Fox 5 TV Good Day New York: Battle Over Teacher Evaluations Plan

Good Day New York spoke with Andrea Spencer, Dean of the School of Education at Pace, about the fight in New York over teacher evaluations.

From Fox 5: Gov. Andrew Cuomo is demanding teacher evaluations be put into place as has Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

The United Federation of Teachers is fighting the plan.

Good Day New York spoke with Andrea Spencer, Dean of the School of Education at Pace, about the fight over evaluations.

See video clip here:

Battle Over Teacher Evaluations Plan.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University education students to practice on virtual students

Pace education school launches ‘TLE TeachLivE™ Lab’ technology in partnership with University of Central Florida. Pace is the only university in the northeast using this technology.

Education school launches ‘TLE TeachLivE™ Lab’ technology in partnership with University of Central Florida, is only university in the northeast using the technology

Opening ceremonies with demonstrations January 18 and 19

 

NEW YORK, NY, January 13, 2012 – This spring semester student teacher candidates at Pace University will have to face those inevitable unruly students who do things like jump out of their seats and make rude gestures.

But the students will be virtual avatars shown on a digital SMART board.

Next week student demonstrations of this new simulation technology, part WII, part Steven Spielberg-esque  modern movie making, and based on research profiles of typical and sometimes challenging students, will take place in downtown New York City and in Pleasantville, in Westchester County, as Pace’s school of education inaugurates its pioneering use of the system.

The New York City demonstration (including explanations by faculty members, a ribbon-cutting ceremony, and a reception) will be held Wednesday, January 18 at One Pace Plaza, across from City Hall, room W210, from 4:30-6:00 p.m.

The Pleasantville demonstration will be Thursday, January 19 at 861 Bedford Road, entrance #2, Miller Hall, room 15A, from 4:00-5:30pm. Media admission by press pass.

The technology is known as the TLE TeachLivE™ Labs. (The TLE stands for the initials of “Teach” and “Live” with an emphasized “E” for education). Pace is the only school in the northeast and one of only ten universities in the US to use this technology, which can help with teacher preparation, professional development of in-service educators,  and research on teacher effectiveness.

Developed some four years ago at the University of  Central Florida, which is partnering with Pace, the TeachLivE™ system presents a class of digital “avatar” five students, whose personality types and detailed back stories were developed by UCF researchers based on research. Like the Wizard of Oz, behind the scenes UCF staffers work as “interactors,” seeing and hearing the student teachers by web cam and acting out the personality types in real time, including their jumps and gestures. Computer sensors attached to the actors transmit their movements to the avatars.

“This experience gave me confidence”

Pilot testing this summer showed that before they teach in a real classroom, Pace teacher candidates giving lessons on, for example, persuasive writing and science developed an understanding of the complexities of adult/child relations and could practice communicating effectively and managing classrooms.

Said one student, “I was very nervous to teach. I always have questions about my abilities. ‘What if I don’t know the answer” or “what if I am a bad teacher?” This experience gave me confidence.”

Some students in the test groups observed and recorded avatar behavior. Some practiced with the avatars on a simulated first day of school, trying to create classroom community, communicate expectations, and get students excited about learning. All refined instructional approaches and classroom management plans. The system was used as part of coursework in special education, science education, and educational psychology.

During the spring semester, ten Pace classes with a total of over 300 students are scheduled to use TeachLivE. The Pace School of Education has an avatar lab on both its New York City and Pleasantville campuses.

TLE TeachLivE™ Labs won the 2012 Innovative Technology Award from the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE).

Some Pace professors have used TeachLivE on a one-on-one basis where the teacher observes the student and offers feedback. Others have used it on a peer-to-peer basis where students present during class and students give each other feedback in addition to the teacher feedback. Using TLE TeachLivE™, Pace has found, encourages rehearsal and experimentation.

Pace and the other nine universities partnering with UCF are beta sites that have assisted with further development of the system, expansion of the scenarios and creation of a long term research agenda.

For more information on The TLE TeachLivE™ Labs and to see them in action, visit: http://webpage.pace.edu/soe/TeachLivE/.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

 

TeenBusinessForum: “Why Entrepreneurs Should Celebrate Global Entrepreneurship Week”

Global Entrepreneurship Week (November 14 – 20, 2011) is the world’s largest celebration of the innovators and job creators who launch startups that bring ideas to life, drive economic growth and expand human welfare. So why should entrepreneurs celebrate it?

7. To Celebrate The Entrepreneurial Mindset

Because entrepreneurship is a mindset — a way of thinking and acting, not simply about starting a business. It is about imagining new ways to solve problems and create value. These skills are important not only for those seeking to establish a new venture, but are increasingly critical in a wide variety of careers given today’s hyper-competitive marketplace, where rapid technological innovation and globalization has led to corporate downsizing and a dramatic change in the very nature of work.

Bruce Bachenheimer, Clinical Professor and Director of Entrepreneurship, Pace University

To read the other 19 responses on TeenBusinessForum, where teens discuss entrepreneurship, click here 

MEDIA EVENT ALERT, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5: Go INSIDE The Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University for a FREE Master Class on The Method and The Stanislavski System

The Theater Master Class will be conducted by Andreas Manolikakis, Chair of the Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University and members of the MFA program’s faculty. For more information or to be considered for participation, send your resume and contact information to actorsstudiomfa@pace.edu or call 212-346-1531.

CALLING ALL ASPIRING ACTORS, DIRECTORS, PLAYWRIGHTS …

MEDIA EVENT ALERT: FREE THEATER MASTER CLASS

Saturday, November 5, 2011, 1- 4 PM

Go INSIDE The Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University for a FREE Master Class on The Method and The Stanislavski System.

The Master Class will be conducted by Andreas Manolikakis, Chair of the Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University and members of the MFA program’s faculty.

Unique Aspects of The Actors Studio Drama School:

  • The Actors Studio Drama School is the only MFA program officially sanctioned and supervised by the legendary Actors Studio.
  • It is the only school that offers the authenticity, continuity and authority of the Stanislavski System and the Method.
  • The curriculum has been designed and supervised by the leadership of the Actors Studio, including the Presidents of the Actors Studio, Ellen Burstyn, Harvey Keitel and Al Pacino.
  • Faculty members include major figures at the Actors Studio, many of them Moderators, Board Members and Associate Artistic Directors of the Actors Studio.
  • All students — actors, directors, playwrights — train side-by-side as actors.
  • All students participate in the Craft Seminars known to the world as the Bravo Network TV series “Inside the Actors Studio,” hosted by James Lipton.
  • In Friday Workshops the MFA candidates are exposed to different elements of the theater, such as script analysis, design, stage combat, directing, and auditioning for plays, musicals, film and television.
  • All MFA dance courses are taught by the famous and prestigious Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater at their uptown studios.
  • All students participate in an Observership Program at the Actors Studio.
  • All MFA black-box studios for professional training are designed and equipped according to state-of-the-art standards.
  • Located at prominent and easily reached campus in downtown New York City.

Repertory Season and Industry Showcase:

  • In their final year, all Actors Studio Drama School students present their work to the professional world and the public, in a fully-produced professional Repertory Season at a theater in downtown Manhattan. 
  • In addition, after the Repertory Season, our actors present their work to representatives from the theater, film and television industries in an Industry Showcase at the Actors Studio itself in midtown Manhattan.

After Graduation:

  • All students have the privilege, for one year, of the status of Working Finalist at the Actors Studio itself, which means they are eligible to attend weekly sessions and take a Final Audition for Studio Membership, bypassing the usual Preliminary Audition. Some of these students, if they successfully pass their Final Audition, will become Lifetime Members of the Actors Studio.
  • All directing and playwriting students are invited, for at least one year, to be part of the Playwrights and Directors Workshop of the Actors Studio, a unit especially created for the continuation of the training of our directing and playwriting graduates.

Next Steps:

For more information or to be considered for participation, send your resume and contact information to actorsstudiomfa@pace.edu or call 212-346-1531. Attendees must hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university or be within one semester of graduation. Admissions representatives will be available to answer your questions.

Media Contact:

Samuella Becker, sbecker2@pace.edu, 212-346-1637 or 917-734-5172

NEWS RELEASE: NYC Schools Chancellor Walcott and Youth Commissioner Mullgrav to Give Keynotes at Conference

The Partnership for After School Education (PASE) and Pace University’s School of Education have partnered to host the 2011 PASE Conference at Pace’s New York City campus at One Pace Plaza on Monday, July 18, 8:00am – 5:00pm. Chancellor Dennis Walcott of the NYC Department of Education and Commissioner Jeanne Mullgrav of the NYC Department of Youth and Community Development are the keynote speakers. (Left: Chancellor Dennis Walcott).

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

NYC Schools Chancellor Walcott and Youth Commissioner Mullgrav to Give Keynotes at Conference on After School Programming July 18 at Pace University New York City campus

Latest trends in after school programs to be examined and taught

New York, NY – July 11, 2011 –  The Partnership for After School Education (PASE) and Pace University’s School of Education have partnered to host the 2011 PASE Conference at Pace’s New York City campus at One Pace Plaza on Monday, July 18, 8:00am – 5:00pm. Chancellor Dennis Walcott of the NYC Department of Education and Commissioner Jeanne Mullgrav of the NYC Department of Youth and Community Development are the keynote speakers. More than 350 participants are expected.

“Afterschool: Leadership, Program, Impact,” the only conference of its kind in NYC, offers 39 interactive workshops and panel discussions as well as networking for youth practitioners and educators, foundations and advocacy groups. Leading practitioners from the afterschool field will share resources like the Afterschool Youth Outcomes Inventory, a comprehensive tool for use in assessing and articulating program impact on youth. Some workshops satisfy School Age Child Care (SACC) regulations for child care program development credits.

To register or to find out more about the 2011 PASE Conference at Pace University, please visit the PASE website at www.pasesetter.org. Conference fees are $100 for the first participant from an organization/school and $30 for every participant thereafter. For grassroots organizations with budgets of $250,000 or less, limited scholarships are available. Media admission by press pass.

Conference Strands and Workshop Descriptions

“Afterschool: Leadership, Program, and Impact” will address critical aspects of providing and sustaining high quality afterschool programs.

Leadership – Effective leadership is imperative to any successful organization. Topics covered in this strand include capacity building for small agencies and afterschool leadership.

Program – Content is at the core of every afterschool program in order to be engaging, fun, and educational. Topics covered in this strand include global learning, violence prevention, college prep, and social/emotional learning.

Impact – Workshops will focus on outcomes, results, and quality in afterschool programs with tools for measuring and communicating impact.

A complete list of workshops and descriptions can be found at: http://pasesetter.org/conference/documents/2011PASEConference_WorkshopDescriptions.pdf.

Commissioner Jeanne Mullgrav

About The Partnership For Afterschool Education (PASE)

The Partnership for After School Education (PASE) is a child-focused organization that promotes and supports quality afterschool programs, particularly those serving young people from underserved communities. An innovative pioneer in the development and advancement of the afterschool field, PASE was formed in 1993 to professionalize afterschool services so that providers could deliver consistent, high-quality programming to youth and increase their capacity to meet the needs of their communities. PASE is committed to providing the more than 1,600 organizations in its network with the support they need to provide the 500,000 young people in New York City’s afterschool programs with the high-quality services they deserve.

About Pace University

For 105 years, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact:

Chris Seamens, Communications Associate

Partnership for After School Education (PASE)

cseamens@pasesetter.org

Ph: 212-571-2664 ext.243

www.pasetter.org

The New York Times: “Top 10 List: Retooling for the Fastest-Growing Fields”

Jonathan Hill, assistant dean of Seidenberg School of Computer Science, was quoted in a New York Times article about the fastest growing career fields. By 2018, a million news jobs are expected to be available, such as Biomedical Engineer, Home Health Aide and Network Systems and Data Communications Analyst.

You can work in many locations as a Network Systems and Data Communications Analyst because almost every organization needs someone with those skill sets. “‘If you have the degree, you can work at Sloan-Kettering, the F.B.I., PNC Bank or the New York City Ballet,” he says. “If you are good, you will be employed.'”

Jonathan Hill, assistant dean of Seidenberg School of Computer Science, was quoted in a New York Times article about the fastest growing career fields. By 2018, a million news jobs are expected to be available, such as Biomedical Engineer, Home Health Aide and Network Systems and Data Communications Analyst.

You can work in many locations as a Network Systems and Data Communications Analyst because almost every organization needs someone with those skill sets. “If you have the degree, you can work at Sloan-Kettering, the F.B.I., PNC Bank or the New York City Ballet,” Hill says. “If you are good, you will be employed.”

To read the full article and get a detailed Top 10 List of the fast-growing fields, their salaries, why it’s growing, and the necessary training, visit The New York Times.

Visit Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science here.

NEWS ADVISORY—Supreme Court Decision on Church/State Boundaries

“Blurring the Lines,” by two Pace University professors of education, Arthur T. Maloney and Janet D. Mulvey, and a colleague at Fordham, argues that the First Amendment of the US Constitution –-the government can neither establish nor prohibit the practice of religion, “a mainstay of our democracy,” – is rapidly becoming obsolete.

NEW YORK, NY, April 5, 2011 — The US Supreme Court decided Monday to allow a tax credit for religious education in Arizona (see New York Times coverage). The decision is the latest move in

  • “a revolution”
  • spurred by “a nationwide offensive by religious groups to publicly fund their charter schools” in the name of preserving traditions and values,
  • that is replacing the nation’s “common” schools  with more “segregated learning environments,”
  • “undermin[ing] the greater democratic good and common ground for political unity,”
  • “may be pointing the way to a new wave of bitter societal and legal conflicts based on culture and religion,”
  • and creating increasingly “inequitable distribution of resources in public schools.”

So says a new, 141-page overview of that proliferating change and the issues it raises, “Blurring the Lines,” by two Pace University professors of education, Arthur T. Maloney and Janet D. Mulvey, and a colleague at Fordham, Bruce S. Cooper (Charlotte, NC, Information Age Publishing, www.infoagepub.com, 704-752-9125).

Maloney and Mulvey are available for interviews. Maloney – cell: 914-573-9665, amaloney@pace.edu. Mulvey – cell: 914-830-2321, jmulvey@pace.edu.

“Blurring the Lines” argues that the First Amendment of the US Constitution –-the government can neither establish nor prohibit the practice of religion, “a mainstay of our democracy,” – is rapidly becoming obsolete. The book provides case studies of

  • A Jewish charter school in Hollywood, Florida (the Ben Gamla Hebrew Charter School) and the Orthodox Jewish community public school in Kiryas Joel, New York;
  • Catholic conversions of failing parish schools into charters with full public funding in places like Washington, DC (the Trinidad Campus of Center City Public Charter Schools);
  • A Greek Orthodox parish in Brooklyn creating a new “Hellenic Classical Charter School,”
  • Muslims in Blaine and Inver Grove Heights, near Minneapolis, opening the Tarek ibn Ziyad Academy.

Media contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

NEWS RELEASE: Sexting and Cyberbullying Among Topics at Summit March 16

A news conference will be held Friday, January 28, when Verizon officially presents a grant at 3:30 p.m. in the Faculty Dining Room of Choate House on the Pleasantville Campus.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Safe use of mobile devices for young people to be advocated
at summit for students, educators, industry, policymakers

Sexting, cyberbullying, distracted driving
among topics at event in Pleasantville March 16

Partnership of Pace University and WiredSafety will challenge leaders to adopt best practices

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, January 25, 2010 – Safer use of mobile devices by young people will be the focus of a Mobile Safety Summit which will include challenges from students and educators to policymakers and the mobile device industry.

The event will take place on Pace University’s campus in Pleasantville, New York, on March 16.

The University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems is once again collaborating with the WiredSafety organization and its executive director, Parry Aftab, a leading international cybersafety expert. The Verizon Foundation is partially funding the events. The partners held a previous gathering on cyberbullying in 2008.

“Cyberbullying, sexting, and distracted driving are impacting youth, and solutions must include youth voices to be effective,” ” Aftab said. “This summit will bring educators and young people together with the industry, experts, and policymakers for a common goal – creating safer, well-designed, and innovative mobile offerings for everyone.”

Panels and breakout sessions will encourage participants to frame an action plan for moving forward on the best practices in mobile safety.

Additional details will be made available at a news conference Friday, January 28, when Verizon officially presents its grant at 3:30 p.m. in the Faculty Dining Room of Choate House on the Pleasantville Campus. Entrance 3, 861 Bedford Road. Media admission by press pass.

News conference participants will include Aftab and Nancy Hale, PhD., the Pace professor of information technology who is co-organizing the conference, as well as Constance Knapp, PhD, acting dean of the Seidenberg School, and Catherine Gasteyer, Verizon’s director of government and external affairs for mid-state New York.

More information is available here.

Youth perspectives

The summit will concentrate on students and educators. The Verizon Foundation is providing a $15,000 grant to help bring information and awareness on mobile safety and cyberbullying to high school and college students, and to spread their concerns to adults who can act on them.

The session will help define the issues of mobile safety from students’ perspectives.

Media welcome. Contact Cara Cea, 914-906-9680 if planning to attend.

Groundbreaking concerns

“WiredSafety and I are excited about partnering again with Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems,” said Aftab. “In these areas the Seidenberg students, administration, and professors are among the world’s best. Our last collaboration, the International Cyberbullying Summit in 2008, was the first of its kind. With the growth of mobile devices, technologies and apps, we expect this mobile innovation, safety, and best practices event will be just as groundbreaking.”

“Verizon has a long-standing commitment to internet safety,” said Gasteyer. “We serve millions of broadband customers through our wireless and wired networks. As such, we are committed to protecting children and young people online, and making sure the Internet is safe, educational, and fun for them. This grant is a good fit for Verizon, and we are proud to work with Pace University for a second time to empower educators, parents, and children on this front.”

“We are grateful to the Verizon Foundation for this grant that will let us offer a vital community resource and formulate a best practice model for keeping young people safe,” Hale said.

About Pace and the Seidenberg School

Inherent in The Seidenberg School’s activities and services to students, businesses, and the community is the belief that information technologies are tools for the empowerment of people. Established in 1983, Seidenberg is the youngest school within Pace University. Its mission is to prepare men and women for professional work, research, and lifelong participation in a new and dynamic information age. The school offers a student-oriented environment; small classes; committed teaching; research with professors; innovative programs, projects, and partnerships; and convenient multi-campus locations in New York City and Westchester County as well as online courses and programs.

About Wired Safety

WiredSafety.org is the world’s oldest digital safety group, providing education, information, and one-to-one help for consumers. Its StopCyberbullying.org website is the most popular cyberbullying prevention website in the world and helps inform young people, parents, community organizations, educators, the industry, policymakers, and law enforcement about the issue affecting more than two thirds of US teens. WiredSafety.org is one of five members of Facebook’s International Safety Advisory Board, is a member of the advisory board for MTV’s cyberharassment initiative, AThinLine.org, and created the Girl Scouts of the USA’s cybersafety program, lmk.girlscouts.org. WiredSafety’s executive director, Parry Aftab, is a digital privacy and security lawyer and author, and the recipient of the latest FBI Director’s Community Leadership Award, which will be presented in March 2011.

Contacts:
Parry Aftab, WiredSafety, 201-463-8663, parry@aftab.com
Chris Cory, Pace media relations, 212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

Andrea Spencer of Bank Street College to Lead Pace University’s School of Education as New Dean

Theory-based educator, mobile learning innovator, entrepreneur, and special education advocate who successfully obtained more than $4 million in federal grants over a four-year period.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Cea, Manager of Public Information, Pace University
914.906.9680, ccea@pace.edu

Andrea Spencer of Bank Street College to Lead Pace University’s School of Education as New Dean

Theory-based educator, mobile learning innovator, entrepreneur, and special education advocate who successfully obtained more than $4 million in federal grants over a four-year period

NEW YORK, NY, June 24, 2010 – Andrea (Penny) M. Spencer, Ph.D., associate dean for Academic Affairs at Bank Street College in New York City, has been named dean of Pace University’s School of Education, effective July 1, announced Stephen J. Friedman, president of Pace University.

She succeeds Harriet R. Feldman, Ph.D., who has served as interim dean for the School of Education since 2006 and continues as dean of Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing.

“Penny’s experience at administrative levels in a regional public education agency, as well as departmental and division levels at Bank Street College, make her an ideal match for our mission and vision,” said Pace President Stephen J. Friedman.

Since joining Bank Street College in 2004, Spencer has worked with students in their supervised fieldwork placements, taught online and traditional special education courses, and provided professional development to general education and special education teachers in elementary and middle schools in New York City.  She also collaborated within the College to develop a successful proposal that brought in more than $4 million in federal grants over a four-year period.

One reason Spencer was attracted to Pace was the University’s dedication to preparing the teachers of tomorrow through Pace High School in Chinatown, which functions as a laboratory for the University’s education school. Another was Pace’s pioneering work in the field of autism education.

A champion for students from underserved groups, Spencer has led a seven-year advocacy and research effort related to truancy and the need to hold public education accountable for the success of every child.  “My own research, having compiled more than 300 case reviews, suggests that teachers must be prepared to recognize and respond effectively and efficiently to support children struggling academically and emotionally from the very first day of school,” she said.

Verizon Thinkfinity grants awarded to a number of School of Education faculty members who support research on the use of videos and web 2.0 technologies in the classroom was another appealing aspect to Spencer. “The 21st century world of education demands the ability for educators and their students to actively seek new and innovative ways to share information,” said Spencer. “In addition to initiating creative, interactive online experiences for graduate students at Bank Street, I’ve explored technology innovation through the literature and in support of faculty transitioning to online formats.”

“Professor Spencer’s research is hands-on and her scholarship tends to question the conventional educational wisdom.  Her careful analysis of early grade attendance patterns to predict truancy and disengagement in middle school, for example, was path breaking. She suggested that early grade absenteeism responds to socioemotional support and questioned the imposition of no social promotion as a response to absenteeism and poor school performance among elementary school students. She will be a forceful voice in her new role at Pace,” said Harold O. Levy, Pace University trustee and former New York City Schools chancellor.

Additional career highlights. In 2004 Spencer was appointed chair, Department of Special Education, Bilingual & Dual Language, Infant and Family Development and Early Intervention, Child Life.  In 2006, she became associate dean for Academic Affairs. Prior to Bank Street, Spencer was director of Quality Assurance, Program Development & Student Services for the Capital Region Education Council in Hartford, Conn. (1991-2001), where she doubled the size of her division in five years from $12 million to $26 million via program and resource development.  As principal of The Institute of Living in Hartford (1985-1990), Spencer supervised inpatient and day treatment educational programs for children (K-12) with serious emotional disorders and mental illness. From 1966-1985, she was a teacher, administrator, and consultant for school districts, universities, and private not-for profit organizations in Maine, Massachusetts, and Connecticut.

Spencer earned a MED in Special Education from the University of Maine and a PhD in Special Education from the University of Connecticut.  As a founding partner of Synchrony Solutions, Williston Park, N.Y. (1996 to present), she serves as an educational consultant to the Center for Children’s Advocacy in Hartford, Conn., where a group of attorneys affiliated with the University of Connecticut Law School focus on educational needs and characteristics of elementary, middle, and high school children with learning and behavior problems with special focus on issues of truancy.

For more than 40 years, Pace University’s School of Education has prepared students to not only meet the requirements for teaching certification, but also be agents of change committed to student success and lifelong learning. Through small classes and opportunities for student teaching, School of Education graduates are ready to start making a difference in the world before they even graduate. Innovative programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels prepare classroom teachers, school specialists, and educational leaders. Our programs for classroom teachers prepare teacher candidates to work with children from grades 1 through 12.  We offer programs that prepare individuals to be curriculum leaders in the areas of special education, literacy, and technology, as well as programs that prepare educators for leadership roles in school administration and supervision.

About Pace University: For more than 100 years, Pace University has been preparing students to become leaders in their fields. A private university, Pace provides an education that combines exceptional academics with professional experience and the New York advantage. Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and enrolls almost 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.  www.pace.edu

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Urban School Reform to be Theme of Eighth Annual Educators’ Lecture Series at Pace

Some of the nation’s most challenging advocates of urban school reform will present at Pace University’s School of Education’s 8th annual distinguished educators’ lecture series “Beyond Closing the Achievement Gap: The Next Level of Urban School Reform.”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Cara Cea, Pace University, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

Arthur Maloney, EdD, Pace School of Education, 212-346-1347, amaloney@pace.edu

Note: Photos are available of most participants on request

TOUGH ISSUES IN URBAN SCHOOLS TO BE DISCUSSED BY NATIONAL REFORMERS IN 2010 EDITION OF POPULAR AFTER-SCHOOL LECTURE SERIES AT PACE

Bill Ayers, University of Illinois distinguished professor who became issue in Obama campaign, to give final talk.

“Beyond Closing the Achievement Gap: The Next Level of Urban School Reform” to be theme of well-attended public sessions held after school near City Hall.

NEW YORK, NY – Some of the nation’s most challenging advocates of urban school reform will present at Pace University’s School of Education’s 8th annual distinguished educators’ lecture series “Beyond Closing the Achievement Gap: The Next Level of Urban School Reform.”

The schedule is as follows:

March 10 – Theresa Perry, a national expert in social identities and African American achievement;

March 17 – George Wood, instrumental in the opening of 80 new small high schools in urban Ohio;

March 24 – Tony Wagner, Tony Wagner, Harvard educator who discusses a global achievement gap between teaching and job needs;

April 21 – Bill Ayers, a proponent for teaching for social justice.

Ayers, whose name became national news because of his work with Barak Obama on educational issues in Chicago, was a co-founder of the Weather Underground during the Vietnam war era.

Full houses

The lectures are presented from 6-8 pm after the school day to accommodate educators; the series regularly fills Pace’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts in downtown Manhattan. The center is east of City Hall, entrance on Spruce Street between Gold and Park Row. The lectures are free and open to the public. Media admission by press pass.

Due to the series’ popularity, those outside the city can view the sessions through streaming live video at the Dutchess County Board of Cooperative Educational Services at 5 BOCES Road in Poughkeepsie, 845-486-4800.

Over the years the series has drawn virtually every eminent U.S. voice for improvement in elementary and secondary schools.

More information on the series is available at http://www.pace.edu/page.cfm?doc_id=8403 or from professor Arthur Maloney at (212) 346-1512 or amaloney@pace.edu.

The complete lineup of topics:

March 10

Theresa Perry, Ph.D.

Simmons College

“Towards a New Conversation about the Achievement and Development of African American Youth”

At the heart of Perry’s theory is the centuries-old belief among African Americans that education means liberation. She will argue that misunderstanding, misuse of resources, and misplaced sentiments are challenges in African American achievement. Perry is a Professor of Africana Studies and Education at Simmons College and director of The Race, Education and Democracy Lecture and Book Series, a collaborative effort of Simmons College and Beacon Press. Perry received her master’s degree in theology from Marquette and her doctorate in education from Harvard University.

March 17

George Wood, Ph.D.

Forum for Education and Democracy

“From a Culture of Testing to a Community of Learning”

Wood is Executive Director of The Forum for Education and Democracy and principal of Federal Hocking High School in Stewart, Ohio. Wood writes an education blog for the Forum at http://forumforeducation.org/blogs/george-wood. Referring to the “5,000 hours” that students spend in high school, he says on the blog that “America has an obligation to every child that this time is challenging, engaging, and enriching” and that the “most fundamental purpose of public education is to prepare our children to take their place as citizens in our democracy.” Federal Hocking is a rural school in Appalachian Ohio which has been recognized as a Coalition of Essential Schools Mentor School, a First Amendment School, and as one of America’s 100 Best by Readers’ Digest. Wood also directed the Ohio High School Transformation Initiative’s Small School Leadership Institute that opened 80 new small high schools were opened in the urban areas of Ohio. Wood has authored several books including Time To Learn, Schools that Work, and Many Children Left Behind (with Deborah Meier).

March 24

Tony Wagner, Ed.D.

Harvard Graduate School of Education

“The Global Achievement Gap”

In a Q&A on the Harvard Graduate School of Education web site, Wagner discusses his most recent book, “The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don’t Teach The New Survival Skills Our Children Need–and What We Can Do About It,” in which he defines the concept in the title as “the gap between what we are teaching and testing in our schools, even in the ones that are most highly-regarded, versus the skills all students will need for careers, college, and citizenship in the 21st century.” In the book Wagner argues that the gap should be grabbed by business leaders to guide a much-needed conversation with educators. Wagner is co-director of the Change Leadership Group (CLG) at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and is a faculty member of the Executive Leadership Program for Educators at the school. He has been senior advisor to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation for the past eight years, first executive director of Educators for Social Responsibility; project director for the Public Agenda Foundation in New York; and President and CEO of the Institute for Responsive Education. He earned his Master’s in teaching and doctorate in education at Harvard.

April 21

William Charles “Bill” Ayers, Ph.D.

University of Illinois at Chicago College of Education

“Problems and Possibilities for Democratic School Reform”

Ayers is an American elementary education theorist focused on education reform, curriculum, and instruction. He is a Distinguished Professor of Education and Senior University Scholar in the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has authored several books on education, including “The Good Preschool Teacher: Six Teachers Reflect on Their Lives” (1989), “To Teach: The Journey of a Teacher” (1993), and “Teaching for Social Justice: A Democracy and Education Reader” (1998). Ayers earned his bachelor’s degree in American studies from The University of Michigan and his doctorate in curriculum and teaching from Bank Street College of Education.

About Pace University

For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, Pace enrolls nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

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