Rye Brook coyote may have ingested rabid animal | LoHud.com | The Journal News

Pace professor and director of the environmental science graduate program, Melissa Grigione, Ph.D., was called upon for her expertise on wildlife and quoted throughout a recent Journal News article about coyotes.

Pace professor and director of the environmental science graduate program, Melissa Grigione, Ph.D., was called upon for her expertise on wildlife and quoted throughout a recent Journal News article about coyotes. Read the article on the Journal News web site by clicking on the link below:

Rye Brook coyote may have ingested rabid animal | LoHud.com | The Journal News.

Westchester Communities Need to Continue Programs and Take New Action to Reduce Greenhouse Gases 20%

Westchester County and its municipalities are making progress toward meeting the climate change and sustainability goals set forth in the county’s Action Plan for Climate Change and Sustainable Development, according to a new report.

Pace Contact: Crista Scaturro, (914) 422-4389, cscaturro@law.pace.edu

NYLCVEF Contact: Dan Hendrick (212) 361-6350 ext. 206, dhendrick@nylcv.org

NEWS RELEASE

Report Tracks Progress Of Westchester County and its Municipalities in Meeting Climate Change and Sustainability Goals

Yearlong Study is Culmination of Partnership between Pace Law School CELS and New York League of Conservation Voters Education Fund

WHITE PLAINS, NY – Westchester County and its municipalities are making progress toward meeting the climate change and sustainability goals set forth in the county’s Action Plan for Climate Change and Sustainable Development, according to a new report.

The report – titled “Climate Adaptation and Mitigation: Westchester Responds to the Changing Future” – is the culmination of a yearlong partnership between the Pace Law School Center for Environmental Legal Studies and the New York League of Conservation Voters Education Fund.

The report tracks the progress that Westchester County and its municipalities reported in seven broad sustainability areas of the Westchester Action Plan: greenhouse gas emissions; energy; transportation; land use; funding resources; water resources/stormwater runoff; and solid waste reduction and recycling.

Two-thirds (33 out of 45) of the municipalities responded to the voluntary survey, which was conducted by Pace Law CELS students and NYLCVEF staff. Because adoption of the Action Plan’s recommendations was voluntary, the report aims to show residents and policymakers what their communities are doing and present an opportunity to learn from their neighbors.

“The publication of this report comes at a critical time. From the banks of the Hudson River to the shores of Long Island Sound, it is clear that the risks of not responding to climate change are great for communities in Westchester County,” said Alexandra Dapolito Dunn, Assistant Dean of Environmental Law Programs at Pace University School of Law and its Center for Environmental Legal Studies. “As this report shows, many of Westchester’s local governments are aware of climate change challenges and leading the way toward a more sustainable future.”

Marcia Bystryn, President of the New York League of Conservation Voters Education Fund, said: “The Westchester Action Plan set the bar for sustainability progress in the county. As more residents, municipalities and businesses become aware of what they can do to combat climate change, and realize the economic benefits of greater sustainability, the success of the Action Plan will continue.”

In spring 2008, the Westchester Action Plan for Climate Change and Sustainable Development set a goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions within the county 20 percent by 2015 (from 2005 levels) and 80 percent by 2050. The Action Plan lays out direct and capacity-building actions to achieve this goal by implementing short-, mid- and long-term strategies that engage county and municipal governments, the business sector, educational institutions and individual households.

The Pace Law/NYLCVEF survey shows that progress varies greatly among the goal areas. For example:

• 30 percent of participating municipalities have completed an inventory of their greenhouse gas emissions;

• 52 percent have audited their energy use to identify ways to conserve;

• Three out of four survey participants have programs designed to replace municipal vehicles with more energy-efficient models;

• 83 percent have integrated sustainability into their comprehensive plans;

• Slightly less than half (42 percent) have policies that encourage the use of environmentally sensitive products;

• 100 percent reported they follow best practices to manage stormwater and runoff in order to protect water resources; and

• Slightly more than half (52 percent) have developed plans for waste reduction, recycling and reuse.

The full report can be viewed online at www.nylcvef.org and www.law.pace.edu.

The report concludes that Westchester’s communities will need to continue current programs and take new actions to meet the Action Plan’s short-term goal of a 20 percent reduction in greenhouse gases by 2015.

“Despite the sluggish economy, opportunities do exist to make progress,” said Dean Dunn. “Many of the examples in our report demonstrate that changes to zoning, enforcement or purchasing both reduce greenhouse gas emissions and save taxpayer dollars.”

NYLCVEF President Bystryn added: “This year ushered in new leadership for Westchester County and a number of municipalities. It is up to our new leaders to reaffirm climate reduction goals, preserve past actions and implement new steps that achieve even greater results. The longer government waits to meet the challenges of climate change, the more difficult and expensive it will be to do so down the road.”

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has over 7,000 alumni throughout the country and the world and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top three programs in environmental law. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus and offers the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law, Real Estate Law and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in environmental law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu

The New York League of Conservation Voters Education Fund (NYLCVEF) engages and educates New Yorkers on environmental issues and the environmental decision-making processes at the local, regional, state and federal government levels. NYLCVEF fosters open, non-partisan discussion on environmental policy and empowers New Yorkers to be effective advocates for the environment. www.nylcvef.org

Jammin’ for a Smart Planet

Eight of 10 students want universities to revamp traditional learning environments while over 90 percent want to join or start a Green Advocacy group at their campus. 64 percent of students believe that the world has a chance to reverse carbon emissions by 2025, and 60 percent believe that education and efficient transportation offer the best hope for sustainability of our cities.

PACE STUDENTS HELP THINK UP A ‘SMART PLANET’ IN ONLINE JAM WITH IBM AND THE WORLD

The release below describes the collaborative participation of Pace University classes in Computer Science and Environmental Science during a three-day, on-line, global jam session (AKA ‘crowd sourcing’) that produced interesting findings about worldwide student attitudes. Taylor Vogt, a Pace political science major, was one of 20 students among the nearly 2000 participants to earn a merit award for “insightful and innovative contributions to the Jam discussion on how technology and business can help build a smarter planet in areas such as energy, traffic, water, education and healthcare.”

The release was sent today by IBM.

Media contact: Tim Willeford IBM 914-766-3389 twilleford@us.ibm.com

Students See into the Future during IBM Jam; Faculty and Students from 40 Countries Collaborate with IBM to Build a Smarter Planet

IBM to Launch Facebook Student Mentoring Program, Unveils New Faculty Awards for Leading Jam Contributors

ARMONK, N.Y. – July 29, 2009: Eight of 10 students want universities to revamp traditional learning environments while over 90 percent want to join or start a Green Advocacy group at their campus. 64 percent of students believe that the world has a chance to reverse carbon emissions by 2025, and 60 percent believe that education and efficient transportation offer the best hope for sustainability of our cities.

These are just a few of the findings of a remarkable crowdsourcing process held by IBM (NYSE: IBM) called the Smarter Planet University Jam.

Nearly 2,000 students from more than 200 universities from 40 countries around the world took part in the Jam, showing that students around the world are eagerly seeking opportunities to work together with industry to create a Smarter Planet, and they are extremely optimistic about the future.

“The Smarter Planet University Jam was the first time that so many university-aged students came together in an online forum to brainstorm ideas to better our world,” said Jai Menon, vice president of technical strategy and university programs, IBM.

“Students are confident that their future will be a smarter place – a world where they will drive cars that get 100 miles per gallon, learn in virtual classrooms connected with students across the globe, and where they can run their businesses on a secure, energy-efficient and interconnected grid. They are boldly challenging the industry to transform that vision into their reality, and IBM is committed to meeting that challenge.”

In view of the Jam’s findings, following IBM’s announcement in June of a remote mentoring program for university students by IBM employees in India, IBM plans to expand remote mentoring worldwide after refinement of the pilot program in India.

IBM also announced plans to launch an online employee/student mentoring program on Facebook.

Jam Results

“Jammers” contributed hundreds of progressive insights during the massive crowdsourcing session, brainstorming on topics including the skills students need to be competitive in the globally integrated economy; environmental protection, water management and conservation; fostering pollution-free and inexpensive energy; and providing advanced healthcare as the world’s population continues to grow rapidly, especially in developing nations.

IBM’s report highlights the results of the Jam, which pointed to the positive outlook that students have about how they can affect the future as well as confirmed their incredible thoughts on education, going green, and other ideas to build a smarter planet.

Skills for a Globally Integrated Economy

Jammers foresaw the need to create a new model of university education around smarter campuses, which are interconnected, enriched and fed by on-the-ground knowledge being developed over social networks. Universities would incorporate broader use of virtual environments and videoconferencing to enhance learning, interaction, networking and communication.

In a poll conducted during the Jam, 82 percent of those polled believed that “virtual worlds” are a great place to learn these future skills.

Jammers also discussed that success in the services-based global economy requires academia, government, and industry to work together to create “T-shaped” people with deep knowledge in one discipline and broader knowledge in other areas. To meet this need, IBM has pioneered an interdisciplinary curriculum called Service Science, Management and Engineering (SSME), and is currently working with 250 universities around the globe.

Jammers identified project-based teams – across geographical, disciplinary and institutional boundaries – as the preferred model for this interdisciplinary education, ensuring a mix of business, technical and liberal arts knowledge for the development of richer, more innovative solutions.

Green and Beyond

The report also showed that this generation is definitely going green. Faculty and student jam participants contributed over 100 examples and ideas of how their universities are, or could be, “going green”, including:

• Using deterrents like expensive campus parking to encourage walking, extra charges for plastic bags in all campus shops, and setting weekly printing limits.

• Solar powered and LEED-certified campus buildings, and electric campus vehicles, to promote smart energy use.

Other Jam Highlights

Other highlights from the Smarter Planet University Jam emerged from the following areas:

• Smart Water Management: Jammers discussed the need to change the cost structure of water usage and to make policy changes to address the current lack of incentives to save water.

• Smarter Healthcare: Great discussions focused in on personalized health via mobile devices, which could be equipped with specialized diagnostic tools useful in chronic diseases management, specifically mentioned in the context of improving healthcare in developing countries.

• Smart Grid: Jammers saw the need for incentives for the private sector to innovate “in the open” and share via open source technology when appropriate, yet still be able to generate profits. Jam participants also voiced the need to create secure, attack resistant networks.

• Smart Cities: Jammers highlighted the potential use of Online Gaming, Augmented Reality, and 3D Worlds for involving citizens in planning the future of their cities. They agreed that virtual reality enables faster and cheaper assessment of ideas about Smart Cities than with real implementation.

Jammers contributed other insights around creating Smarter Transportation systems – including vehicles running from solar, electric, and other alternate energy sources including manual human leg power – and Smart Evacuation Systems.

Several universities held Jam sessions during class or hosted special events on campus.

Pace University combined Computer Science and Environmental Studies classes to jam together on its campus in Pleasantville, New York. “The Smarter Planet University Jam was one of the most exciting and innovative experiences I have ever been a part of. IBM is setting the standard for the corporate world to start learning from the people that depend on them,” said Taylor Vogt, a student majoring in political science at Pace University. “This kind of free-flowing forum is extremely vital to the sustainability movement, where far too often good ideas are never shared or worse, never listened to. I was proud to be a part of this experience.”

Both university faculty and administration were actively involved in the Jam. “The IBM Smarter Planet University Jam provided an excellent forum for our students and faculty to explore using technology to drive smart growth and innovation with people around the world,” said Dr. Yi Deng, director and professor, School of Computer Science, Florida International University. “I am happy to see IBM once again take the lead in combining business with social responsibility.”

Faculty Awards and Student Recognition

Two faculty members stood out as Jammers with unusual perception and ability to think forward. The top faculty contributor was Dr. Ismail Ari, assistant professor of electrical engineering at Ozyegin University in Instanbul, Turkey. Dr. Ari will receive an IBM Faculty Award to seed collaborative research with IBM in Smarter Planet topic areas of mutual interest. Some of his notable contributions included metrics for smart cities, the use of augmented reality to involve citizens in city planning, and development of smart evacuation systems.

A second IBM Faculty Award for research in Services Science, Management and Engineering (SSME) went to Ravi Nemana, executive director of SSME of the Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS) at the University of California, Berkeley. Professor Nemana contributed key ideas and insights, including discussion on smarter healthcare for emerging regions and ideas for mobile applications that integrate social networks to help individuals manage their healthcare.

IBM also recognized 20 students for their insightful and innovative contributions to the Jam. The full report, including the list of top student contributors from around the globe, and podcast interviews with Jai Menon and the Faculty Award winners, is available at www.ibm.com/university/smartplanet_jam.

In addition, a blog with a deeper view from Jai Menon is available at www.asmarterplanet.com. More information about IBM’s Smarter Planet Education and university efforts is available at www.ibm.com/press/smarterplaneteducation or www.ibm.com/press/university.

Plans for Queens School to be Built on Toxic Site to be Discussed Today at Pace

Pace University biology student Alessia Eramo, with her professor and mentor, James M. Cervino, Ph.D. and the chair of the Pace biology department, Richard Schlesinger, Ph.D., will be holding a town hall style meeting with the city’s School Construction Authority (SCA) and local government officials to discuss a proposed school in Queens to be built on a toxic site or “brownfield” and to present the results of studies they conducted at the site at the request of New York State Senator Frank Padavan. According to the Environmental Protection Agency’s website, brownfields are real estate “the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence … of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.”

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact:
Cara Halstead, Public Information Officer, Pace University
914-773-3312 Office, 914-906-9680 Cell, chalstead@pace.edu

PLANS TO BUILD A SCHOOL ON A TOXIC SITE IN QUEENS
TO BE DISCUSSED AT PACE UNIVERSITY

Analysis of the New York State Department of Conservation Clean-up proposal to be presented to city’s School Construction Authority by Pace researchers

NEW YORK, NY, April 11, 2007 – Pace University biology student Alessia Eramo, with her professor and mentor, James M. Cervino, Ph.D. and the chair of the Pace biology department, Richard Schlesinger, Ph.D., will be holding a town hall style meeting with the city’s School Construction Authority (SCA) and local government officials to discuss a proposed school in Queens to be built on a toxic site or “brownfield” and to present the results of studies they conducted at the site at the request of New York State Senator Frank Padavan. According to the Environmental Protection Agency’s website, brownfields are real estate “the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence … of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.”

To be called the Gateway School, the new structure is planned for a site on Goethals Ave. between 160th and 161st Streets in Jamaica, Queens.

WHAT: Presentation of toxicology research to the School Construction Authority and the public

WHEN: Thursday, April 12, 12:00pm

WHERE: Pace University, downtown New York City campus (near City Hall), 41 Park Row, Dyson Conference Room, 16th floor

WHO: Pace University researchers presenting to the city’s School Construction Authority, Queens government officials, and other concerned parties. This meeting is free and open to the public. Media admission is by press pass.

Cervino, a marine pathologist who is also a post doc researcher with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Cape Cod, MA, was asked by Senator Frank Padavan (R) NY to analyze the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) clean-up proposal of the site. Pace biology department chair, Richard Schlesinger, Ph.D., will also be on hand to answer questions regarding human health concerns pertaining to the site and the proposed sub slab depressurization system, designed to eliminate soil gas, to be installed after the toxins are removed.

BACKGROUND: Soil samples were collected in 2001 and 2002 and then again in 2005 and 2006 at the request of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). After a remedial action plan was developed by the SCA and input received from the NYSDEC, the plan was approved by the DEC. Recent soil vapor samples analyzed by the Pace researchers revealed hazardous chemical substances remain including fuel, medical waste and cleaning chemicals. Although there are provisions in the SCA plan for removing these hazardous substances, the Pace researchers have found additional issues that should be resolved to minimize the health risks associated with them.

Dyson College Offers New Graduate Program in Environmental Science

Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences will offer a new master’s degree program in environmental science beginning this fall. The program, to be taught by faculty in the departments of biological sciences, chemistry and physical sciences, is the only one of its kind in the New York Metropolitan area.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
PLEASANTVILLE, NY — Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences will offer a new master’s degree program in environmental science beginning this fall. The program, to be taught by faculty in the departments of biological sciences, chemistry and physical sciences, is the only one of its kind in the New York Metropolitan area.

Scientific and technological advances of the 19th and 20th centuries have led to substantial economic growth and progress world wide. These changes, however, also have impacted the environment in significant and unexpected ways. “Pace’s interdisciplinary graduate program will help students acquire the knowledge and practical skills needed to tackle the environmental challenges of the 21st century,” said Dr. David Rahni, professor of analytical chemistry and director of the new program.

Students will learn about the growing challenges facing today’s global community, including the depletion of natural resources, disruption in the food chain, global climate changes, the decline of air, water and land quality, and the increase in toxic pollutants. Also, they will learn methods of monitoring, correcting and preventing such environmental problems.

This 39-credit master’s degree program has been approved and registered by the New York State Department of Education. Classes and research will take place in the Dyson Hall of Science, which is a modern facility with environmental instruments, an aquatic ecology laboratory, computers and state-of-the-art technology.

Students may have opportunities to participate in cooperative educational internships for field work experience. Degree candidates will have a broad, in-depth knowledge and appreciation of the field of environmental science as well as practical research skills.

Employment opportunities for graduates may include environmental research, testing, analysis, field assessment, and waste management for nonprofit foundations, corporations, federal and state research centers and universities. There also will be opportunities for management positions in federal, state and local environmental protection agencies and departments and of environmental conservation.

Students interested in applying for admission to the program should have completed the equivalent of two years of basic, undergraduate science courses. However, qualified students can enroll in the program and complete undergraduate prerequisite courses along with the graduate-level courses.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.