University of Hiroshima in Japan Seeks Relationship with Pace for Exchange of Educational Programs

The Prefectural University of Hiroshima, Japan, equivalent to a state university in the United States, will formally announce tomorrow that it is seeking an international relationship with Pace University that would involve an exchange of training and educational programs.

MEDIA ADVISORYContacts: Cara Halstead Cea, Pace University, cell 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu Lorraine Monaco, Michaelian Institute, 914-422-4305, lmonaco@pace.edu

Hiroshima and Pace Universities to seek relationship via White Plains visit Tuesday morning, March 3

White Plains Mayor Delfino, County Executive Spano also will meet Japanese delegation

WHITE PLAINS, NY, March 2 — The Prefectural University of Hiroshima, Japan, equivalent to a state university in the United States, will formally announce tomorrow that it is seeking an international relationship with Pace University that would involve an exchange of training and educational programs.

The Japanese institution will also be discussing the similarities and differences among public/private partnerships in Japan and the United States with officials from the City of White Plains and Westchester County.

At all meetings, officials will exchange gifts and be available for photographs.

• From 11:00AM to 12:00PM Tomio Yoshikawa, Assistant to the President of the University of Hiroshima, will meet with Michael A. Genito, Director of Pace University’s Edwin G. Michaelian Institute for Public Policy and Management. The Institute is at 1 Martine Avenue, third floor, in White Plains. Media admission by press pass.

The Pace discussion also will include Pace professor Farrokh Hormozi, Chair of the Department of Public Administration in Pace’s Master of Public Administration (MPA) program, and other Pace professors and officials. Mr. Yoshikawa will be accompanied by Mr. Ryuichi Kohama, the Director for the Japan Local Government Center in New York City of US/Japanese relationships involving metropolitan government in the Tokyo area.

Possible Hiroshima/Pace connections, Genito says, range from exchange visits of municipal and other government officials who are connected to Michaelian’s studies of current government issues, to reciprocal course work, intensive language instruction and distance learning arrangements.

• At 1:15PM Mr. Yoshikawa will meet with White Plains Mayor Joseph Delfino at City Hall. Over the past ten years the city has undergone extensive redevelopment in close partnership with private-sector companies; Mayor Delfino visited Japan a few years ago to make a presentation on the economic development of White Plains.

• At 2:30PM the delegation will proceed to the Michaelian County Office Building to meet with County Executive Andrew Spano. The meeting will take place in Conference Room B on the 9th floor. Also attending will be Mae Carpenter, Commissioner of Sr. Programs and Services, Camille Murphy, Director of the Office for Women, Grant Mitchell, Commissioner of Community Mental Health, Daisy Yau, Director of the Office for Asian-American Affairs, and Scott Fernqvist, Special Assistant to the CIO for Global Strategy & Economic Development.

“This is a very exciting opportunity for us and our colleagues in Japan,” Genito said, “and with today’s technology the exchange of ideas and learning provides us both with a university without walls or borders.”

The Michaelian Institute has considerable experience with Japan.

This week Michaelian is preparing five government officials from Japan for 10-day internships with municipal governments in Westchester. The placements are part of a program Michaelian has conducted every year since 1992 in partnership with the Japan Local Government Center. In addition to their internship, the group will spend six months in intensive language training at Pace’s English Language Institute and take courses in public administration and American government.

The interests of this year’s senior “interns” range from government work with neighborhood associations to the roles governments can play in discouraging obesity.

The programs are designed to enhance the officials’ knowledge of how local governments in the United States operate and how they address critical problems and issues, as well as to enhance intercultural knowledge and understanding.

The Michaelian Institute also provides research studies and special training for governments, not-for-profits, and businesses that do business with the government and not-for-profit sectors. Pace University has a Master of Public Administration (MPA) program for those interested in pursuing or enhancing a career in government, not-for-profit, or health care.