NEWS RELEASE: Pace Advocate of ‘Parallel Justice’ for Crime Victims Appointed to New NY State Commission on Sentencing

A Pace University professor of criminal justice, Susan Herman, an advocate of “parallel” justice for crime victims, has been named to the state’s first-ever Permanent Sentencing Commission, which is charged with a thoroughgoing reform.

Susan Herman, lawyer and professor of criminal justice, is one of two academics chosen to help reform “convoluted” policies

Note: Herman is a resident of Fulton Landing in Brooklyn. She can be reached for interviews at Sherman2@pace.edu or her cell phone, number available on request. See contact below.

Photo available.

NEW YORK, NY, October 15, 2010 — Crime sentencing policies in New York State have not been comprehensively revised in more than four decades. They have been described as “convoluted,” and as deficient both in helping offenders reform and helping victims find restitution.

Now a Pace University professor of criminal justice, Susan Herman, an advocate of “parallel” justice for crime victims, has been named to the state’s first-ever Permanent Sentencing Commission, which is charged with a thoroughgoing reform.

Herman is a lawyer and the former executive director of the National Center for Victims of Crime in Washington, DC. A graduate of the Antioch School of Law and a former Special Counsel to the Commissioner of the New York Police Department, she is the author of a book published this summer titled “Parallel Justice for Victims of Crime” (National Center for Victims of Crime).

More than pie in the sky

A review of the book on the website Restorative Justice Online describes the work as “focused and balanced.”

The reviewer, Eric Asur, says the volume addresses “the billions of dollars of restitution that is not collected” and how the current victim compensation funds are “of limited utility, and may only assist victims of violent crimes with specific hardships.” Current compensation funds often are simply “inapplicable” to victims of “financial or identity fraud type crimes.”

The task of developing a new system “seems daunting,” Asur concludes, but he adds that “fortunately, the author presents more than a ‘pie in the sky’ dream,” recounting numerous pilot programs and legislative changes in other states.

New York could well become a leader in this field. Among the Commission’s jobs is increasing New York State’s “focus on crime victims, including efforts to broaden victim participation in sentencing and to facilitate victim restitution,” according to a press release from the state’s Unified Court system.

Distinguished colleagues

Two notable figures in the state’s legal community co-chair the new Commission — New York County’s new District Attorney, Cyrus R. Vance, Jr., and the Administrative Judge of the State Supreme Court’s Criminal Term in Kings County, Barry Kamins, a former criminal defense lawyer. The other member with an academic appointment is Shawn Bushway, PhD, of the State University at Albany.

New York State’s Chief Judge, Jonathan Lippman, announced the makeup of the Commission this week.

The establishment of a permanent commission was recommended by the most recent short-term commission on sentencing reform, chaired by former DCJS Commissioner Denise O’Donnell. The state’s current system was called “convoluted” by a Vice-Chair of the new commission, Patricia Marks, a Supervising Judge for the Criminal Courts of the Seventh Judicial District. The new commission is similar to commissions in many other states.

Herman has taught at Pace for five years in the University’s popular Criminal Justice program, which recently began offering an Executive Masters degree (MA) in Homeland Security. The Criminal Justice Department is part of the University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences.

About Pace University

For 103 years, Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter:  NYC | PLV

Contact: Christopher T. Cory, Pace media relations, 212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

Pace’s Homeland Security Program on FOX Affiliate in Spokane

Pace’s new homeland security Master’s program was mentioned on Fox affiliate KHQ-TV in Spokane, WA in two news segments on September 10, 2010.

Pace’s new homeland security Master’s program was mentioned on Fox affiliate KHQ-TV in Spokane, WA in two news segments on September 10, 2010.

From the segment: “At least one college is offering a new degree, the first of its kind! According to the non-profit Partnership for Public Service, within the next two years nearly a quarter of all federal jobs will be related to homeland security, a field that did not exist before September 11. Despite an economy marked by job loss nearly 2,000 openings in homeland security are listed on the government job web site. However the education system’s ability to produce educated professionals is falling behind with the increasing demand. That’s why Pace University developed a new master’s-level program in homeland security.”

Professor Puts Twilight in Historical Context in New Book

With the announcement of the release date of the latest movie in the Twilight series, set to hit theaters in fall of next year, fans are again setting their sights on one of the hottest film series of our time.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

PROFESSOR PUTS TWILIGHT IN HISTORICAL CONTEXT IN NEW BOOK

Cover image available upon request

NEW YORK, NY, May 14, 2010 – With the announcement of the release date of the latest movie in the Twilight series, set to hit theaters in fall of next year, fans are again setting their sights on one of the hottest film series of our time.

Vampires and their love lives are the newest craze – and before that it was all about wizards. But are these themes and characters really so new?

Not even close, according to Pace University History Professor Nancy Reagin, editor of the recently published “Twilight and History” (Wiley; April 2010; ISBN: 978-0-470-58178-0; $17.95; Paper).

She finds fan culture surrounding these stories – from Muggles to Trek fans to the Twilight-obsessed – fascinating. After working on her third monograph: “Getting A Life: Early Fandoms In Late 19th and 20th Century Europe and America” and other works on the history of various fan communities, publisher Wiley asked her to edit several books on history and pop culture including the Twilight book as well as “Harry Potter and History,” which will be out in 2011.

“I wanted to do something that was a little bit more upbeat,” said Reagin, whose previous research and writing focused on German history, gender and sexuality, nationalism and national identity, and Nazi women in occupied Poland during WWII.

Each chapter of “Twilight and History” explores the history behind a Twilight character and other aspects of the story.

“Authors often take pieces of actual history and use them as building blocks for an imaginary world,” Reagin said. This spring she screened clips from the film “Kingdom of Heaven” during a class on the Second Crusade. “Students are watching these battle scenes and all they can think of is ‘Lord of the Rings,’ and the battle at Helm’s Deep in The Two Towers, since Tolkien uses medieval military technology and tactics.”

The book includes a chapter written by two of Reagin’s former students at Pace, Grace and Laura Loiacono, who are also writing a chapter for the forthcoming “Harry Potter and History.” Spoiler Alert: Their chapter is about Alice, the character who was incarcerated in an insane asylum in 1920s. They researched and wrote about what it was like to be a patient in an asylum during that time period.

“I love the Twilight series and was interested in deeply exploring the various historical aspects of one of my favorite characters, Alice,” said Grace, who graduated in 2007 with a dual major in History and Women’s and Gender Studies and recently completed a Master’s of Library and Information Science from the Pratt Institute.

Her sister Laura graduated from Pace in 2009 with a dual major in English and History and a minor in Women’s Studies. She is currently attending graduate school for English literature and will eventually complete a degree in Education. She hopes to become a teacher.

“I learned how to connect historical fact with one of my favorite young adult fiction series. This project has taught me how to look deeper into a work of fiction where I might otherwise only have skimmed the surface,” Laura said.

With the popularity of these fantasy books and films, there’s clearly a market for these books. “Fans will run through a whole series,” Reagin said. “They see all the movies or read all the books and then wish there was more,” she said. “Fans enjoy diving into characters’ backgrounds.”

Read more about Nancy Reagin on her personal website at http://webpage.pace.edu/nreagin/cv.html.

About Pace University

For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV.

About Wiley

Founded in 1807, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. has been a valued source of information and understanding for more than 200 years, helping people around the world meet their needs and fulfill their aspirations. Wiley and its acquired companies have published the works of more than 400 Nobel laureates in all categories: Literature, Economics, Physiology or Medicine, Physics, Chemistry, and Peace.

Our core businesses publish scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, encyclopedias, books, and online products and services; professional/trade books, subscription products, training materials, and online applications and Web sites; and educational materials for undergraduate and graduate students and lifelong learners. Wiley’s global headquarters are located in Hoboken, New Jersey, with operations in the U.S., Europe, Asia, Canada, and Australia. The Company’s Web site can be accessed at www.wiley.com, with the latest news from Wiley available in our online global press room at www.wiley.com/go/press. The Company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbols JWa and JWb.

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Pace University and Queens College students team up with IRS criminal investigators

Financial crimes meet savvy students as Pace University and Queens College students team up with IRS criminal investigators as “IRS Special Agents for a Day”

September 28, 2006

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu
Admission by press credential.

Financial crimes meet savvy students as Pace University and Queens College students team up with IRS criminal investigators as “IRS Special Agents for a Day”
Friday, October 13

WHAT: A business owner skimming from his company, a bar owner keeping a second set of books, an identity theft scheme, a drug trafficker, a constitutionally challenged “non taxpayer,” and a race track pari-mutuel teller kickback scheme. These are some of the hypothetical noir situations that will be faced by twenty-six students from Pace University and Queens College when they become honorary “IRS Special Agents for a Day” in a unique one-day program organized by the New York Field Office Criminal Investigation Division of the Internal Revenue Service. U.S. Postal Inspectors and uniformed NYPD Officers will assist with program activities.

This is the first time the program is being held in the New York City area.

Students are placed in groups, each with an experienced Special Agent who coaches them and provides learning points along the way. The Honorary Agents then must follow the paper trail. Their day long investigation may start with an anonymous informant, a meeting with local law enforcement, or even some garbage. The accounting students select their next steps in gathering evidence, usually leading them to potential witnesses, played by seasoned Special Agents, CPA’s, and other volunteers. Some of the students will utilize the tools available to federal law enforcement officers, including use of undercover, surveillance, subpoenas, and search and arrest warrants. At the end of their scenarios, the students meet as a group to talk about their investigation and receive an evaluation from their coaches. The payoff, says IRS organizer Joseph J. Foy, is students realize that investigating financial fraud is complex and requires strong accounting, organization and communication skills. They get personal learning experience dealing one-on-one with top-notch, professional IRS criminal investigators. This is where academia meets the real world.

WHO: Joseph J. Foy, Special Agent, IRS Criminal Investigation Division (212-436-1032, joseph.foy@ci.irs.gov) and Susanne O’Callaghan, Associate Professor of Accounting, Pace University’s Lubin School of Business (212-618-6410, socallaghan@pace.edu) are available for interviews about the program.

WHEN: Friday, October 13, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

WHERE: Pace University, One Pace Plaza (across from City Hall), New York, NY.

Pace University appoints Jeff Trexler, J.D., PhD, as Wilson Professor of Social Entrepreneurship

Pace University has appointed Jeff Trexler, J.D., PhD, as the new Helene and Grant Wilson Professor of Social Entrepreneurship. Funded through Pace’s Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship, the professorship is a joint appointment with the University’s Lubin School of Business and Dyson College of Arts and Sciences.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

Pace University appoints Jeff Trexler, J.D., PhD,
as Wilson Professor of Social Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurial lawyer and researcher has expertise in China and Russia, will expand Pace academic programs encouraging risk-taking spirit in nonprofits

New York, NY – September 19, 2006 – Pace University has appointed Jeff Trexler, J.D., PhD, as the new Helene and Grant Wilson Professor of Social Entrepreneurship. Funded through Pace’s Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship, the professorship is a joint appointment with the University’s Lubin School of Business and Dyson College of Arts and Sciences.

“Jeff Trexler is developing an academic program for the Wilson Center that integrates cutting-edge theory with innovative social enterprise,” says Pace President David A. Caputo. “His extensive experience will help us leverage Pace’s performance in nonprofit organization development and education, and create heightened awareness throughout the University of the nonprofit sector in civic life.”

Before joining Pace, Trexler taught nonprofit organization law at Saint Louis University, the SMU School of Law and the Yale Law School.

Emerging nonprofit areas. In his doctoral dissertation, Professor Trexler examined the link between nonprofit management and organizational identity in higher education, with a particular focus on educational missions to China. His recent writing and research cover topics in the area of social enterprise including Russian nonprofit law, Native American tribal philanthropy, the rhetoric of nonprofit design and the nature of nonprofit networks.

In addition to his academic research and teaching, Professor Trexler has worked with U.S. and foreign nongovernmental organizations to develop more effective nonprofit institutions. In the 1990s, he helped Russian lawyers and government officials establish a new legal framework for civil society in the post-Soviet era. As a practicing lawyer specializing in tax-exempt organizations, he has assisted groups covering a spectrum of nonprofit activity including venture philanthropy, grassroots education, health care, religion and mutual aid.

Pace University established the Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship in 2005 to help cultivate the risk-taking spirit and managerial skills of nonprofit organizations. The center was launched with a gift of $5 million from Helene and Grant Wilson, whose involvement with nonprofits convinced them that more entrepreneurial management can help these organizations increase their impact. With Executive Director Rob Johnston and Pace faculty members, the Wilson Center (www.pace.edu/wilsoncenter) provides scholarly research, short training courses, and advisory services to nonprofit organizations, in addition to contributing new nonprofit courses to the University’s current entrepreneurship offerings.

Celebrating its centennial in 2006, Pace University is known for an outcome-oriented environment that prepares students to succeed in a wide-range of professions. Pace has facilities in downtown and midtown New York City and in Westchester County at Pleasantville, Briarcliff, and White Plains (a graduate center and law school). A private metropolitan university, Pace enrolls approximately 14,000 students in undergraduate, masters, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Ivan G. Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, Law School, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, and School of Education. www.pace.edu.

Unique Environmental Course: River Serves as Classroom and Lab for Professor from 22 Institutions

A literal boatload of environmentally-minded professors from 22 colleges, universities, and institutes will spend three weeks roughing it on the Hudson River and in an Adirondack field camp this summer. They will be doing scientific projects like taking water samples, but also will undertake literary analyses of famous writings about the river and will contemplate 19th century paintings by Hudson River School artists. Some will learn to find their way in the woods with GPS navigation satellites.

Contacts:
Rosemary Mercedes, Manager of Public Information, Pace University
212-346-1637, cell 914-424-3845, rmercedes@pace.edu
Michelle Land, Program Coordinator, Pace Academy for the Environment
914-773-3738 or mland@pace.edu

Note: Media will have access to the R/V Seawolf at various points on the Hudson River between July 7 and July 29. Media are also invited to meet faculty as they teach on land along the way. A schedule is available. Contact 212-346-1637 for more information.

BY BOAT AND ON FOOT, PROFESSORS FROM 22 CAMPUSES
TO TRY OUT UNIQUE COLLEGE COURSE
USING RIVER AS CLASSROOM AND LAB

Nation’s “first group of colleges and universities to organize around concerted environmental agenda”

Pleasantville, NY, June 28, 2005 — A literal boatload of environmentally-minded professors from 22 colleges, universities, and institutes will spend three weeks roughing it on the Hudson River and in an Adirondack field camp this summer. They will be doing scientific projects like taking water samples, but also will undertake literary analyses of famous writings about the river and will contemplate 19th century paintings by Hudson River School artists. Some will learn to find their way in the woods with GPS navigation satellites.

Their ambition is to personally pilot test, learn how to teach and eventually share with professors elsewhere a pioneering, multidisciplinary college-level curriculum that will help the next generation of students deal with the next generation of environmental issues.

The project is the first venture of what one expert calls “the first group of colleges and universities in the country to organize around a concerted environmental agenda.” The professor-tested course will be offered to 30 students from member institutions next summer.

Summer on the River. Thirty-six faculty members from 14 Consortium-member institutions will pilot the “River Summer” program from July 6 – 30. They will embark from Kingston on the R/V Seawolf, a research vessel operated by the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and use a field camp at the Huntington Forest Research Center near Blue Mountain Lake in the Adirondacks.

The course curriculum will integrate history, law and the arts with natural and social science. Traveling and living together surrounded by the river’s landscape, ecosystem and culture, the faculty members will progress through modules covering the Adirondacks, the Upper, Mid and Lower Hudson, and New York Harbor. Their work also will focus on course development and interdisciplinary, multi institutional instruction.

A recent Pace Poll on the Environment underscored the need for a new approach to environmental education.

The professors will both take and teach courses including Riverscope Instrumentation for Near-Real Time Data Collection, The New Political Economy of the Hudson River Valley, GPS and Orienteering Exercises, Acoustic Survey in the Harbor, and Writing the Hudson.

River Summer 2006 will culminate with students writing a formal report to New York Governor George Pataki which will be submitted to a regional publication.

Multi-campus Coalition. Formed over the last 12 months under the leadership of the Pace Academy for the Environment (PAE), the new Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities (ECHVCU) consists of 36 institutions up and down the Hudson that have coalesced for teaching, research and advocacy projects they could not do separately.

The PAE is directed by John Cronin, who was the nation’s first Riverkeeper (on the Hudson) and is a Scholar in Residence at Pace University. Michelle Land, Program Coordinator of PAE, was appointed director of the Consortium in 2004. The PAE is playing a key organizational role in the Consortium and has collaborated closely with Stephanie Pfirman, Chair of the Barnard College Department of Environmental Science, and Tim Kenna, of Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, on the development of River Summer.

River Summer 2005 is supported in part by a $76,000 grant to Barnard College from the Teagle Foundation and in part by the Rivers and Estuaries Center in Beacon, NY.

“This is the first group of colleges and universities in the country to organize around a concerted environmental agenda,” according to William Focht, a national authority on environmental education who is a professor of political science at Oklahoma State University. “It is a model for the rest of the nation.”

Focht is co-chair of the nation’s most significant national body on teaching environmental studies, the Curriculum Committee of the Council of Environmental Deans and Directors, which is associated with the Washington-based National Council for Science and the Environment.

Consortium Membership. The Consortium’s members include institutions upstate like RPI in Troy, those near the harbor like Columbia and Pace, eight units of the State University of New York, small private colleges like Vassar and religious schools like Fordham. (www.environmentalconsortium.org)

The current members are Bard College, Barnard College, Columbia University, CUNY – Queens College, Dominican College, Fordham University, Iona College, Manhattan College, Manhattanville College, Marist College, Marymount College of Fordham University, Mercy College, Mount Saint Mary College, College of Mount Saint Vincent, The College of New Rochelle, Pace University, Polytechnic University, Ramapo College of New Jersey, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, The Sage Colleges, The College of Saint Rose, Saint Thomas Aquinas College, Sarah Lawrence College, Siena College, SUNY – Columbia-Greene Community College, SUNY – Dutchess Community College, SUNY – New Paltz, SUNY – Orange County Community College, SUNY – Purchase College, SUNY – Rockland Community College, SUNY – Stony Brook, SUNY – Ulster County Community College, SUNY – University at Albany, SUNY – Westchester Community College, Union College and Vassar College.

A private university in the New York Metropolitan area, Pace has a growing national reputation for offering students opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. It is one of the ten founders of Project Pericles, developing education that encourages lifelong participation in democratic processes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. Approximately 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu.

New American Irish Studies Institute

Expanding on its 100 year commitment to its Latin motto of Opportunitas, Pace University announced today the establishment of an Institute for American Irish Studies. Christopher Cahill, the long-time editor in chief of The Recorder, the journal of the American Irish Historical Society, will serve as the Institute’s Executive Director.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact
Rosemary Mercedes, Manager of Public Information, Pace University
212-346-1637, Cell: 914-424-3845, rmercedes@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY TO LAUNCH NEW INSTITUTE
FOR AMERICAN IRISH STUDIES

University Hopes to Develop Immigration and Migration Studies

Advisors include Edward Conlon, Karen Duffy, Brian O’Dwyer

New York, NY, May 23, 2005 – Expanding on its 100 year commitment to its Latin motto of Opportunitas, Pace University announced today the establishment of an Institute for American Irish Studies. Christopher Cahill, the long-time editor in chief of The Recorder, the journal of the American Irish Historical Society, will serve as the Institute’s Executive Director.

By highlighting the rich history, complex integration and diverse cultural exchanges of the Irish in America, the University intends the Institute to be a first step in creating a broader move towards migration and immigration studies.

The Institute’s advisory board includes such American Irish luminaries as authors Edward Conlon and Thomas Kelly, actress Karen Duffy, lawyer and community leader Brian O’Dwyer, and others drawn from the worlds of finance, government, labor, academia, and the arts.

“I am enthusiastic about this,” said David A. Caputo, Pace University President. “Pace students and faculty members embody the riches and welcome the challenges of migration and immigration patterns in the US and the world, and deepening our interest in these areas will be stimulating for all of us.”

“Pace’s integral involvement in New York City and Westchester County life makes it the ideal place for establishing the Institute for American Irish Studies” said Cahill. “Pace’s exciting scholarly resources will advance the work of the Institute as well as collaborative work in other fields.”

The Institute will be headquartered on Pace’s Midtown Campus in the art deco Fred F. French Building on 5th Avenue, and will work closely with the Provost, faculty members and students on Pace campuses in downtown New York and Westchester County.

Pace currently offers courses in various areas addressing immigration and migratory issues, including American Diversity: Immigration, Ethnicity and Race, Global Culture and Local Identities, and Ethnic and Racial Minorities. The new American Irish Studies Institute will serve as one prototype for expanded multidisciplinary learning.

“Celtic Tiger” and Avant-Garde. The Pace Institute for American Irish Studies has a three pronged goal, Cahill said:

• To enrich and enliven the cultural and community exchanges between American Irish and Americans of other cultural or ethnic backgrounds, within the United States and Ireland;

• To document the ongoing experience, achievements and activities of American Irish from all walks of life within this country;

• To broaden and deepen awareness about the important role American Irish have played and continue to play in the history of the United States, in government, business, labor, law enforcement, sports, entertainment, and the arts and humanities.

Unlike Irish studies institutes elsewhere in higher education, the Institute will not focus primarily on Ireland, but on the Irish in America.

Proposed conferences and symposia will explore American Irish influence on the economic boom over the last fifteen years that has made Ireland the “Celtic Tiger”; bring together national labor leaders to discuss the role of American Irish in the rise of the US Labor movement; probe the conflicted relationship of the American Irish to the history of slavery; and examine Irish figures central to the American avant-garde in literature, music and visual arts who are less commonly associated with Irish America.

St. Patrick’s Day Narrator. An author, historian and editor, Christopher Cahill has co-hosted the annual New York City Saint Patrick’s Day Parade for WNBC-TV for the past five years, providing live on-air historical and literary comment. He was founding executive director and advisory board member of the Irish American Studies Institute of the City University of New York. He currently serves as Editor in Chief of “The Recorder”, a publication of the American Irish Historical Society headquartered in New York, where he is also historiographer and a member of the executive council.

He has edited several books, most recently “There You Are: Writings on Irish and American Literature and History” by Thomas Flanagan (2004), and “Gather Round Me: The Best of Irish Popular Poetry” (2004). He also contributed to “The Dictionary of Irish National Biography,” forthcoming in 2006. Cahill has published fiction, poetry, and literary criticism in a wide range of national and international magazines, served as visiting professor for Irish Studies at New York University; and instructor at Stanford University’s Department of English and Literature. He earned an MA from Stanford University and a BA, summa cum laude, from the University of Virginia, where he studied English Literature and History as an Echols Scholar.

A private university in the New York Metropolitan area, Pace has a growing national reputation for offering students opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. Approximately 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu