SpryLiving: “A New You for the New Year”

It’s January. Time to ring in the New Year. And you have, without a doubt, made a ton of resolutions that for once you vow to finally keep. Know that you have the power to thrive, succeed, and become the individual you desire in 2012—without ever having to totally give up Moon Pies. Pace’s Richard Shadick and John Cronin offer advice in Spry Living’s January issue, reaching 9.5 million readers, on how to make your New Year Better Than Before.

“Yes, we all want to lose weight, eat more vegetables, get fit, drink water instead of white wine, hold fewer grudges, manage our stress, sleep better and help the planet go greener,” writes Jane Wilkens Michael in the January issue of Spry Living

But alas for many of us, our best goals and intentions are forgotten faster than old acquaintenances.  Here are tips that Michael garnered from Pace faculty members John Cronin and Richard Shadick on how to make our resolutions live on after January 1:

Emotional Health

Be realistic—and specific. “Instead of telling yourself, I am going to lose weight and be healthy next year, it is better to say, I will lose five pounds by February 15 by walking for 20 minutes three days a week and no longer drinking soda,” says Dr. Richard Shadick, director of the Counseling Center and adjunct associate professor of psychology at Pace University. The more specific, measurable, and attainable a goal is, the more likely it can be reached.

Giving back

It’s easy being green. “This New Year, resolve to help the planet,” says John Cronin, senior fellow for Environmental Affairs at Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies. “There are two questions I am asked most often: ‘Can one person really make a difference?’ and ‘How?’ The answer to the first is easy: Yes! It is the story of human history — but those who never try to make a difference never do.” Cronin poses a creative challenge: “Look to your own life to find that something special you can make happen. For example, one mechanic adds a dollar to the bill of each of his car repair customers as a donation to the Riverkeeper organization. Over the past 20 years he has directed thousands of dollars to the group, and his customers are delighted. Help your child’s school find environmental experts to speak to classes. Here’s a simple one: Share a fascinating fact, and your friends will spread the information too —how much of the water on our planet is available for drinking? (Answer: Less than 1%). I promise they will be amazed, educated and eager to tell someone else. The point is that in addition to the how-to’s of proper individual behavior, which after 42 Earth Days should be common knowledge by now, there are creative acts you can perform, invent and organize that will change the world right in your own backyard if you are bold enough to try.  Jump right in. The planet is waiting.”

The Journal News: “Ex-Riverkeeper John Cronin receives Jefferson Award”

Former Riverkeeper John Cronin joined a select group this week that included U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and actress Marlo Thomas.

They all received what has been dubbed the “Nobel Prize” for public service — the Jefferson Award.

John Cronin, 60, has worked on environmental issues facing the Hudson River for nearly four decades and was one of 18 people honored with  The Jefferson Award in a ceremony in Washington, DC, Tuesday night.

“It was quite a surprise,” Cronin said Friday to The Journal News. “Some of the awards are known ahead of time, others are kept under wraps. I was just going there to represent Pace University. I still haven’t figured out who knew and who didn’t.”

“The big theme of the two days was that everyday people can change the world,” Cronin said. “It reminded me what a special place the Hudson River Valley is, that we started an environmental movement before there was an Earth Day, when environmentalism wasn’t very popular at all.”

Representing Pace, Cronin was given a Champion award, presented to two “exceptional individuals whose volunteer work reflects the deep and abiding commitment of their employers to making a different in the communities where their employees live and work.”

The award cited his work as an environmental advocate for nearly four decades, serving “on the front lines of water-quality issues as a legislative aide, riverkeeper, and as the co-founder of the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic, a nationally acclaimed training program for law students and educators.”

Cronin is director and CEO of Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries, and a Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs, Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies at Pace University.

Pleasantville-Briarcliff Patch.com: Environmental Center Featured in “The Role of the Raptors”

Pleasantville Patch.com featured Jim Eyring’s birds of prey demonstration, part of the annual Earth Month line-up. (Left: Eyring and a raptor).

Master Falconer Jim Eyring captivated a large crowd with a display of live birds of prey at the Pace University Environmental Center—where he serves as assistant director—on Tuesday evening.

In addition to providing a thrilling demonstration, Eyring spoke about the function of the center and it’s newly-dedicated museum.

Read the full article and browse photos of Pace’s birds of prey here:

The Role of the Raptors – Pleasantville-Briarcliff Manor, NY Patch.

Katherine Kennedy to Present Attorney General’s Battle Against Global Warming at Law School April 14

Katherine Kennedy, Attorney General Cuomo’s Special Deputy Attorney General for Environmental Protection, will address students and faculty at Pace Law School, one of the nation’s top three centers for environmental law, to raise environmental awareness for Earth Day 2008.

News from Attorney General Andrew Cuomo

Department of Law Department of Law
120 Broadway The State Capitol
New York, NY 10271 Albany, NY 12224

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Albany Press Office / 518-473-5525
New York City Press Office / 212-416-8060

Pace Press Office (Cara Halstead Cea) 914-773-3312, cell 914-906-9680 chalstead@pace.edu

ATTORNEY GENERAL ANDREW CUOMO’S OFFICE TO PRESENT
THE LEGAL BATTLE AGAINST GLOBAL WARMING
AT PACE LAW SCHOOL

School Nationally Known for Environmental Law Participates in Cuomo’s Statewide Initiative to Raise Environmental Awareness for Earth Day 2008

Date and Time: Monday, April 14, 5:00 p.m.

This event will be open to the press.

The event will be held at:
New York State Judicial Institute Lecture Hall

Pace University School of Law
78 North Broadway
White Plains, NY 10603

Katherine Kennedy, Attorney General Cuomo’s Special Deputy Attorney General for Environmental Protection, will address students and faculty at Pace Law School, one of the nation’s top three centers for environmental law, to raise environmental awareness for Earth Day 2008.

Kennedy, who serves as the Chief of the Environmental Protection Bureau, will outline challenges ahead and discuss actions the Attorney General’s office has taken to preserve and protect the natural environment for all New Yorkers. She will put a specific focus on New York State’s leadership in the legal fight against global warming.

Environmental protection has been a priority of Attorney General Cuomo’s administration. Among other initiatives, his office has led efforts to fight global warming, protect the Great Lakes and other waterbodies, reduce smog and other forms of air pollution, and safeguard our communities against toxic contamination.

OPEN TO PRESS

N.Y. Governor George Pataki Credits Pace University Students During Earth Day Address

New York Governor George E. Pataki today credited Pace University students with assisting in his newest initiative to clean up the Hudson River. During an Earth Day address on the Beacon, N.Y., waterfront, Pataki announced that New York will ask the federal government to designate a section of the Hudson River a “no discharge” zone. Pace students’ research demonstrated that a 153-mile stretch of the river would likely qualify for the Environmental Protection Agency designation. The “no discharge” designation, based on the number of adequate pump out facilities, would prohibit boats from dumping sewage in the Hudson River.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637

Pace University Political Science Class Drafts Proposed Environmental Bill,
Lobbies Albany to Protect Hudson River

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y., April 22, 1999 — New York Governor George E. Pataki today credited Pace University students with assisting in his newest initiative to clean up the Hudson River. During an Earth Day address on the Beacon, N.Y., waterfront, Pataki announced that New York will ask the federal government to designate a section of the Hudson River a “no discharge” zone. Pace students’ research demonstrated that a 153-mile stretch of the river would likely qualify for the Environmental Protection Agency designation. The “no discharge” designation, based on the number of adequate pump out facilities, would prohibit boats from dumping sewage in the Hudson River.

The students also worked with Assemblyman Richard Brodsky resulting in a bill (Assembly 958a) that would require the State Department of Environmental Conservation to maintain the number of pump out facilities required by the EPA. The New York State Assembly Environmental Conservation Committee passed the bill unanimously this week. The student-inspired bill, “Hudson River Marine Sanitation Act,” was amended from a statewide initiative proposed and defeated for at least the past 20 years.

So, for all those cynics who believe that Generation Xers are apathetic to social causes – meet the students in Professor Greg Julian’s and John Cronin’s political science class at Pace University. These “20-somethings” conducted extensive research, amended an environmental bill and lobbied state senators and local assembly members in an effort to prevent boats from dumping sewage into the Hudson River.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for students to learn about public policy in a democracy by practicing citizen advocacy,” Julian said.

“Issues in Public Policy: The Hudson River,” is co-taught with Hudson Riverkeeper John Cronin, an Environmental Studies Lecturer in Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences. The class introduced students first hand to the political process: their efforts included face-to-face lobbying of state senators and assembly members in Albany; providing every marina along the Hudson River with a grant application for proposed funding toward pumpout facilities; and constructing a class Website to highlight the students’ activities: http://webpage.pace.edu/pol222

During the semester, the class sponsored a series of guest lectures to learn how to advocate for the environment and actively collaborate to write legislation. The series featured five of New York State’s leading advocates, including John Cahill, commissioner of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Chris Meyer, director of New York Public Interest Research Group, Pete Seeger, musician, songwriter, and founder of Clearwater movement, Richard Brodsky, chair of the New York State Assembly Environmental Conservation Commission, Judith Kimerling, renowned author, professor and environmental lawyer, and Robert F. Kennedy Jr., an environmental litigator and Pace University law professor.

Judith Kimerling to Discuss Oil Development in the Amazon Rainforest at Pace University, April 22, Earth Day Celebration

Oil development in the Amazon Rainforest, its impact on indigenous people and its destruction of the environment are among the topics to be discussed by renowned author, professor and environmental lawyer, Judith Kimerling. She will also give a slide presentation to complement her lecture.
This event will be held on Thursday, April 22, “Earth Day,” 6:30 to 8:00 p.m., at the Pace University Kessel Campus Center. To register or for more information, call (914) 773-3789.

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y.-Oil development in the Amazon Rainforest, its impact on
indigenous people and its destruction of the environment are among the topics
to be discussed by renowned author, professor and environmental lawyer, Judith
Kimerling. She will also give a slide presentation to complement her lecture.
This event will be held on Thursday, April 22, “Earth Day,” 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.,
at the Pace University Kessel Campus Center. To register or for more
information, call (914) 773-3789.

Kimerling is an internationally-recognized expert on the environmental and
social impact of oil development in tropical forests, and a leader in efforts
to protect the world’s remaining rainforests, and the indigenous peoples who
inhabit them, from irresponsible oil field practices. She is the author of
Amazon Crude.

The event is sponsored by N.A.T.U.R.E. The Pace Environmental Club, The Pace
University Environmental Center, and The Pace Student Government Association.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City
and Westchester County. Nearly 13,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate,
graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and
Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information
Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and
the World Trade Institute.