Pace Inclusion Programs and New HBO Film Highlight Growing Understanding of Autism

One of the nation’s most experienced pioneers in autism is Dianne Zager, PhD, a vibrant professor of education at Pace University in New York City. She is increasingly known for developing alternatives for older students with autism in regular, non- “special” college classes.

Contact: Cara Cea, Pace University, 914-773-3312, cell 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

EXPERT ADVISORY: HBO film starring Clare Danes marks changing attitudes to autism

The heavily-promoted HBO film forthcoming Saturday night, February 6 at 8:00pm about Temple Grandin, played by Claire Danes, is possibly the biggest publicity splash yet for promoting understanding and appreciation of individuals with learning and behavior differences. Grandin, an international advocate for autism, has autism herself. Her life challenges and accomplishments create a powerful story of human spirit and shed light on the mystery of autism.

One of the nation’s most experienced pioneers in autism is Dianne Zager, PhD, a vibrant professor of education at Pace University in New York City. She is increasingly known for developing alternatives for older students with autism in regular, non- “special” college classes.

Zager is well-informed and articulate, and is available for independent pre and post screening comments on the film and the growing concern for providing needed services for people on the spectrum. Disclosure: Grandin wrote the introduction for Zager’s latest textbook. Pace has just chosen the bestselling book, “The Curious Case of the Dog in the Nighttime,” about a boy with autism, for its University-wide common reading this summer.

State of the Union, State of the Stimulus – Pace Offers Case Studies

Pace University today announced that to date it has received eight federal stimulus awards totaling $1.8 million to fund research and community projects at its schools of computing, education, nursing, and law. Pace has submitted 32 stimulus proposals, of which we have received eight to date. The eight awards are:

Efficient energy for the environment. An enlarged Northeast Clean Energy Application Center to promote co-generation and other high efficiency, low emission power systems will be the result of the largest grant. The Pace Energy and Climate Center at Pace Law School will share $952,000 from the U.S. Department of Energy with the Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at the University of Massachusetts.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts: Pace Public Information: Bill Caldwell, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu, or Chris Cory, 212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY WINS $1.8 MILLION IN STIMULUS FUNDING

Projects involve

• green energy for the Northeast US,

• help for NYC’s Chinatown,

• new teaching methods

• mentoring for urban service careers

• nursing scholarships for disadvantaged students

• a NYC entrepreneurship website

New York, NY, January 27, 2010 –– Pace University today announced that to date it has received eight federal stimulus awards totaling $1.8 million to fund research and community projects at its schools of computing, education, nursing, and law. Pace has submitted 32 stimulus proposals, of which we have received eight to date. The eight awards are:

Efficient energy for the environment. An enlarged Northeast Clean Energy Application Center to promote co-generation and other high efficiency, low emission power systems will be the result of the largest grant. The Pace Energy and Climate Center at Pace Law School will share $952,000 from the U.S. Department of Energy with the Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at the University of Massachusetts.

The Northeast region has significant potential for supplying alternative clean energy technologies like combined heat and power generation (“cogeneration”), waste heat recovery systems, and district energy systems. Besides environmental benefits, using less energy and other efficiencies will reduce the dollars flowing out of the region to pay for energy. The center serves New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine.

The clean energy center also received $55,027 from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) to help with a 2009 conference that identified market based strategies to achieve energy conservation and a cleaner environment.

The Principal Investigator is Thomas G. Bourgeois, the deputy director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center, tbourgeois@law.pace.edu.

Relief to NYC Downtown and, Chinatown. Pace’s Community and Volunteer Mobilization AmeriCorps Program received $347,403 through New York State to deepen and broaden its service to needy and vulnerable people in New York City’s Downtown and Chinatown communities. Schools and nonprofit organizations there have been pinched by the economic crisis, and the grant will help place Pace students in after-school programs and as classroom assistants, tutors, college counselors, and instructors in English and US citizenship. The students are recruited for a year of service and learning by Pace’s Dyson Center for Undergraduate Research Experiences, working closely with the Pace Office of Co-op and Career Services.

The Principal Investigator is Professor Maria Iacullo-Bird, Executive Director of the Pace Center for Undergraduate Research Experiences, miacullobird@pace.edu.

Collaborative groups for teacher learning. Teaching based on inquiries raised and researched by high school students is increasing in US schools. To help teachers learn this methodology, Pace’s School of Education received $261,870 to partner with four secondary schools it partners with — Pace High School and Millennium High School in New York City, and Peekskill High School and Sleepy Hollow High School in Westchester County. Facilitators from the School of Education are meeting 15 times during the current school year with groups from the schools to develop the schools’ capacity to create, implement and evaluate collaborative groups of their own in which teachers raise inquiries. The project will culminate in a Teaching and Learning Conference for all stakeholders.

The Principal Investigators are Professors Christine Clayton and James Kilbane, cclayton@pace.edu and jkilbane@pace.edu. The funds come through the New York State Education Department Teacher/Leader Quality Partnership Programs.

Mentoring for urban service careers. Pace undergraduate and graduate students who are planning educationally-related urban careers in teaching, psychology, and speech pathology are getting personalized mentoring via a grant of $74,432 through the New York State Education Department to Pace’s Teacher Opportunity Corps. To improve the students’ success and retention, the program is offering personalized tutoring in service learning and instructional technology, and in career-related decision-making in areas like writing academic projects and grant applications, applying for scholarships, and career planning. Qualified participants also get stipends and undergraduate seminar credits.

The Principal Investigator is professor Mary Rose McCarthy, mmccarthy2@pace.edu.

Expanded nursing scholarships and loans. Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing received $15,256 (in part from Stimulus funds) from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration to offer scholarships to disadvantaged nursing students. The same agency also awarded the school $52,414 for its Nurse Faculty Loan Program, a loan fund for full and part-time students working toward an MA in Nursing Education. Recipients who complete the program may cancel up to 85% of their NFLP loan if they serve for four consecutive years as a full-time faculty member at a school of nursing.

Principal Investigator for the scholarships is professor Susan Gordon, sgordon@pace.edu; for the loan fund it is professor Marilyn Jaffe-Ruiz, mjafferuiz@pace.edu.

A New York City entrepreneurship website. Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems and its Pace Web Solutions Development Team received $90,000 to help the New York City Economic Development Corporation create a centralized Web portal for entrepreneurs. The portal will showcase New York as a center of entrepreneurial opportunity and become a go-to site providing information, resources and contact points for start-ups, entrepreneurs and investors of all sizes. The Pace team of technologists, Web developers and entrepreneurs will serve as a consulting group on the portal’s architecture and content, identifying the best available Web technologies.

The Principal Investigator is Professor Jonathan Hill, jhill@pace.edu, with Professors Bruce Bachenheimer and Claudia Green.

Overall assessment

“We are very pleased with the opportunistic faculty members who have taken advantage of the uniqueness of this generous funding to support the University’s many efforts to help stimulate the economy,” said Victor Goldsmith, Associate Provost for Sponsored Research and Economic Development at Pace. “Our students and faculty members are working hard on a variety of projects, and we hope to continue securing additional stimulus funds with them in the current federal fiscal year.”

To date Pace has submitted 32 stimulus proposals, of which 16 are still pending. The process for new stimulus proposal submissions is expected to end in September 2010.

About Pace

For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube .

Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Pace bachelor of science programs in computer science and information systems reaccredited by ABET

The bachelor of science programs in computer science and information systems at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems have been reaccredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc., the recognized accreditor of college and university programs in applied science, computing, engineering, and technology.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

Pace University keeps “only in New York” status in computing

Reaccreditation of BS programs makes Pace only school in state accredited for Information Systems by ABET organization, one of ten for Computer Science

New York, NY, October 20, 2009 – The bachelor of science programs in computer science and information systems at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems have been reaccredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc., the recognized accreditor of college and university programs in applied science, computing, engineering, and technology.

The organization’s decision to reaffirm accreditation makes the Seidenberg School the only one in New York State accredited for information systems, and one of ten accredited for computer science.

“Seidenberg was one of the first schools in the country to put software and hardware in a unified curriculum, and I am pleased that ABET, Inc., continues to affirm the quality of our programs,” said Constance A. Knapp, MBA, PhD, Interim Dean of the Seidenberg School.

Accreditation is a voluntary peer-review process that requires programs to undergo comprehensive, periodic evaluations. The evaluations are conducted by teams of volunteer professionals working in industry, government, academe, and private practice within the ABET disciplines. They focus on areas including program curricula, faculty, facilities, and institutional support.

Guide for students, parents and employers and graduate schools

A key requirement of ABET accreditation is that programs continuously improve their quality. As part of this requirement, programs must set specific, measurable goals for their students and graduates, assess their success at reaching those goals, and improve their programs based on the results.

In addition to providing a structured mechanism for colleges and universities to assess, evaluate, and improve their programs, accreditation also helps students and their parents choose quality college programs, enables employers and graduate schools to recruit graduates they know are well-prepared, and is used by registration, licensure, and certification boards to screen applicants.

About ABET

ABET is a not-for-profit organization, owned and operated by its more than 25 professional and technical member societies. An internationally respected organization with some 1,500 volunteers, ABET has set the higher-educational standards in its fields for nearly 75 years. More information about ABET, its member societies, and the evaluation criteria used to accredit programs can be found at www.abet.org.

About Pace

For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Michelle Rhee, D.C. School Chancellor, To Kick off Annual Education Lecture Series

Some of the nation’s most influential advocates of urban school reform will appear starting Wednesday, February 11 in the Pace University School of Education’s seventh annual lecture series on urban school reform. This year’s theme is “The Pedagogy of Success in Urban Schools.”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Cara Halstead Cea, Pace University, 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu

Arthur Maloney, EdD, Pace School of Education, 212-346-1347, amaloney@pace.edu

Note: Photos are available of Rhee and most other participants

MICHELLE RHEE, CONTROVERSIAL D.C. PUBLIC SCHOOL CHANCELLOR, TO KICK OFF ANNUAL PACE UNIVERSITY LECTURES BY NATIONAL FIGURES IN PUBLIC SCHOOL REFORM

“Success in Urban Schools” to be theme of well-attended after-school sessions near City Hall

NEW YORK, NY – Some of the nation’s most influential advocates of urban school reform will appear starting Wednesday, February 11 in the Pace University School of Education’s seventh annual lecture series on urban school reform. This year’s theme is “The Pedagogy of Success in Urban Schools.”

Presented from 6-8 pm after the school day, the series regularly fills Pace’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts in downtown Manhattan. The center , part of Pace University’s downtown Manhattan campus, is east of City Hall, entrance on Spruce Street between Gold and Park Row. The lectures are free and open to the public. Media admission by press pass.

Due to its popularity, those outside the city can now view the series through the Dutchess County Board of Cooperative Educational Services at 5 BOCES Road in Poughkeepsie, 845-486-4800.

Over the years the series has drawn virtually every eminent U.S. voice for improvement in elementary and secondary schools.

This year’s stellar lineup begins with Michelle A. Rhee, Chancellor of the public school system in Washington DC. In less than two years, her efforts to shake up this notorious system and insist on more accountability for results have made her a media celebrity, featured in Time, Newsweek, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, and on NPR, PBS, and C-SPAN. Last week a Christian Science Monitor article asked “Is Michelle Rhee the new face of education reform?” She is known to many in the New York schools for the work done on teacher hiring practices by an organization she founded, The New Teacher Project.

More information on the series is available at http://www.pace.edu/page.cfm?doc_id=8403 or from professor Arthur Maloney at (212) 346-1512 or amaloney@pace.edu.

The complete schedule, Spring 2009: February 11 Michelle A. Rhee, Chancellor, Washington, DC Public Schools National Educational Reform Talked about as a possible cabinet member in the Obama administration, Rhee is a former Baltimore, Maryland teacher in the Teach for America (TFA) program who is known for her concentration on the ways teachers are hired and promoted. Five years after her stint in TFA she founded The New Teacher Project, which develops fresh approaches to hiring new teachers in environments that are difficult to staff. Collaborating with constituencies including not only school districts but state education agencies, nonprofit organizations and unions; TNTP has changed teacher hiring in Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago, Miami, New York, Oakland, and Philadelphia, helping to place some 23,000 teachers. Rhee holds a bachelor’s degree in government from Cornell and a master’s in public policy from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard.

March 9 Martin Haberman, EdD, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee The Ideology and Behaviors of Star Teachers Serving Students in Poverty Martin Habermanis credited with developing more teacher education programs preparing teachers to work with poor children than anyone in the history of US education. The most widely known is the National Teacher Corps, based on an internship program he developed in Milwaukee. He has since written and researched extensively about what makes teachers and students successful in urban schools. Haberman also is the creator of a successful interview program that helps urban schools hire and retain qualified teachers and is now used by more than 220 school districts around the country. Although he officially retired in 2005 after 43 years on the faculty of the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Haberman remains more active than ever. He currently heads the Haberman Educational Foundation, which prepares teachers, principals, and superintendents to work with economically diverse school systems and students. Holding both a master’s and a doctorate in teacher education from Teachers College, Columbia University, he is the author of seven books. The latest, published in 2005, is “Star Teachers of Children in Poverty.”

March 25 Carol Ann Tomlinson, EdD, University of Virginia Differentiated Instruction in Urban Classrooms: Why and How Tomlinson is one of the nation’s foremost authorities on differentiation of instruction for academically diverse learners and the effects of varied school and teaching practices on low income and minority learners. Her 15 books alsohave dealt with the change process in schools moving toward more academically responsive classrooms. The program coordinator for the Educational Psychology/Gifted Education program at the University of Virginia, she also serves as co-director of the school’s Institutes on Academic Diversity. Formerly a public school teacher for 21 years at the high school, preschool, and middle school levels, she was Virginia’s Teacher of the Year in 1974 and was named “Outstanding Professor” at the UVA Curry School of Education in 2004; her books have been translated into 12 languages. Tomlinson holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of South Carolina, a master’s degree from the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, and both a master’s and a doctorate in education from UVA.

April 1 Alfie Kohn, Lecturer and Author The Deadly Effects of Tougher Standards: Challenging High Stakes Testing and Other Impediments to Learning Kohn has been described by Time magazine as “perhaps the country’s most outspoken critic of education’s fixation on grades [and] test scores.” A wide-ranging speaker and writer, he has been critical of competition and rewards on TV and radio programs including “The Today Show” and “Oprah”, and in books like “Beyond Discipline: From Compliance to Community” (ASCD, 1996), which he describes as “a modest attempt to overthrow the entire field of classroom management.” Other titles include “Punished by Rewards” (1993), “The Schools Our Children Deserve: Moving Beyond Traditional Classrooms and “Tougher Standards” (1999), “The Case Against Standardized Testing” (2000), and most recently, “The Homework Myth (2006).

April 22 Rochelle Gutierrez, PhD, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Mathematics for Urban Students The research Gutierrez has done in urban high schools in the US and Mexico has made her an authority on the organizational, cultural, and pedagogical aspects of high school mathematics and how they apply to poor students and students of color. Her current research focuses on teaching that achieves equality in students’ mathematics participation. An associate professor of mathematics education and Latina/Latino studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, she presents examples of four successful teaching “stories” and will include aspects of organizational structures and teaching practices that contribute to success. She holds a bachelor’s degree in human biology from Stanford University and a master’s and doctorate in curriculum and instruction from the University of Chicago.

April 29 Carol D. Lee, PhD, Northwestern University Literacy for Urban Students Drawing on forms of prior knowledge that traditionally underserved students bring to classrooms, Lee has developed a theory of cultural modeling that provides a framework for the design and enactment of curriculum. In addition to serving as co-coordinator of the Spencer Research Training program in the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern, she is a founder and former director of the New Concept School, an African-centered independent school in Chicago, and a founder of the Betty Shabazz International Charter School in Chicago, a newly established African-centered charter school. Lee is the former president of the National Conference on Research in Language and Literacy and the chair of the standing committee on research of the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE). The author of Signifying as a Scaffold for Literary Interpretation: The Pedagogical Implications of an African American Discourse Genre. She is co-editor of a scholarly journal, Neo-Vygotskian Perspectives on Literacy Research. Lee holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Illinois at Urban-Champaign, a master’s in English from the University of Chicago, and an educational doctorate from the University of Chicago.

Professional education at Pace University: Since 1906 Pace University has offered professional education that combines liberal arts with practical experience and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York. It enrolls more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Evaluating Campuses, US Secretary of Ed. Spelling’s Speech

The possibility (threat?) of a Federal requirement for colleges to be assessed like “No Child Left Behind” schools gained momentum today as US Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings endorsed recommendations about campus “accountability” from her commission on the future of higher education. The issue is propelled by factors like rising college costs and disenchantment with popular rankings like those of US News.

To: Editors

Advisory re “Maverick” campus view of Education Secretary Spellings speech on judging colleges

The possibility (threat?) of a Federal requirement for colleges to be assessed like “No Child Left Behind” schools gained momentum today as US Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings endorsed recommendations about campus “accountability” from her commission on the future of higher education. The issue is propelled by factors like rising college costs and disenchantment with popular rankings like those of US News.

• Pace University as far as we know is the only university to have produced a 32-page case-report on its self-assessment activities, “A Blueprint for Accountability: Lessons from the Pace University Experience” (at www.pace.edu/assessment).
• It describes early use of two new tests now gaining favor.
• It outlines other initiatives that we predict will become more readily accepted at other universities.
• It shows examples of how self-assessment can increase student learning and lead to a more coherent college experience.
• It reflects the self-described “maverick” views of Pace President David A. Caputo: Unlike many private college leaders he favors emerging new assessment techniques to measure how effectively colleges promote learning and help them get better at it.
• But he thinks some of the remedies endorsed by Spellings are not the way to improve U.S. colleges and universities and may be distractions from addressing larger issues in society like poverty and opportunity.

Let me know if you are interested.

Second Careers, First Loves: Retraining Professionals for Teaching

Pace University School of Education is providing an entry point into the teaching profession for career changers and college graduates who have had no previous formal study in the field of education. Since 1986, the Career Change Master of Science for Teachers (M.S.T.) degree program has enabled approximately 500 people to enter a new, more fulfilling second career.

Contact: Steve Borzoni
(212) 346-1851

NEW YORK-Pace University School of Education is providing an entry point into the teaching profession for career changers and college graduates who have had no previous formal study in the field of education. Since 1986, the Career Change Master of Science for Teachers (M.S.T.) degree program has enabled approximately 500 people to enter a new, more fulfilling second career.

One of those people is Sam Friedman of Yonkers, N.Y., who began attending classes at Pace after retiring as a satellite communications engineer at RCA. After completing the M.S.T. program, he was offered a position at the Graphic Communications Arts High School in New York City where he teaches mathematics. “My relationship with these students has been very gratifying,” says Friedman. “Working to help these kids become better students brings me a much deeper sense of satisfaction than building better satellites.”

With the M.S.T. degree and satisfactory scores on the New York State Teacher Certification Examination, students with baccalaureate degrees in fields other than education become provisionally certified to teach. They become eligible for permanent certification after two years of full-time teaching. The 36-credit program provides both theoretical frameworks and opportunities for their practical application. Students explore the different ways individuals learn, and develop their unique teaching style to meet the needs of individual students.

The average age of an M.S.T. student is about 30, although students have ranged in age from 22 to 62. Many students come to the program with experience in business and finance, science, technology, arts and communications, as well as government, military and medical backgrounds. Most are offered public school positions teaching at the elementary level.

Dr. Carol Keyes, chair of the Teacher Education department, recognizes that “the program is attracting mature professionals, who have had successful careers but now want to teach.”

“Many students find the communications, writing, managerial and organizational skills learned in their previous careers most useful when they are teaching in the classroom,” says Dr. Sandra Flank, professor of education.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.

dditional Funding Not the Sole Answer for Urban Schools, says Pace Professor and Author

More funding for urban schools is only half the way to fix them, according to Barry A. Gold, PhD., an expert on organizational change who is Associate Professor of Management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business and author of a just-published study of recent school finance changes in New Jersey, Still Separate And Unequal: Segregation And The Future Of Urban School Reform (Teachers College Press, 2007).

Contact: Cara Halstead Cea, Pace University Public Information, 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu, or Barry Allen Gold, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Management, Lubin School of Business, Pace University, bgold@pace.edu

Pace University Management Professor available for comment on Increased New York City School Funding

Additional Funding Not the Sole Answer for Urban Schools, says Author of New Book

New research, also weighing No Child Left Behind, supports planned diversity, tactic at issue in US Supreme Court case to be decided this spring

More funding for urban schools is only half the way to fix them, according to Barry A. Gold, PhD., an expert on organizational change who is Associate Professor of Management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business and author of a just-published study of recent school finance changes in New Jersey, Still Separate And Unequal: Segregation And The Future Of Urban School Reform (Teachers College Press, 2007).

Gold’s research shows that to improve educational opportunity for urban students, teachers need to teach them the same way suburban students are taught. Moreover, some form of integration is necessary.

Gold documents and analyzes the implementation of the first four years of the landmark 1998 New Jersey Supreme Court Abbott V ruling and the first three years of the 2002 federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) act. In four high-poverty, low-achievement urban elementary schools in New Jersey, these unprecedented reforms proposed to change all elements of the schools except their population characteristics — two were African American and two were Latino. Hence a related but more important research question was: Can separate education be equal? According to Gold, the answer is still no.

Gold found that teaching and learning did not improve and, in many cases, became less effective. This was primarily because administrators and teachers rejected the reforms or modified them to fit their idea of appropriate education for urban students, which as they understand it is different than the kind that suits suburban students. By focusing on test scores, in a powerful example of an unintended consequence NCLB actually increased the use of ineffective teaching methods—rote drill and obsessive reiteration of “the basics”—that often are used in the urban education that the Abbott V mandates tried to change.

According to Gold, the lingering socio-cultural ecology of segregation, which Abbott V and NCLB did not try to alter, insidiously reproduced the less effective kind of urban education.

In June 2007, the United States Supreme Court will rule on the use of planned diversity to achieve racial balance in public schools. The January 8, 2007 edition of the NPR program “Justice Talking” <http://www.justicetalking.com/viewprogram.asp?progID=580> is an excellent debate on the complex issues. Still Separate and Unequal: Segregation and the Future of Urban School Reform supports planned diversity to improve equality of educational opportunity, particularly under the conditions of extreme segregation that characteristic of most metropolitan regions in the United States.

Freeman Hrabowski to Speak on Cultural Diversity as Key to International Competitiveness

Freeman A. Hrabowski, PhD, president of the University of Maryland – Baltimore County (UMBC) and one of the few African-Americans to run a predominantly white research institution will speak about “Fostering Inclusion in Academia”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

** MEDIA ADVISORY**

EDUCATION INNOVATOR TO WARN
THAT CULTURAL DIVERSITY IS KEY
TO INTERNATIONAL COMPETITIVENESS

Innovative African-American president of University of Maryland/Baltimore County
to discuss lessons for widening inclusion
in Centennial speech at Pace University

WHO: Freeman A. Hrabowski, PhD, president of the University of Maryland – Baltimore County (UMBC) and one of the few African-Americans to run a predominantly white research institution will speak about “Fostering Inclusion in Academia”

WHEN: February 9, 2006, 12:00p.m.

WHERE: Pace University
One Pace Plaza, Multi-Purpose Room
New York, NY
* This event is free and open to the public
** Attending media must be credentialed

WHAT: Kicking off Black History Month, Freeman Hrabowski will join forces with Pace to speak about the United States’ capacity to respond to and embrace its growing diversity as a major determinant of global competitiveness. Hrabowski believes that colleges and universities will have a central role to play in preparing Americans for these changes.

Hrabowski has spent the majority of his professional career studying and improving minority academic participation and achievement. He has been enormously successful in producing a pipeline of minority graduates who go on to top graduate and professional schools and earn advanced degrees. Hrabowski was named a top innovator by Fast Company magazine.

This presentation is an early event in Pace University’s 2006 Centennial Celebration, marking Pace’s evolution into a full range private university providing opportunity and educating achievers in liberal arts and sciences, business, nursing, education, information technology and law.

For more information, please log-on to www.pace.edu/centennial

CONTACT: Cara Halstead Cea, Pace University, 914-773-3312, chalstead@pace.edu

Rosemary Mercedes, Pace University, 212-346-1637, rmercedes@pace.edu

Caputo Takes Strong Stance Against Education Legislation

As Congress debates the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act, Pace University President David A. Caputo is taking a strong stance against legislation to put price controls on college tuition. In the January issue of University Business, President Caputo, in the cover story, details his view that alternative solutions like tuition guarantees promise greater effectiveness.

**MEDIA ADVISORY**

Pace University President Discusses Access,
Affordability and Accountability

WHAT: As Congress debates the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act, Pace University President David A. Caputo is taking a strong stance against legislation to put price controls on college tuition. In the January issue of University Business, President Caputo, in the cover story, details his view that alternative solutions like tuition guarantees promise greater effectiveness.

Caputo believes:

• Higher education is already regulated, ultimately by the consumer.
• “There are many already existing bases for accountability, and one- which I think Republican lawmakers especially would be attracted to- is, in fact, the market.”
• Presently-proposed language “that requires each institution to have an evaluation plan” is sound. Nationally-mandated testing and procedures for campus evaluation are not.
• Rigid financial reporting requirements would penalize programs like Pace’s guaranteed tuition, which freezes a student’s first-year tuition for up to five years.

WHO: David A. Caputo, President of Pace University, is available to speak to issues of access and affordability.

The University Business article can be found at http://www.universitybusiness.com/page.cfm?p=1116

CONTACT:

Lauren Schwartz
M Booth & Associates
212-481-7000 x615
laurensch@mbooth.com

Chris Cory
Pace University
212-346-1117
ccory@pace.edu

NYC Mayoral Candidate Gifford Miller to speak at Pace on Thursday

Please join Speaker Gifford Miller at Pace University, as he addresses one of the most important issues facing our City

THIS RELEASE COMES FROM THE MAYORAL CAMPAIGN OF GIFFORD MILLER, WHO IS SPEAKING AT PACE ON THURSDAY. – Chris Cory, Executive Director of Public Information

SCHEDULE ADVISORY Contact:
Reggie Johnson – 917.443.9753
Maria Alvarado – 917.518.3734

MILLER TO DELIVER EDUCATION POLICY SPEECH

This Thursday (June 16th) Speaker Gifford Miller, candidate for mayor, will lay out his plan to create a world-class public education system in New York City that better prepares every New York City child for the future. The speech is the second in a series in which Miller details how as mayor he will take New York in a new direction. The speech will be delivered at Pace University at 11:00AM.
on June 16th.
Please join Speaker Miller as he addresses one of the most important issues facing our City.

When: Thursday, June 16th @ 11:00am
Where: Pace University
Multi Purpose Room
Spruce Street entrance (between Nassau and Gold Streets)

4/5/6 to Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall
A/C, 4/5, J/M/Z to Broadway-Nassau, 2/3 to Fulton