SpryLiving: “A New You for the New Year”

It’s January. Time to ring in the New Year. And you have, without a doubt, made a ton of resolutions that for once you vow to finally keep. Know that you have the power to thrive, succeed, and become the individual you desire in 2012—without ever having to totally give up Moon Pies. Pace’s Richard Shadick and John Cronin offer advice in Spry Living’s January issue, reaching 9.5 million readers, on how to make your New Year Better Than Before.

“Yes, we all want to lose weight, eat more vegetables, get fit, drink water instead of white wine, hold fewer grudges, manage our stress, sleep better and help the planet go greener,” writes Jane Wilkens Michael in the January issue of Spry Living

But alas for many of us, our best goals and intentions are forgotten faster than old acquaintenances.  Here are tips that Michael garnered from Pace faculty members John Cronin and Richard Shadick on how to make our resolutions live on after January 1:

Emotional Health

Be realistic—and specific. “Instead of telling yourself, I am going to lose weight and be healthy next year, it is better to say, I will lose five pounds by February 15 by walking for 20 minutes three days a week and no longer drinking soda,” says Dr. Richard Shadick, director of the Counseling Center and adjunct associate professor of psychology at Pace University. The more specific, measurable, and attainable a goal is, the more likely it can be reached.

Giving back

It’s easy being green. “This New Year, resolve to help the planet,” says John Cronin, senior fellow for Environmental Affairs at Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies. “There are two questions I am asked most often: ‘Can one person really make a difference?’ and ‘How?’ The answer to the first is easy: Yes! It is the story of human history — but those who never try to make a difference never do.” Cronin poses a creative challenge: “Look to your own life to find that something special you can make happen. For example, one mechanic adds a dollar to the bill of each of his car repair customers as a donation to the Riverkeeper organization. Over the past 20 years he has directed thousands of dollars to the group, and his customers are delighted. Help your child’s school find environmental experts to speak to classes. Here’s a simple one: Share a fascinating fact, and your friends will spread the information too —how much of the water on our planet is available for drinking? (Answer: Less than 1%). I promise they will be amazed, educated and eager to tell someone else. The point is that in addition to the how-to’s of proper individual behavior, which after 42 Earth Days should be common knowledge by now, there are creative acts you can perform, invent and organize that will change the world right in your own backyard if you are bold enough to try.  Jump right in. The planet is waiting.”

Hunter Lovins, renowned champion of sustainable development, to speak at Pace on Oct. 13 and 14

“Business case for climate protection” to be presented by Hunter Lovins, renowned champion of sustainable development, at Pace University campuses in White Plains, Pleasantville Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 13 and 14 -part of four-day resident fellowship at Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies

Contact: Chris Cory, 212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

Note: Print quality version of photos of Lovins can be downloaded from: http://www.natcapsolutions.org/media.htm#images. She will be available for photos and interviews.

“Business case for climate protection” to be presented by Hunter Lovins, renowned champion of sustainable development, at Pace University campuses in White Plains, Pleasantville Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 13 and 14

Part of four-day resident fellowship at Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies

WHITE PLAINS, NY, October 9, 2009 — “It is no accident that the companies in the Dow Jones Sustainability Index outperform the general market.”

So says Hunter Lovins, the globally-known environmentalist who has been dubbed a millennium “hero of the planet” by Time Magazine for her charismatic advocacy of practical steps that businesses and governments can use to solve environmental problems. Lovins will be a Council of Independent Colleges/Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow in residence at Pace University’s Academy for Applied Environmental Studies from Monday to Thursday of next week. As part of her fellowship she will deliver two free public presentations:

• Tuesday, October 13, 5-6 pm: “Drivers of Change: The Business Case for Climate Protection and the Role of Law,” Pace Law School, Tudor Room, 78 North Broadway, White Plains

• Wednesday, October 14, 12:20-1:15 pm, “The Business Case for Sustainability and Climate Protection,” Pace Pleasantville Campus, Butcher Suite, Kessel Student Center, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville.

In 2002 Lovins founded Natural Capitalism Inc. and Natural Capitalism Solutions, a nonprofit in Eldorado Springs, Colorado, of which she is president. The organization educates “senior decision-makers” in business, government and civil society about the principles of sustainability, and develops concrete implementation strategies for companies, communities and countries.

Royal Dutch/Shell consultant

Lovins, who is trained as a lawyer, also was co-founder of the Rocky Mountain Institute, an influential environmental research and consulting center. She is co-author of nine books, including a “Climate Protection Manual for Cities” (2006), has appeared on media ranging from “60 Minutes” to Pat Robertson’s “700 Club,” and has consulted to companies and organizations including the Government of Afghanistan, the US. Environmental Protection Agency, Bank of America and Royal Dutch/Shell Group.

During her fellowship at the Pace Academy, Lovins also will visit classes and exchange ideas with Pace students and faculty members from many parts of the university, including law, arts and sciences, business, and the Honors Program at the Lubin School of Business. Seminars and discussions will include such topics as legal education, business strategy, green entrepreneurship, and economic development in Afghanistan.

Shareholder value of green

Lovins argues that environmentally sustainable practices enhance shareholder value through reduced costs and risks, and increased innovation, productivity, and market share. “Green” companies, she bluntly states, can “make more money.”

Nationally and internationally, Lovins says “unsustainable business practices contributed to the economic collapse,” but “saving energy strengthens the entire economy.”

Michelle Land, the Director of the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, noted: “Through collaboration and good business sense, Hunter Lovins has advanced the understanding of the need for green practices and products — and she has developed practical ways businesses can achieve them. Through her interdisciplinary approach and community-level involvement, she exemplifies the kind of applied study that is at the heart of Pace Academy’s mission.”

Widely known for its diverse environmental teaching and research, for 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

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Professors from 31 Colleges and Universities to Use River as Classroom

A literal boatload of environmentally-minded professors, including faculty members from more than half of the 44 member colleges and universities of the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities, will spend three weeks roughing it and learning from each other this summer on the Hudson River and in an Adirondack field camp. Through River Summer 2006, faculty members as well as middle and high school teachers will learn about the development of the Hudson and its watershed, while preparing curriculum units for their courses.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts:
Cara Halstead Cea or Bobbi Woller, Public Information, Pace University, 914-773-3312, bwoller@pace.edu or chalstead@pace.edu
Michelle Land, Program Coordinator, Pace Academy for the Environment
914-773-3738, mland@pace.edu

Note: Media will have access to the R/V Seawolf at various points on the Hudson River between July 6 and July 29. Media are also invited to meet faculty as they teach on land along the way. A schedule is available. A list of member institutions is at the end of this release and contact information for representatives is available upon request.

BY BOAT AND ON FOOT, PROFESSORS FROM 31 COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES TO USE HUDSON RIVER AS CLASSROOM AND LAB

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, June 29, 2006 — A literal boatload of environmentally-minded professors, including faculty members from more than half of the 44 member colleges and universities of the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities, will spend three weeks roughing it and learning from each other this summer on the Hudson River and in an Adirondack field camp. Through River Summer 2006, faculty members as well as middle and high school teachers will learn about the development of the Hudson and its watershed, while preparing curriculum units for their courses.

This year’s program will run from Thursday, July 6 through Saturday, July 29. On the 6th, the participants will arrive at 5:00pm at the 79th Street Boat Basin in Manhattan to board the R/V Seawolf, a research vessel operated by the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

The program. River Summer was pilot tested last year. In this year’s expanded program, participants will undertake a multitude of studies, focusing on the interconnectedness of many disciplines. Projects include water sampling, sediment coring, archaeology, biodiversity, wastewater, policies and laws surrounding the river, geology, history, and culture. New elements of the program include:
• At the end of River Summer 2006, for the first time faculty members will have multiple, ready-made curriculum components that can be integrated into regular coursework.
• Program coordinators are now collaborating with middle and high school educators who will be on the boat, including a seventh grade teacher from a “sister watershed” (the Delaware Watershed in PA). Other participating schools include Pearl River High School, Pearl River, NY, Radnor Middle School, Wayne, PA, and the Calhoun School in Manhattan.
• Representatives from the Liberty Science Center in Jersey City, NJ, who are developing new educational programs with a focus on rivers and estuaries, will be participating.
• New working relationships have been established with urban planning groups such as those of Newburgh and Beacon, NY. The City Planner for Newburgh and a representative working on the Sustainable Master Plan for Beacon will meet with the group.
• Undergraduate students will be involved in two components, geology and archaeology, with students teaching the latter. The geology students are from SUNY Ulster County Community College and archaeology/forensic chemistry student participants are from various community colleges – some from out of state. More information about this component of the program can be found at:http://hhmivc.vassar.edu/HHMI/out_er_info.htm#er%20program%20description
• Activities will be archived this year through filming and pod-casts to make them available to a wider community, including for use in classrooms.
• Educators near rivers nationwide have now expressed an interest in learning more about the River Summer program including those in Alabama, Texas, Arizona, California, Maine, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Minnesota, and the Delaware/Maryland/D.C. area (sister watersheds).

Multi-campus coalition, growing financial support. Formed over the last two years under the leadership of the Pace Academy for the Environment (PAE), the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities (ECHVCU) consists of 44 institutions throughout the Hudson watershed that have gathered for teaching, research and educational projects they could not do separately. Its members are pledged to a new era of cooperation through contribution of the skills and talents of faculty from diverse disciplines and institutions across the region.

Pace University is secretariat for the Environmental Consortium with its office situated in the PAE. John Cronin, who was the nation’s first Riverkeeper on the Hudson and is a Scholar in Residence at Pace University, directs PAE. Michelle Land, Program Coordinator of PAE, was appointed director of the Environmental Consortium in 2004. The PAE works closely with Stephanie Pfirman, Barnard College, who envisioned River Summer, as well as Tim Kenna and Margie Turrin, Columbia’s Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, who direct and coordinate River Summer.

This year, the Mellon Foundation has pledged its support for River Summer with a $200,000 two-year grant, and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation awarded the Consortium $30,000. Additional support for the program is provided by The Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries.

The mission of River Summer 2006 is to explore innovative methods of teaching and learning, using hands-on approaches from the perspective of multiple disciplines. “Through participation in this program, we will create an inter-institutional and interdisciplinary cadre of faculty with knowledge of the Hudson and each other,” said Pfirman.

The faculty members will progress through modules covering the New York Harbor, Lower, Mid, and Upper Hudson and the Adirondacks. Other program topics include studying Riverscope instrumentation for near-real time data collection, the new political economy of the Hudson River valley, GPS and orienteering exercises, acoustic surveying in New York Harbor, and writing about the Hudson.

Unique role of higher education. “Institutions of higher education are uniquely suited to help solve environmental issues and have an obligation to do so,” said Cronin. “Universities occupy a distinct place in society, advancing the understanding of the human and natural world through investigation and teaching across all disciplines, and encouraging discourse, debate and critical thinking to serve the public good. This program has the potential to take environmental education to a new level, not just in the Hudson watershed, but by developing curriculum ideas that can be used everywhere.”

Consortium Membership. (www.environmentalconsortium.org) The current members are Bard College, Barnard College, Colgate University, Columbia University, CUNY Queens College, Dominican College, Fordham University, Hamilton College, Iona College, Manhattan College, Manhattanville College, Marist College, Marymount College of Fordham University, Marymount Manhattan College, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, Mercy College, Mount Saint Mary College, College of Mount Saint Vincent, The College of New Rochelle, Pace University, Polytechnic University, Ramapo College of New Jersey, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, The Sage Colleges, The College of Saint Rose, Saint Thomas Aquinas College, Sarah Lawrence College, Siena College, Skidmore College, SUNY University at Albany, SUNY Columbia-Greene Community College, SUNY Dutchess Community College, SUNY Maritime College, SUNY New Paltz, SUNY, North Country Community College, SUNY Orange County Community College, SUNY Purchase College, SUNY Rockland Community College, SUNY Schenectady County Community College, SUNY Stony Brook, SUNY Ulster County Community College, SUNY Westchester Community College, Union College, Vassar College.

Founded in 1906, Pace University educates achievers who are engaged with critical issues both locally and globally. Known for its outcome-oriented environment that prepares students to succeed in a wide-range of professions, Pace has three campuses, including New York City (downtown and lower Manhattan), Westchester (Pleasantville, Briarcliff, and the White Plains Graduate Center), and the Pace School of Law in White Plains. A private metropolitan university, Pace enrolls more than 14,000 students in undergraduate, masters, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Ivan G. Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, and School of Education. Visit Pace University at www.pace.edu.

Leading Environmental Consortium in Hudson Valley Appoints First Director

The Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities today appointed its first director, Michelle Land, J.D., coordinator of the Pace Academy for the Environment (PAE).

Contact:
Rosemary Mercedes, Manager of Public Information
Pace University, 212-346-1637, Cell: 914-424-1637 rmercedes@pace.edu

The Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities today appointed its first director, Michelle Land, J.D., coordinator of the Pace Academy for the Environment (PAE).

Land will lead 34 higher education institutions in an ambitious interdisciplinary program aimed at training future environmental leaders and “shaping the future of the regional and global environment,” according to the Consortium’s adopted mission. This marks the first time the region’s colleges and universities have joined together on environmental issues.

“Only higher education can offer, in one place, the array of skills that environmental decision-making requires,” said Land. “The expertise the Consortium offers is comprehensive, from the social and natural sciences to art and economics, and everything in between. Harnessing those resources for students and the public good is a natural mission for colleges and universities.”

“Michelle Land’s deep knowledge of environmental issues and her leadership skills make her a natural for moving forward the coalition’s groundbreaking environmental and education efforts,” said John Cronin, director of the PAE and the nation’s first Riverkeeper.

Land earned a Juris Doctor and certificate in environmental law from Pace University School of Law in 2002, where she was Editor-in-Chief of the Pace Environmental Law Review. In 2000, while still a student, she was part of the team from Pace Law School’s Environmental Law Clinic that successfully argued the landmark Esopus Creek case before the U.S. Court of Appeals, Second Circuit (Catskill Mountains Chapter of Trout Unlimited et. al. vs. NYC DEP), which resulted in a $5.7 million penalty against the City of New York for discharging highly turbid water from the Shandanken tunnel without the required Clear Water Act permit. (The precedent setting case is on appeal for the penalty amount.)

For the last two years, Land has been program coordinator for PAE, one of the environmental programs that have made Pace University well known for environmental studies. (Its law school is one of the nation’s top three environmental law schools, as ranked by US News & World Report.) The PAE is dedicated to fostering policies, practices and ideas that sustain a mutually enhancing relationship between nature and society.

Land also is an adjunct assistant professor at Pace. She teaches environmental law, policy and the integration of nature and culture in both the M.S. in Environmental Science and undergraduate environmental studies programs.

As a wildlife biologist at the World Bird Sanctuary in Missouri, Land directed field research producing wildlife survey reports for corporate contracts. The focus of her work also included environmental education programs and rehabilitation, propagation and reintroduction of birds of prey.

She earned a Bachelor of Science degree, with honors, in Wildlife Biology from the University of Guelph, Ontario. Land also was a research associate at Pace’s Land Use Law Center, where she created a model local law for protecting wildlife and wildlife habitat. It was published as a chapter of a resource guide for local municipal officials.

Formed under the leadership of PAE, the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities promotes collaboration by its member campuses to increase the scope and impact of their environmental teaching and research. http://www.environmentalconsortium.org/

The Consortium’s current members are Bard College; Barnard College; Columbia University; CUNY – Queens College; Dominican College; Dutchess Community College; Fordham University; Iona College; Manhattan College; Manhattanville College; Marist College; Marymount College of Fordham University; Mount Saint Mary College; the College of Mount Saint Vincent; The College of New Rochelle; Pace University; Polytechnic University; Ramapo College of New Jersey; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; The Sage Colleges; The College of Saint Rose; Saint Thomas Aquinas College; Sarah Lawrence College; Sienna College; the State University of New York campuses at New Paltz, Purchase, Stony Brook and Albany; the SUNY community colleges of Westchester, Columbia-Greene, Rockland, and Ulster County; Union College and Vassar College.

A private university in the New York Metropolitan area, Pace has a growing national reputation for offering students opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. Approximately 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu

New Coalition to Announce Coordinated Agenda for Environmental Education and Public Service

College students will soon have the opportunity to take “classes” by kayak when an innovative “River Summer Semester” launches on the Hudson River.

Contact
Christopher T. Cory, Director of Public Information, Pace University
212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu
Michele Land, Pace Academy for the Environment
914-773-3738 or mland@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY
Editors: Sessions are closed to the public, open to reporters/producers.

Consortium leaders will issue a statement at 2:00 PM Saturday, October 30.
The statement can be emailed in midafternoon that day to interested desks and reporters. Please let us know if you want it.
It also will be posted on the coalition’s website, www.EnvironmentalConsortium.org.

Trading classrooms for kayaks?
NEW COALITION OF 33 HUDSON VALLEY COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES
TO ANNOUNCE COORDINATED AGENDA
FOR ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC SERVICE

Collaborative event will be “most important environmental/academic conference
ever held in the region” and set national model

Pleasantville, NY, October 26, 2004 – College students will soon have the opportunity to take “classes” by kayak when an innovative “River Summer Semester” launches on the Hudson River.

A group of colleges and universities that are collaborating to incubate the project will refine the curriculum in a conference Friday and Saturday, October 29-30, in Poughkeepsie at Marist College.

The group is the new Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities. Formed in February, it now includes 33 of the valley’s 60 colleges and universities. Their representatives will be planning new ways to improve the environment through cooperative teaching, research and service.

Consortium members include institutions close to the Hudson’s headwaters like Rensselaer Polytechnic in Troy, those near where the river mixes with sea water like Columbia, eight units of the State University of New York, small private colleges like Vassar and religious schools like Fordham.

Undergraduate research. The meeting will be the “most important environmental/academic conference ever held in the region,” said John Cronin, who directs Pace University’s Academy for the Environment and was the nation’s first Riverkeeper. In the last two years the Pace Academy has lead the creation of the new coalition and continues to play the key organizational role, under the direction of Michelle Land, a graduate of Pace Law School.

Presentations and “posters” by participants will provide an overview of undergraduate environmental programs already in place throughout the Valley. National and statewide perspective will come from experts at Oklahoma State University, Williams College, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Field stations and mentors. The “River Summer Semester” being crafted will be an interdisciplinary, intercampus combination of field work, class work, and work in communities. As students make their way down the Hudson from its headwaters in the Adirondacks to Manhattan, they will travel by foot, train and kayak, changing locations each week.

Other planned multi-campus courses and research projects will use the Hudson Valley as “an extended laboratory and classroom,” Cronin says. By joining resources, schools can accomplish more than any single institution. For example, the Consortium envisions a shared research vessel and field stations. Students will learn by sharing professors from other institutions than their own .

Pataki connection. Already Pace, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Columbia and the New York State Rivers and Estuaries Center on the Hudson are partners on “Riverscope,” a $1 million continuous, real-time monitoring system for the Hudson. A coalition website, www.environmentalconsortium.org , is helping professors and administrators exchange ideas.

Speakers at the consortium’s founding conference in February included Governor George E. Pataki, who announced the formation of an independent but related Higher Education Advisory Council on the Hudson headed by Pace President David A. Caputo. The group pledged cooperation with the new Rivers and Estuaries Center, for which Cronin wears a second hat as Managing Director.

Campuses are the ideal candidates. “Higher education must become more engaged in the environment,” Cronin insists.

“Colleges and universities are the only institutions with the dual purposes of being multi-disciplinary and serving society. They have the critical and intellectual capacity to marshal the knowledge and skills that environmental issues and environmental education require.”

The group hopes to set a model for other regions. “We believe the outcomes will have wide-ranging effects on environmental agendas for many college and universities,” Cronin says.

He adds: “The Hudson River Valley is an environmental bellwether. Environmental activities here predated Earth Day in 1970, and the Hudson has been the locus of pioneering case law and urban and rural environmental victories. Pace and other regional institutions are in the midst of an environmental culture of national and global significance.”

Membership. The current members of the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities are Bard College; Barnard College; Columbia University; CUNY – Queens College; Dominican College; Fordham University; Iona College; Manhattan College; Manhattanville College; Marist College; Marymount College of Fordham University; Mount Saint Mary College; the College of Mount Saint Vincent; The College of New Rochelle; Pace University; Polytechnic University; Ramapo College of New Jersey; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; The Sage Colleges; The College of Saint Rose; Saint Thomas Aquinas College; Sarah Lawrence College; Sienna College; the State University of New York campuses at New Paltz, Purchase, Stony Brook and Albany; the SUNY community colleges of Westchester, Columbia-Greene, Rockland, and Ulster County; Union College and Vassar College.

The Pace Academy’s mission deepens a commitment to environmental studies that the university has made since the 1980s. The School of Law’s environmental law program, for instance, including the Environmental Litigation Clinic, founded by Cronin and now co-directed by Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is ranked third-best in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.

As a private metropolitan university, Pace has a growing national reputation for offering students opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. It is one of the ten founders of Project Pericles, developing education that encourages lifelong participation in democratic processes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. Approximately 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu.

Urban Ecology: Cities in Transition

In response to a growing number of environmental issues facing urban zones, including ever-increasing sprawl, a geographic disease affecting most local communities throughout the United States, the Pace University Institute for Environmental and Regional Studies (PIERS) will host an all-day conference, “Urban Ecology: Cities in Transition.”

Contacts: Mary E. Horgan, 914-923-2798, mhorgan@pace.edu
Angela Nally, 212-346-1505,agnally@pace.edu

Urban Ecology: Cities in Transition

Pace Institute for Environmental and Regional Studies (PIERS)
to Host Conference, Apr. 11

New York, NY – April 7, 2003 – In response to a growing number of environmental issues facing urban zones, including ever-increasing sprawl, a geographic disease affecting most local communities throughout the United States, the Pace University Institute for Environmental and Regional Studies (PIERS) will host an all-day conference, “Urban Ecology: Cities in Transition.”

Presentations by environmental scholars interested in practical solutions will include models for sustainable cities, urban habitat restoration, issues in urban environmental justice, “footprints,” “shoes” and open space.

Where: Pace University
Downtown Campus (across from City Hall)
One Pace Plaza
Lecture Hall (W614)

When: Friday, April 11, 9:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Schedule on following page.

Journalists are welcome; advance registration appreciated. The conference is open to the public at an admissions fee of $55. For reservations and more information, contact Dr. Robert Chapman, Director, PIERS, at (212) 346-1364, or email rchapman@pace.edu.

Copies of the just-published book containing proceedings from the PIERS 2002, covering topics including ecofeminism, environmental restoration and storyscape and sense of place in Westchester County, are available by contacting Dr. Robert Chapman at rchapman@pace.edu.

The conference is one dimension of Pace University’s aggressive involvement in teaching, research and advocacy on environmental issues, which includes Pace Law School’s highly ranked environmental law program and environmental law clinic; the new Pace Academy for the Environment, which is administering a major project to monitor the health of the Hudson River and is organizing a consortium of Hudson Valley colleges and universities to cross-fertilize environmental teaching and research in the valley; and the Pace Center for Downtown New York (CDNY), which among other activities has sponsored a major conference on the environmental consequences of 9/11.

PIERS is part of the Dyson College of Arts & Sciences which introduced one of the first undergraduate interdisciplinary majors in Environmental Studies in 1996. Faculty and students participating in the program have conducted research in local biodiversity and species preservation, technology transfer, pollution policy, watershed health and local population dynamics. The College also offers a Masters in Environmental Science.

The PIERS mission is to provide leadership in the study of the complex interrelationships between human culture and nature with special emphasis on the Hudson River bioregion and its diverse ecological, social and cultural values. PIERS engages in interdisciplinary, university-wide research dedicated to the production and dissemination of knowledge and solutions to pressing environmental problems, through roundtable discussions, seminar series on regional issues, a visiting scholar program and regional conferences.

Conference Agenda highlights:

9:30-10:00 a.m. Registration, Lecture Hall (W614)

10:00-10:30 a.m. Keynote Speaker, Setha Low, Ph.D. CUNY Graduate Center
Lecture Hall (W614)

10:30-12:00 p.m. SESSION 1 “Social Issues in Sustainability”

10:00-11:30 a.m. SESSION 2 “Urban Sustainability – Reducing the Human Footprint”

10:00-12:00 p.m. SESSION 3 “Open Space and Urban Lawns”

11:30-12:30 PM SESSION 4 “Issues in Environmental Justice”

12:30-1:30 p.m. LUNCH – Faculty Dining Room

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. SESSION 5 “Aesthetics and Place in Urban Environments”

SESSION 6 “Urban Habitat Restoration”

1:30 – 2:30 p.m. SESSION 7 “Environmental Education”

2:30 – 4:00 p.m. SESSION 8 “Central Urban Issues: Water, Transportation and Commodities(Shoes)”

4:30 – 6:30 p.m. RECEPTION – Faculty Dining Room

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart International Airport in New Windsor, New York. More than 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing, and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu

Pace Scholar to Appear on PBS Documentary

John Cronin, Pace Resident Scholar in Environmental Studies, former Hudson
Riverkeeper, co-author of The Riverkeepers, documentary filmmaker, advocate for the Hudson and former commercial fisherman to be featured in PBS documentary on the Hudson River.

Who: John Cronin, Pace Resident Scholar in Environmental Studies, former Hudson
Riverkeeper, co-author of The Riverkeepers, documentary filmmaker, advocate for the Hudson and former commercial fisherman to be featured in PBS documentary on the Hudson River.

What: AMERICA’S FIRST RIVER: BILL MOYERS ON THE HUDSON

When: April 23 and April 24 from 9:00 to 11:00 p.m. (ET) on PBS (check local listings)

To reach John Cronin for expert comment on the making of the documentary and to learn more about the Hudson River contact: Mary Horgan at (914) 923-2798, email: mhorgan@pace.edu.
or Donald Singletary at (212) 346-1637, email: dsingletary@pace.edu.

John Cronin Biographical Information

Since 2000 Cronin has been the Resident Scholar in Environmental Studies at Pace University. He founded the Pace Institute for Environmental and Regional Studies to focus the talents and expertise of the university community on the environmental challenges facing the Hudson River and neighboring residents. Cronin also serves on the founding staff of Governor George Pataki’s Rivers and Estuaries Center on the Hudson, a global institute for environmental research and education. In addition, he is the president of the Hudson Fisheries Trust, established to preserve the maritime history and lore of the Hudson River’s commercial fishing families.

John Cronin has earned a reputation as one of America’s preeminent environmentalists. The Knight-Ridder Newspapers praised him as a “hero in one of the great success stories of the modern environmental movement,” People magazine described him as “equal parts detective, scientist and public advocate,” and the Wall Street Journal has called him “a unique presence on America’s major waterways.”

Named a Hero for the Planet by TIME magazine in 1999 for his work as America’s, and the Hudson’s, first full-time Riverkeeper, he was responsible for bringing to justice more than one hundred polluters and environmental lawbreakers. He co-founded the Water Keeper Alliance, which now represents more than 90 “Keeper” programs on waterways in four countries.
Cronin is an author, an award-winning documentary filmmaker and former commercial fishermen. He has been the subject of two books and numerous documentaries and profiles, co-authored the book The Riverkeepers, with Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., and has been a frequent contributor on environmental policy to The New York Times. Along with “Gorillas in the Mist” producer Robert Nixon he produced and wrote “The Last Rivermen” which the Motion Picture Academy Foundation named one of the outstanding documentary films of 1991.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.