The New York Times: A Chat With RealClimate Blogger Gavin Schmidt

Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding, Andrew Revkin, wrote a New York Times Dot Earth blog post that highlights what his environmental science graduate students are doing at Pace.

Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at Pace, Andrew Revkin, wrote a New York Times Dot Earth blog post that highlights what Pace environmental science graduate students are doing.

From the article:

“I’m in the second year of co-teaching a Pace University course helping environmental science graduate students develop the ability to communicate their work and avoid the pitfalls that come in a field that is often at the center of policy disputes. (You might have seen scientists at the center of a few such disputes of late.)

The students write letters to the editor and op-ed-style articles. They learn to use Twitter (the course hashtag is #PaceEnv) and blogs both for outreach and as learning and network-building tools. They become comfortable giving public presentations. And they hear from an array of guests, often via Skype, who recount what they’ve learned as public scientists.

Last year, after the CNN host Nancy Grace debated the meteorologist Bernie Rayno on air, insisting he was wrong in saying there was no chance that Japan’s nuclear crisis posed any radiation danger in the United States (he was right), Rayno “visited” us to describe the experience and the methods he uses to maintain composure and cogency in such situations.

In our latest session, we had a chat with Gavin Schmidt, who for 15 years has been a climate researcher at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies and, in 2004, spearheaded the launch of Realclimate.org. The blog has become a vital online touchstone for anyone eager to assess what’s known and yet to learn about greenhouse-driven climate change.”

For video and to read the full article, click here.

 

SpryLiving: “A New You for the New Year”

It’s January. Time to ring in the New Year. And you have, without a doubt, made a ton of resolutions that for once you vow to finally keep. Know that you have the power to thrive, succeed, and become the individual you desire in 2012—without ever having to totally give up Moon Pies. Pace’s Richard Shadick and John Cronin offer advice in Spry Living’s January issue, reaching 9.5 million readers, on how to make your New Year Better Than Before.

“Yes, we all want to lose weight, eat more vegetables, get fit, drink water instead of white wine, hold fewer grudges, manage our stress, sleep better and help the planet go greener,” writes Jane Wilkens Michael in the January issue of Spry Living

But alas for many of us, our best goals and intentions are forgotten faster than old acquaintenances.  Here are tips that Michael garnered from Pace faculty members John Cronin and Richard Shadick on how to make our resolutions live on after January 1:

Emotional Health

Be realistic—and specific. “Instead of telling yourself, I am going to lose weight and be healthy next year, it is better to say, I will lose five pounds by February 15 by walking for 20 minutes three days a week and no longer drinking soda,” says Dr. Richard Shadick, director of the Counseling Center and adjunct associate professor of psychology at Pace University. The more specific, measurable, and attainable a goal is, the more likely it can be reached.

Giving back

It’s easy being green. “This New Year, resolve to help the planet,” says John Cronin, senior fellow for Environmental Affairs at Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies. “There are two questions I am asked most often: ‘Can one person really make a difference?’ and ‘How?’ The answer to the first is easy: Yes! It is the story of human history — but those who never try to make a difference never do.” Cronin poses a creative challenge: “Look to your own life to find that something special you can make happen. For example, one mechanic adds a dollar to the bill of each of his car repair customers as a donation to the Riverkeeper organization. Over the past 20 years he has directed thousands of dollars to the group, and his customers are delighted. Help your child’s school find environmental experts to speak to classes. Here’s a simple one: Share a fascinating fact, and your friends will spread the information too —how much of the water on our planet is available for drinking? (Answer: Less than 1%). I promise they will be amazed, educated and eager to tell someone else. The point is that in addition to the how-to’s of proper individual behavior, which after 42 Earth Days should be common knowledge by now, there are creative acts you can perform, invent and organize that will change the world right in your own backyard if you are bold enough to try.  Jump right in. The planet is waiting.”

NEWS ADVISORY: Collaborative Regional Research on Environment and Economic Concerns to be Explored by Educators at Albany Meeting Nov. 11-12

With the uncertainty of New York State’s environmental, educational and economic future on the minds of law-makers in Albany and residents throughout the state, , educators from the Hudson River watershed region will meet this weekend to explore opportunities to work together on research.

Hudson River watershed region’s future to be explored at 8th annual meeting of the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, November 11, 2011 – With the uncertainty of New York State’s environmental, educational and economic future on the minds of law-makers in Albany and residents throughout the state, , educators from the Hudson River watershed region will meet this weekend to explore opportunities to work together on research.

The 8th annual meeting of the Environmental Consortium of Colleges & Universities takes place this weekend, November 11 – 12, at The College of Saint Rose in Albany, NY. The theme is “Collaboration Throughout the Hudson River Watershed.”  It will bring together faculty, administrators, students, government and community representatives, and non-profit leaders to identify research priorities for the region.

Saturday morning’s speaker is Congressman Paul Tonko. Through his “Mighty Rivers” initiative, he has become the voice of the upper Hudson and Mohawk, and an aggressive fighter in Washington for a sustainable future. He will speak about his vision for the role of the greater watershed in New York’s environmental, educational and economic future.

“Collaboration is a word we hear over and again,” said John Cronin, Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs at the Pace University’s Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, which played a leading role in starting the consortium. “But inter-school collaboration is increasingly our future in higher education, and, I believe, where our environmental future has its best chance. What a great opportunity this event provides to explore these ideas further.”

Other speakers at the conference include Anthony Collins, President of Clarkson University, who will deliver a keynote address on “Collaboration for Innovation: Harnessing the Power and Potential of Colleges and Universities.”  There will be special presentation by David Rothenberg, “The Music in Nature,” on Friday evening.  Through listening, learning, and playing along, Rothenberg will show how exploring the musicality of birds, whales, and insects is one more way to make the environment seem meaningful to students and teachers alike.

The “Collaboration” conference also features concurrent workshop sessions on a wide range of topics and concludes with a multidisciplinary poster session.

The conference is open to the public. The rate for individuals affiliated with the 57  member institutions in the Environmental Consortium is $25 for students ($35 for non-members), and $125 for members ($150 for non-members).  Single day rates are also available. The fee includes admission to the conference, meals, and the poster session. Accommodations are not included.

Full details and registration information are at www.environmentalconsortium.org. Online registration is open. Media admission is by press pass.

WHAT: Collaboration Throughout the Hudson River Watershed, the 8th Annual Meeting of the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities
WHEN: Friday, November 11 (4:30 – 8:30pm) through Saturday, November 12 (8:00am – 5:00pm)

WHERE: The College of Saint Rose, 432 Western Avenue, Albany, New York 12203, 1-800-637-8556,

http://www.strose.edu/

WHO: Presenters below.

Speaker Lineup 

Workshops

  • Establishing a New Regional Environmental Journal
  • Raising All Boats: Leveraging the Consortium to Maximize Institutional Gain
  • Collaboration Between Higher Education and Cornell Cooperative Extension
  • Field Programs and Stations: Where and How to Extend the Classroom
  • Understanding the Hudson with Technology
  • Pre-Service Teacher Training and PreK-12 Collaboration with Higher Education
  • Collaboration Between Higher Education and Non-Profits
  • Growing Capacity for the Regional Foodshed: Training, Research, & Policy
  • Inter-Institutional Collaboration in Education and Research
  • New and Innovative Educational Programs
  • Student and Student-Faculty Research Opportunities
  • Engaging the Community and Local Government

 

Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities

The Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities was established in 2004 to advance understanding of the cultural, social, political, economic, and natural factors affecting the Hudson River Watershed and currently has 57 member institutions. The Consortium’s mission is to harness higher education’s intellectual and physical resources to advance regional, ecosystem-based environmental research, teaching, and learning through interdisciplinary, collaborative programs and information sharing.

Spearheaded and hosted by Pace University, the Consortium is headquartered within the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies in Pleasantville, New York. Among the Academy’s goals is applying the University’s strengths to local and global environmental problems. As a testament to its commitment to interdisciplinary pedagogy, scholarship, and service, the Academy provides essential administrative support for the Consortium’s programs.

www.environmentalconsortium.org

The Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies

The Academy is the first of several centers for excellence envisioned by Pace University’s President, Stephen Friedman, to promote high-level collaborative and interdisciplinary programming in key thematic, academic areas throughout the University. The Academy is a freestanding institute that renews and deepens the University’s long-standing commitment to environmental research, scholarship, and service.

Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies is dedicated to enhancing a mutually beneficial relationship between nature and society by harnessing the unique knowledge, talents and skills intrinsic to university life.  www.pace.edu/academy

Media contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

Associated Press: Environmental activist Robert F. Kennedy Jr. speaks in NC, helps rivers group raise money

Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s Pace affiliation is mentioned in an Associated Press (AP) brief for his speaking engagements in North Carolina, picked up by close to 20 outlets including the Washington Examiner and the Winston-Salem Journal.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s Pace affiliation is mentioned in an Associated Press (AP) brief for his speaking engagements  in North Carolina, picked up by close to 20 outlets including  the Washington Examiner and the Winston-Salem Journal.

From the AP:

Winston-Salem, N.C. — Environmental lawyer and activist Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is in North Carolina to talk about the economic impact of energy and environmental issues.

Kennedy is speaking Thursday evening at Wake Forest University’s Wait Chapel and at the university’s law school Friday morning.

Kennedy has numerous environmentalist credentials, including as a professor and supervising attorney at Pace University’s Environmental litigation clinic. Kennedy also is president of the Waterkeeper Alliance, an organization that seeks to protect watersheds worldwide.

A group dedicated to preserving the Yadkin River is using Kennedy’s visit to hold a fundraising reception.

The Journal News: Thruway Authority seeks energy answers in the wind | LoHud.com

Todd Olinsky-Paul, Manager of Communications, Education and Outreach at the Pace Energy & Climate Center, told The Journal News that wind farms go where the reliable wind is, often along waterfronts and on high elevations. ”Unfortunately it’s not always where the load is, but you have to go where the resource is,” he said.

The Journal News reported that the New York State Thruway Authority plans to install five wind turbines, expected to generate 1.2 megawatts of electricity combined, to help power its Buffalo offices.

Todd Olinsky-Paul, Manager of Communications, Education and Outreach at the Pace Energy & Climate Center, told The Journal News that wind farms go where the reliable wind is, often along waterfronts and on high elevations.”Unfortunately it’s not always where the load is, but you have to go where the resource is,” he said.

Many of New York’s wind farms are in the western end of the state, he said. Other areas might have the wind, but might be poor sites for other reasons, including the potential for public opposition. As an example, Olinsky-Paul said ridge lines in the Adirondacks might offer the wind.”I imagine there would be a lot of resistance to that sort of a project in a park,” he said.

Thruway Authority seeks energy answers in the wind | The Journal News | LoHud.com | LoHud.com.

The New York Times: “Who Made This Mess of Planet Earth”

Andrew C. Revkin’s association with Pace was mentioned in the author’s note to his favorable review of “Here On Earth” in the July 17th New York Times Book Review.

Andrew C. Revkin, the senior fellow for environmental understanding at Pace University, favorably reviews “Here On Earth”  in his Dot Earth blog for the Opinion Pages of NYTimes.com while commenting on today’s environmental situation.

From the article:

An overwhelming majority of scientists agree that humans have upended hosts of ecosystems and are exerting a growing and potentially calamitous influence on the climate. Some, perhaps in response to public indifference, have a tendency to push beyond the data in arguing for action. “Here on Earth” places Flannery in this group. I had a moment, about halfway in, when I was ready to give up in the face of overheated descriptions of environmental problems. But I stuck it out and was heartened to see Flannery abandon the rhetoric of shame and woe and turn to a more reasoned assessment of a young, intelligent species that finds itself in quite a predicament. After all, it’s not easy being the first life-form to become both a planet-scale force and — ever so slowly and uncomfortably — aware of that fact. That awareness is in its early stages and, as Flannery notes, “infancy is the most dangerous period of life.”

Read the full article in The New York Times.

MidHudsonNews.com: “Cronin awarded Jefferson Gold Medal”

John Cronin has been a part of the Hudson River environmental movement since 1973 when he started with the Clearwater organization. He reflects how Clearwater founder Pete Seeger recruited him as a volunteer.

John Cronin is a senior fellow at Pace University and executive director of the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries.

He can also add another title to his resume, a recipient of the Jefferson Award, named for Thomas Jefferson and founded by former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis as a “Noble Prize for public service.”

Cronin was described by the Jefferson Awards Board of Selectors as “Hero for the Planet [and] equal parts detective, scientist and public advocate.” The board said his efforts “have inspired a legacy of programs across the globe, fighting pollution on six continents.”

The MidHudsonNews reports Pace University President Stephen Friedman nominated Cronin for the award, for which Cronin said he was both humbled and honored.

Poughkeepsie Journal: “Hudson River steward receives Jefferson Award”

Steward of the Hudson River and water quality, John Cronin, received a 2011 Jefferson Award for his decades of public service.

John Cronin, a resident of Cold Spring, is known for his 17 years at environmental group Riverkeeper, and is the director and CEO of Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries. He is also a Pace University senior fellow.

At the Beacon Institute, Cronin directs a program that monitors rivers and estuaries using a network of sensors and robotics.

He lectures on the environment, co-authored “The Riverkeepers” with Robert F. Kennedy Jr., and wrote and co-produced the film “The Last Rivermen.”

Cronin told the Poughkeepsie Journal that he credited folksinger Pete Seeger and Pace University as his sources of inspiration.

The Journal News: “Ex-Riverkeeper John Cronin receives Jefferson Award”

Former Riverkeeper John Cronin joined a select group this week that included U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and actress Marlo Thomas.

They all received what has been dubbed the “Nobel Prize” for public service — the Jefferson Award.

John Cronin, 60, has worked on environmental issues facing the Hudson River for nearly four decades and was one of 18 people honored with  The Jefferson Award in a ceremony in Washington, DC, Tuesday night.

“It was quite a surprise,” Cronin said Friday to The Journal News. “Some of the awards are known ahead of time, others are kept under wraps. I was just going there to represent Pace University. I still haven’t figured out who knew and who didn’t.”

“The big theme of the two days was that everyday people can change the world,” Cronin said. “It reminded me what a special place the Hudson River Valley is, that we started an environmental movement before there was an Earth Day, when environmentalism wasn’t very popular at all.”

Representing Pace, Cronin was given a Champion award, presented to two “exceptional individuals whose volunteer work reflects the deep and abiding commitment of their employers to making a different in the communities where their employees live and work.”

The award cited his work as an environmental advocate for nearly four decades, serving “on the front lines of water-quality issues as a legislative aide, riverkeeper, and as the co-founder of the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic, a nationally acclaimed training program for law students and educators.”

Cronin is director and CEO of Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries, and a Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs, Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies at Pace University.

NEWS RELEASE: Hudson River Advocate John Cronin Awarded Jefferson Gold Medal

HUDSON RIVER ADVOCATE JOHN CRONIN AWARDED JEFFERSON GOLD MEDAL

“Nobel Prize for Public Service” Created by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, June 24, 2011 — Renowned environmentalist and Pace University senior fellow John Cronin was presented with the prestigious Jefferson Award in a ceremony in Washington, DC, Tuesday night. Cronin was honored for a career spanning four decades “on the front line of water quality issues.”  The Jefferson Award, now in its 39th year, is named for Thomas Jefferson and was founded by former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis as a “Nobel Prize for public service.” Two other recipients of the Jefferson Award this year were Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and actress Marlo Thomas.

In its presentation, the Jefferson Awards Board of Selectors said Cronin “has dedicated his career to water and environmental affairs. Described as ‘Hero for the Planet’ and ‘equal parts detective, scientist and public advocate’, his efforts have inspired a legacy of programs across the globe, fighting pollution on six continents.”

In remarks at the ceremony, Cronin credited folksinger Pete Seeger and Pace University as his sources of inspiration. “When Pete took me under his wing in 1973, he said, ‘If we all work together we can change the Hudson River; we can even change the world.’ At the time I thought it impossible but his words proved to be the truest I have ever heard. Pace University lives by that credo and has given me the opportunity to reach thousands.  We all stand on the shoulders of giants. I have been privileged to stand on theirs.”

Remarking on Pace University’s nomination of Cronin, President Stephen J. Friedman said, “Higher education has a duty to public service, social good and environmental protection. As our senior fellow for environmental affairs at the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, John Cronin is  an exemplar of our university-wide commitment to that mission. John has served the Pace community since 1985 when he co-founded the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic, but his lifelong service on behalf of water issues locally and globally has benefitted us all for almost four decades.”

Cronin’s work has reached into every corner of environmentalism.  A Time magazine “Hero for the Planet,” he began as a pollution hunter for the “People’s Pipewatch” at the Clearwater organization in 1973 where evidence he collected caused the first successful federal prosecution in New York State under the new Clean Water Act. He served as environmental advisor to Congressman Hamilton Fish, Jr. and Assemblyman Maurice Hinchey, and as the pollution-fighting Hudson Riverkeeper for 17 years, where his work inspired the creation of nearly 200 “Keeper” programs around the world.  He authored the Hudson River Estuary Management Act, considered a model for ecosystem management, wrote “The Riverkepers” with Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., made an award-winning film about commercial fishermen, and co-founded the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities, the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic, and Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries, where he has served as director and CEO for five years.

Congressman Maurice Hinchey said of Cronin’s Jefferson Award, “I’ve had the pleasure of working with John Cronin to protect and restore the Hudson River for three decades and am delighted that his many years of hard work and dedicated efforts have been recognized through this award. The Hudson Valley has played a leading role in the development of the modern environmental movement, and John Cronin has made important contributions to that legacy.”

About the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies

The Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, the first Pace University Center for Excellence is a University-wide initiative that draws upon representatives from each School and College, senior administration, University Relations and other strategic expertise within the institution.  Pace University is uniquely positioned to approach environmental issues in a truly interdisciplinary fashion. The Pace Academy engages expertise across the departments within the University’s Schools and College, to advance the understanding of the mutually enhancing relationship between nature and society. Through its programs, Pace Academy foster s curricular, scholarly, policy, and experiential, practice-based opportunities for our students, faculty, and broader community.

About Pace University:

For 105 years, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact:

Cara Cea 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu