage,” said Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean of LSN. “We’d like to inspire and encourage students early on, so that health care is a top of mind career choice as they enter their decision-making years.”

There are three components of the program to take place this year. The first are information sessions – in the winter and spring, a spring break trip to Washington, DC and a summer camp.

Information sessions on nursing and healthcare careers
Middle school students who are interested in health careers are invited to attend the first information session on Wednesday, February 1st, from 5pm – 7pm on the Pleasantville campus of Pace University, 861 Bedford Rd., entrance 3, Kessel Campus Center, Butcher Suite. On Wednesday, May 3rd, the second information session will be held from 5pm – 7pm, in the same location.

WHO: For Westchester middle school students
WHAT: First information session of 2006 Summer Scholars Program for Nursing and Health Careers
WHEN: Wednesday, February 1st from 5pm – 7pm
WHERE: Pleasantville campus of Pace University, 861 Bedford Rd., entrance 3, Kessel Campus Center, Butcher Suite

The first session will feature a local Physical Therapist, a Pace Athletic Trainer and an Orthopedic Nurse from Phelps Memorial Hospital. Each session will also be attended by members of Student Nurses at Pace, so attendees will have the opportunity to talk about nursing school with students currently enrolled.

Space is limited, so students and their parents who would like to attend the February 1st Information Session should RSVP by calling Cira Raciti at 914-773-3322 or via e-mail at nursing @pace.edu by 1/27/06. Those who would like to attend the May 3rd information session should RSVP on or before 4/26/06.

Spring break trip to Washington, DC
A six day course will be offered during spring break, leaving Friday, April 7 and returning Wednesday, April 12. During their stay, the students will visit the Department of Health and Human Services to learn about federally funded scholarships for careers in nursing and health care, tour a military hospital and base where they will hear about scholarship opportunities in the armed services and visit Congresswoman Nita Lowey’s office. Throughout the trip, students will maintain a digital journal using personal digital assistants (PDA’s).

Summer camp
This week long summer day camp for middle school students, called Summer Scholars Program for Nursing and Health Care Careers, will take place on Pace’s Pleasantville campus. Each camper will participate in one five day camp session either Week 1 or Week 2. It will focus on careers in nursing and health care as well as personal health and wellness.

Career options will be explored throughout the week through sessions with health care providers, on-line research, and field trips to health care facilities, helping students envision healthcare careers that they might be interested in pursuing as they prepare for high school and college.

The program will encompass all six dimensions of health: physical, social, emotional, spiritual, occupational, and intellectual. Physical fitness activities, meditation, and healthy eating will be on the daily program, along with a special appearance by an organization such as Mad Science® (www.madscience.org) to stimulate critical thinking. Throughout the week, campers will have time in the computer classroom to participate in electronic activities using distance learning technology.

Each camper will be given a PDA with digital camera/video camera. They will be required to maintain a digital journal of their experiences and to monitor their personal goals for wellness.
Students will be asked to create web pages related to “Healthy Workforce 2015,” the theme of the program. The campers will share their web pages on the final day and discuss what career choices they might now be considering. Graduates of the program will be given their PDA’s to keep.

How are the students for the spring break trip and summer camp selected?
All middle school students in Westchester County are eligible. Acceptance into the programs is competitive, and preference will be given to those applications that are complete and submitted by Feb. 28 for the spring break trip and May 31 for the summer camp. Up to 20 students will be selected for both the spring break trip and the summer camp. Selection criteria include interest in: nursing and healthcare careers and personal health and wellness; proficiency in science and math, computer skills.
Set within culturally diverse urban and suburban settings, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing (LSN) is committed to innovation and excellence in education, research, and practice in primary health care. With more than 600 students enrolled in baccalaureate and master’s degree programs, all approved by the New York State Education Department and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, LSN partners with communities to foster human growth and dignity and provide primary care. The School of Nursing is devoted to preparing individuals, families, and communities at local, national, and international levels, to meet health care demands now and in the future. For inquiries about the nursing programs at Pace, please email nursing@pace.edu, or call (914) 773-3552. www.pace.edu

Founded in 1906, Pace University educates achievers who are engaged with critical issues both locally and globally. Known for its outcome-oriented environment that prepares students to succeed in a wide-range of professions, Pace has three campuses, including New York City (downtown and lower Manhattan), Westchester (Pleasantville, Briarcliff, and the White Plains Graduate Center), and the Pace School of Law in White Plains. The Pace Hudson Valley Center is located in Orange County New York. A private metropolitan university, Pace enrolls more than 14,000 students in undergraduate, masters, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Ivan G. Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, and School of Education. Visit Pace University at www.pace.edu.

Rep. Nita Lowey to be Honored Monday With Pace’s Dean Feldman for Leadership in Nursing Education

Monday, January 23 at 10:45 am, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) will honor Congresswoman Nita Lowey in her White Plains district office to recognize her outstanding leadership on behalf of nursing education and research.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact:
Cara Halstead Cea, Public Information, Pace University
914-773-3313 (Office), 914-906-9680 (Cell) chalstead@pace.edu

CONGRESSWOMAN NITA LOWEY TO BE HONORED MONDAY
FOR LEADERSHIP ON BEHALF OF NURSING EDUCATION AND RESEARCH

Editors’ note: Lowey will be available for questions and photos after the ceremony.

WHAT: Monday, January 23 at 10:45 am, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) will honor Congresswoman Nita Lowey in her White Plains district office to recognize her outstanding leadership on behalf of nursing education and research.

Also honored will be Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, Dean of the Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University in New York, who is receiving the “Grassroots Star” award from AACN for grassroots advocacy to solve the nationwide nursing and nursing faculty shortage.

WHEN: Monday, January 23 at 10:45am
WHERE: Lowey’s district office, 222 Mamaroneck Ave., Suite 310, White Plains, NY 10605, 914-428-1707

Potential issues for discussion
The latest developments in New York State regarding nursing education and the nursing shortage are expected to be discussed by Lowey and the nursing administrators and faculty members at the event is Part of this discussion will likely include the NEED Act, which is legislation that would help nursing schools nationwide expand their enrollments and resolve the national nursing shortage. (See attached file: Bill Summary.doc for more information on the NEED Act.) Lowey is on the Appropriations Subcommittee of Labor Health Human Services and Education and may be asked questions about funding for health and education programs next year.

Lowey also is interested in a variety of health and human services issues such as pandemic flu, food allergies, disaster preparedness, school safety, the environment, nuclear power, as well as the nursing shortage.
Lowey has worked to secure funding for nursing education, in New York State and nationwide, through her seat on the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Subcommittee as well as through the introduction of the Nurse Education, Expansion, and Development (NEED) Act with colleagues Lois Capps and Peter King.
Presenting the award to Lowey on behalf of AACN will be Feldman and Glenda Kelman, Ph.D., Chair of the Department of Nursing at Sage College in Albany.
Set within culturally diverse urban and suburban settings, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing (LSN) is committed to innovation and excellence in education, research, and practice in primary health care. With more than 600 students enrolled in baccalaureate and master’s degree programs, all approved by the New York State Education Department and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, LSN partners with communities to foster human growth and dignity and provide primary care. The School of Nursing is devoted to preparing individuals, families, and communities at local, national, and international levels, to meet health care demands now and in the future. For inquiries about the nursing programs at Pace, please email nursing@pace.edu, or call (914) 773-3552.
Founded in 1906, Pace University educates achievers who are engaged with critical issues both locally and globally. Known for its outcome-oriented environment that prepares students to succeed in a wide-range of professions, Pace has three campuses, including New York City (downtown and lower Manhattan), Westchester (Pleasantville, Briarcliff, and the White Plains Graduate Center), and the Pace School of Law in White Plains. The Pace Hudson Valley Center is located in Orange County New York. A private metropolitan university, Pace enrolls more than 14,000 students in undergraduate, masters, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Ivan G. Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, and School of Education. Visit Pace University at www.pace.edu.

U.S. Secretary of Labor Elaine L. Chao Visits Pace University to Present $1 Million Nursing Grant

U.S. Secretary of Labor Elaine L. Chao today announced a grant of $1,048,300 to the Orange County Workforce Investment Board (WIB) in New York. The grantee is one of 12 winners selected from nearly 230 applicants competing for funding under the President’s High Growth Job Training Initiative. A total of more than $12 million is being awarded nationwide to address opportunities to build a world-class health care and biotechnology workforce.

The following news release is from the US Department of Labor:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DOL Contacts:
David James 202-693-4676, Mike Volpe 202-693-3984

Pace Contact:
Cara Halstead 914-906-9680

U.S. Secretary of Labor Elaine L. Chao Visits Pace University To Present $1 Million Grant to Workforce Investment Board

New York Grantee is One of 12 Nationwide Sharing $12 Million
For Health Care and Biotechnology Training Projects

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y.—U.S. Secretary of Labor Elaine L. Chao today announced a grant of $1,048,300 to the Orange County Workforce Investment Board (WIB) in New York. The grantee is one of 12 winners selected from nearly 230 applicants competing for funding under the President’s High Growth Job Training Initiative. A total of more than $12 million is being awarded nationwide to address opportunities to build a world-class health care and biotechnology workforce.

“Health care and biotechnology are two of the fastest growing industries,” said Secretary of Labor Elaine L. Chao. “This $1 million grant to the Orange County WIB, like the other 11 projects funded through this competition, will help workers prepare for careers in professions that are in high demand.”

The Orange County WIB will form a consortium with area health care, education and training providers to address nursing faculty shortages which have limited enrollment in local nursing programs, a situation which has led to shortfalls in skilled nurses and health care professionals.

As a result of this project, 50 nurses will be trained as instructors; 100 nurses will be trained as mentors; 70 nurses will be trained as adjunct instructors; and 1,000 students will be admitted to health care education and training programs. Key project partners include the Northern Metropolitan Hospital Association, Pace University – which will do all faculty training – and seven WIBs that comprise the Southern/Mid-Hudson Valley.

“Regional partnerships among employers, educators, and the workforce investment system will be the key to meeting businesses’ demand for workers with the skills to succeed in the competitive, global economy,” said Assistant Secretary of Labor for Employment and Training Emily Stover DeRocco.

Of the 12 grants awarded as a result of a Sept. 17, 2004, Department of Labor Solicitation for Grant Applications, four will fund biotechnology industry training, six will fund health care industry training, and two projects will provide cross-industry training. Additional information about the grants, which will advance projects in Arizona, California, Florida, Indiana, Michigan, New York, South Carolina, Texas, Utah and Wisconsin, will be available Tuesday, June 7.

Through the President’s High Growth Job Training Initiative, the Department of Labor has been conducting executive forums with leaders of expanding industries to identify critical workforce gaps and issues. Solutions are competitively chosen and are carried out in cooperation with employers, educational institutions and the public workforce system. For more information, visit www.doleta.gov/BRG/JobTrainInitiative.

Dean of Nursing Testifies in Washington on Nursing and Faculty Shortage

Today Harriet Feldman, Dean and Professor of the Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University, located in Westchester County and New York City, New York, addressed the U.S. House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services and Education on the nationwide shortage of registered nurses and the underlying shortage of nurse faculty.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Halstead, Office of Public Information,
Pace University, 914-773-3312, Cell: 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY’S DEAN OF NURSING ADDRESSES CONGRESS ON NATIONWIDE SHORTAGE OF REGISTERED NURSES

Testimony presented before the U.S. House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services and Education

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, April 21, 2005 – Today Harriet Feldman, Dean and Professor of the Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University, located in Westchester County and New York City, New York, addressed the U.S. House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services and Education on the nationwide shortage of registered nurses and the underlying shortage of nurse faculty.

Speaking on behalf of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), Feldman’s testimony echoed AACN’s recommendations for increased funding to existing nursing education programs. Budget increases for the Nursing Workforce Development Programs may also boost pre-doctoral, doctoral, and post-doctoral education for nurses nationwide. Feldman’s testimony also presented solutions to growing problems associated with the Nurse Education, Expansion, and Development Act (NEED Act), sponsored by Reps. Nita Lowey (D-NY) and Lois Capps (D-CA).
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She noted that a bleak budget situation for health and education programs could lead to increased problems in the future. “Without a sufficient number of registered nurses, patient safety is compromised,” Feldman said.

Citing figures from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, Feldman said that the US will need an additional 1.1 million new and replacement registered nurses by 2012. “Nursing is the fastest growing occupation, yet according to the Health Resources and Services Administration our nation will still be roughly 800,000 nurses short in 2020 unless there is a significant and sustained increase in the number of nurses graduating each year and entering the workforce,” Feldman said.

“At Pace University our enrollments are higher than the national average,” Feldman continued. “For example, our fall 2004 enrollments were increased over the prior fall by 35%; this spring we enrolled 36% more students, 109 people, than we did in spring 2004. It is still not enough since some sources claim that we must increase enrollments by at least 40% annually to be effective.”

She explained that without enough qualified applicants for vacant faculty positions, it is impossible to accept additional students into nursing programs. “Compounding the shrinking pool of eligible faculty candidates is an aging nursing faculty, noncompetitive faculty salaries, and budget pressures within individual academic institutions,” Feldman said.

Statistics covered in Feldman’s testimony include:
• AACN reported that in fall 2004, almost 33,000 qualified applicants to nursing undergraduate and graduate programs were turned away, nearly double those of the prior fall. In the US there are approximately 1,500 schools of nursing, all working to expand enrollments, most without sufficient faculty to educate the growing numbers of students.
• AACN estimates that if the current faculty vacancy rate holds steady, the deficit of nurse faculty will swell to over 2,600 unfilled positions in 2012.

Possible solutions in Feldman’s testimony include:
• Budget increases. Feldman proposes a budget increase of $25 million for 2006 (bringing the total to $175 million) for the Nursing Workforce Development Programs.
• Additional funding for the Nurse Faculty Loan Program. The Nurse Faculty Loan Program provides grants to colleges of nursing to support full-time master’s and doctoral nursing students—future nurse faculty. Up to 85% of these students’ educational loans may be cancelled over a 4-year period if they agree to teach at a school of nursing. If funding doubles to almost $10 million, colleges of nursing could educate over 800 future faculty who could, in turn, educate over 8,000 future nurses each year.
• Approval of the NEED Act. The NEED Act is a capitation grant program for schools of nursing sponsored by Congresswoman Nita Lowey (D-NY) that would provide accredited schools of nursing with a fixed dollar amount for each enrolled student.

Feldman’s complete oral testimony is available on the AACN Web site at http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Government/Testimony/Feldman.htm.

For more information on AACN’s legislative strategies related to Nursing Workforce Development programs, see http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Government/Docs/TitleVIIIFY06.DOC.
Set within culturally diverse urban and suburban settings, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing (LSN) is committed to innovation and excellence in education, research, and practice in primary health care. With more than 600 students enrolled in baccalaureate and master’s degree programs, all approved by the New York State Education Department and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, LSN partners with communities to foster human growth and dignity and provide primary care. The School of Nursing is devoted to preparing individuals, families, and communities at local, national, and international levels, to meet health care demands now and in the future.
A private university in the New York Metropolitan area, Pace has a growing national reputation for offering students opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. Approximately 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. For inquiries about the nursing programs at Pace, email nursing@pace.edu, or call (914) 773-3552. www.pace.edu