Associated Press: “New Miami Art Museum renamed after big donation”

The new Miami Art Museum is being renamed as a result of a major donation. In an interview with the Associated Press, Rebecca Tekula, Ph.D., Executive Director of the Helene and Grant Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University, spoke on what the impact of this might be and whether a name can make or break a new museum. Tekula has taught cultural and arts management at the graduate level in Switzerland and also has background in fundraising in the U.S.

When the new Miami Art Museum opens in 2013, it will also have a different name: The Jorge M. Perez Art Museum of Miami-Dade County.

Perez, chairman and CEO of the Related Group, whose condominium developments have helped reshape the Miami skyline, has pledged $35 million to the museum, including $20 million in cash and $15 million in art from his personal collection.

So what impact, if any, will the renaming of the museum have?

The Miami Art Museum won’t be the first to carry the name of an important benefactor, though it does appear to be one of the largest public art museums to carry a donor’s name. Naming after donors tends to be more common at university galleries. Usually when an art museum takes the name of a donor, it’s because nearly all of the permanent collection belongs to the donor, said Rebecca Tekula, Ph.D., Executive Director of the Helene and Grant Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University, in an Associated Press interview.

Tekula said the donation is encouraging at a time when the arts have been hard hit by the economic downturn, though she and others cautioned that artwork valued at $15 million today may not be worth that in the future.

“$15 million doesn’t always get you that far,” Tekula said.

Interest.com: “6 ways to make giving to charity work for you”

Your mother always taught you to share with others. Yet, it’s often difficult to choose a charity and to know when to give, how much to give and when to move on to another cause. Pace’s Dr. Rebecca Tekula advises why it is important to “do your research” before giving back.

Interest.com, a Bankrate website which claims a readership of 500,000 monthly, helps consumers make smart decisions about almost every aspect of their financial lives, including donating to a cause they care about.

Rebecca Tekula, executive director of the Helene and Grant Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University in New York, advocates using online resources to determine which charities really deserve your money.

Tip 5. Do your research.

Tekula suggests that people look at their philanthropic investments in the same way they’d view other investments.

You’re not only investing your funds, you also need to consider long-term expectations.

In addition to investigating a cause’s website, Tekula shares some of her favorite online resources for researching charities:

Guidestar — This is a great starting-off point and fundamental resource for analyzing facts, including tax returns and salaries.
Charity Navigator — This website uses a star system based on evolving and sophisticated fundamentals of the organizations. A great resource for the financially savvy reader that looks at the charities the way you look at a business, based on return on philanthropic investment, return on social investment.
GiveWell — The next step in evaluating a charity, according to Tekula, the top-rated charities it recommends are proven, cost effective, underfunded and outstanding.

To read all “6 ways to make giving to charity work for you” – click here 

BroadwayWorld – “Pace University Confronts the AIDS Crisis with Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS”

No “Humbug” This Season.

Just like Scrooge decided to give money to the less fortunate after his eye opening journey with the three ghosts, “A Christmas Carol” Director Grant Kretchik along with his cast of over 40 will fundraise after each of their eight shows and donate the money to Broadway Cares/ Equity Fights AIDS.

BC/ EFA is an organization that has raised over $195 million dollars since 1988 to provide people living with AIDS, as well as other critical illnesses, necessary services and care.

“This was the first organization that was even mentioned as an option for our fundraising,” says Tommy McKiernan, a cast member. “It’s a charity that was born right out of the theater community and benefits a cause that is a major health problem not only in the United States, but all around the world. It was a no brainer.”

Bethany Xan Jeffery, who plays Ebenezer Scrooge’s diligent housekeeper -Mrs. Dilber in “A Christmas Carol,” wrote the article on the inspiration behind Pace confronting the AIDS crisis that got picked up by BroadwayWorld –broadwayworld.com/article/Pace_University_Confronts_the_AIDS_Crisis_With_BCEFA_20101130#ixzz16nw5A4YB

Wrote Jeffery:

“HIV/ AIDS is a rapidly growing disease that is plaguing the world and if we don’t help the government by raising money to fund the research ourselves, then who knows when it will cease consuming millions of lives. You can help by donating to Broadway Cares/ Equity Fights Aids at www.broadwaycares.org or any of the HIV/ AIDS charity organizations.  All it took was one person to contact BC/ EFA from Pace University to organize a major effort against the AIDS crisis. It could be you.”

“It’s Time” … To Announce Results of Pace University’s Largest and Most Successful Fundraising Effort

Pace University has concluded the most ambitious fundraising effort in its 104-year history. It’s Time: The Centennial Campaign for Pace University was publicly launched on April 24, 2007 with a goal of $100 million. Pace raised $101,096,941 in cash and pledges since the campaign’s inception in 2003.

Media Contact: Samuella Becker, Pace Public Information, 212-346-1637 or 917-734-5172, Sbecker2@pace.edu

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

“It’s Time” … To Announce Results of Pace University’s Largest and Most Successful Fundraising Effort

  • Pace Raises $101 Million
  • Student Financial Aid Top Priority with $21 Million Raised for Scholarships
  • $15 Million Gift Establishes Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems
  • 16 Single Gifts of $1 Million +
  • 6,417 First-Time Donors

NEW YORK, July 26, 2010 – Pace University has concluded the most ambitious fundraising effort in its 104-year history.

It’s Time: The Centennial Campaign for Pace University was publicly launched on April 24, 2007 with a goal of $100 million. “Since the start of the campaign, more than 16,813 individuals and organizations – including 12,365 alumni – have stepped forward to make critical investments in the school,” said Pace President Stephen J. Friedman. “This is truly inspiring and a vote of confidence in the University!”

Pace raised $101,096,941 in cash and pledges since the campaign’s inception in 2003. “The fact that we had reached the goal was first publicly announced on April 29th at our 47th Leaders in Management Awards dinner, which honored David J. Pecker, President and CEO of American Media, and Gurbaksh Chahal, Founder and CEO of gWallet,” said Christine Meola, Pace Vice President of Development and Alumni Relations.

Ivan G. Seidenberg (MBA ’81), chairman of the board and chief executive officer of Verizon Communications, donated the largest gift in Pace’s history, $15 million, which was awarded to the School of Computer Science and Information Systems in October 2005. One-third of his naming gift will support the Seidenberg Scholars Program, a program dedicated to recruiting and supporting top computing students from across the country. Seidenberg, a member of the Pace Board of Trustees, chaired the It’s Time campaign and led the 17-member Campaign Executive Committee.

Other noteworthy naming gifts:

  • The Dyson Foundation awarded Dyson College a gift of $7.5 million.  $5 million was directed to the renovation of the science labs on the Pleasantville Campus, $2 million funds scholarships in psychology, communications and media, performing arts, fine arts, and environmental science and environmental studies, and $500,000 created the Dyson Student Opportunities Fund, which funds special activities for students.  This was the largest of the gifts marking the Foundation’s 50th Anniversary and reflects a partnership between the Dyson family and Pace that began 75 years ago in 1930 when Charles H. Dyson graduated.  Dyson became a pioneer in leveraged buyouts, was founder of the privately held investment firm Dyson-Kissner-Moran, undertook government assignments during the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt, and served as Chairman of Pace’s Board of Trustees.
  • The Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship was launched with a $5 million pledge from Helene (BBA ’66) and Grant Wilson, Boston-area entrepreneurs and philanthropists whose involvement with nonprofit organizations has convinced them that more entrepreneurial management can help these organizations increase their impact.
  • The Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Foundation made a gift of $2 million toward the Pforzheimer Honors College Endowment.  The Pforzheimer family has made many contributions to the betterment of Pace University over the past 47 years. The investment banker Carl H. Pforzheimer III is a trustee emeritus and was chair of the board from 1990 to 1999; his mother, Carol, a trustee emerita, served on the board from 1973 to 1979.

Additional Campaign highlights:

  • Trustees of Pace have collectively contributed more than $23 million to date, demonstrating their bold leadership and commitment to this historic effort.
  • 16 single gifts of $1 million or more, reflecting Pace’s ability to inspire gifts of remarkable generosity.
  • 6,417 first-time donors to the University, including 4,360 alumni who contributed $35.6 million.
  • $21 million raised for scholarships
  • $800,000 earmarked for Pace’s Division II sports programs, including scholarships and capital improvements to athletic facilities
  • An earlier Pace campaign, launched in 1995 and concluded in 2000, raised $61 million over a five-year period. The goal of that campaign was $55 million.

What’s next?  According to Friedman, “The conclusion of the Centennial Campaign doesn’t mean the end of our efforts to seek support to make Pace a better university. On the contrary, it signals another new beginning.  Our graduates are making a difference in every field and profession, ranging from the arts to business to healthcare to environmental law. Thus we will continue to press forward as we seek support for implementing the vision laid out in our new Strategic Plan … and moving Pace to a new level of excellence over the next five years.”

About Pace: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu