Forbes: “Multi-generational Households: Surprise, It’s Not Necessarily A Nightmare”

Living with mom and dad, again, isn’t half bad. So shows the latest data from Pew Research Center. Among the three-in-ten of those surveyed, ages 25-34 who’ve had to shuffle back home during the Great Recession, nearly 80 percent of them say things are working out and they are optimistic about their financial future.

A Pew Research analysis of Census Bureau data shows that the share of Americans living in multi-generational family households is the highest it has been since the 1950s, having increased significantly in the past five years,

Adults ages 25-34 are among the most likely to be living in multi-generational households (mostly with their parents). In 2010, 21.6 percent lived this way, up from 15.8 percent in 2000, reports Forbes Contributor Sheryl Nance-Nash, in the article “Multi-generational Households: Surprise, It’s Not Necessarily A Nightmare.” 

While economically returning to the nest has its rewards, it’s not always a smooth transition. What’s the key to making it work?

Be sensitive.

Don’t focus on past conflicts … Generational differences around parenting should be acknowledged. Grandparents and parents may have markedly different viewpoints on child rearing  than their children do. “Honoring these differences should be an active part of the dialogue in the household, especially if there are small children being reared,” says Richard Shadick, PhD, director of the Counseling Center and adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University.

Boston Globe and many other media: New York maid speaking on alleged attack

Pace Law School professor Bennett L. Gershman is quoted in over 100 national and international news articles regarding the maid in the Strauss-Kahn case. He warns that she could be painted as a publicity seeker because “the interviews also could make the prospect of pursuing the case less attractive”.

Pace Law School professor Bennett L. Gershman is quoted in national and international news articles regarding the maid in the Strauss-Kahn case.

Gershman warns that she could be painted as a publicity seeker because “the interviews also could make the prospect of pursuing the case less attractive” (Boston Globe).

This news story has been picked up by over 100 media which include:

CBS News, Washington Times, ABC News, Seattle Times, Forbes.com, USA Today, Los Angeles Daily News, Metro Canada Online, New Zealand Herald, Maui News

Forbes: “The Five Stages Of Public Grieving”

In the wake of a national tragedy like the Tucson shooting last week, an entire country mourns.

“When there is a national tragedy, the emotions of dealing with it can often set off or remind people of personal tragedies, which can lead to depression,” says Richard Shadick, Ph.D., director of Pace University’s Counseling Center in New York City. “Public mourning of a national event can help people to deal with the personal feelings, but can also bring depressive emotions to the surface.”

Grieving through a national tragedy can be incredibly complex. Experts say the public deals with survivor’s guilt immediately following a trauma, and these feelings can be exacerbated by 24-7 news coverage. In the aftermath of the violent attack on Rep. Gabrielle Giffords in Tucson, Ariz., which left six people dead, including a 9-year-old girl, the country is mourning collectively as we try to pick up the pieces.

Here’s how to work your way through the Five Stages of Grief — Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression and Acceptance.

Forbes.com – Bruce Bachenheimer – “15 Tips For Raising A Young Mogul”

How can parents nurture a young business mogul who succeeds at his or her own business?

Insight from Pace’s entrepreneurial leader Bruce Bachenheimer appears in a Forbes.com article “15 Tips For Raising A Young Mogul” with accompanying pictorial slide show. See both online:

Forbes.com – Magazine Article.

AND

http://www.forbes.com/2010/09/20/how-to-raise-young-mogul-entrepreneurs-human-resources-serial-startups-10_slide_2.html

Pace University named to Forbes list of “Colleges That Will Make You Rich”

Pace University has been ranked by Forbes.com as one of the top 20 “colleges that will make you rich.” The Forbes survey echoes previous findings from a PayScale/Business Week survey that found the starting median salary of recent Pace graduates was in the same league as that for graduates of Yale, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, Stanford and Columbia. That survey found Pace graduates earning a starting median salary of $53,200, listed a mid-career median salary of $89,700 and found top incomes of $187,000 for Pace graduates. According to that article, “the Ivy League isn’t the only path to big bucks.”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Chris Cory, Pace, 917-608-8164, 212-346-1117, ccory@pace.edu

Pace University named to Forbes list of

“Colleges That Will Make You Rich”

Ranking maps what campuses add to salary expectations

NEW YORK, NY, September 1, 2010 – Pace University has been ranked by Forbes.com as one of the top 20 “colleges that will make you rich.”

The Forbes survey attempts to measure only what colleges and universities actually add to students’ salary expectations.

According to Forbes, to come up with the ranking their staff looked at factors like the average SAT scores of incoming students and the percentage of a student body that receives financial aid. Based on those background factors they then calculated how much one would expect graduates at each school to earn in their careers–and compared their actual earnings to that.

The average annual salary of Pace alumni 10 to 19 years after graduation is $85,031, according to data Forbes used from Payscale.com.

Other institutions in the top 20 include Dartmouth College, Williams College, Stanford University, the University of Chicago, and the University of California at Berkeley.

The results appear in a Forbes.com web feature in conjunction with Forbes’ education coverage, which also includes “America’s Best Colleges,” available online at www.forbes.com/colleges and in the August 30 issue of Forbes magazine.

High starting salaries, tooThe Forbes survey echoes previous findings from a PayScale/Business Week survey that found the starting median salary of recent Pace graduates was in the same league as that for graduates of Yale, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, Stanford and Columbia. That survey found Pace graduates earning a starting median salary of $53,200, listed a mid-career median salary of $89,700 and found top incomes of $187,000 for Pace graduates. According to that article, “the Ivy League isn’t the only path to big bucks.”

Jody Queen-Hubert, Executive Director of Career Services, noted, “This shows the payoff from entering the job market with professional skills and being backed by the largest internship program in the metropolitan area. We’re proud to see this confirmation of what students get from Pace’s emphasis on strong academics and participation in hands-on learning.”

Professional education at Pace University

Since 1906, Pace University has offered professional education that combines liberal arts with practical experience and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York. It enrolls more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu