The Pleasantville Examiner: Fracking Debate Highlighted at Pace University Forums | The Examiner News

The Pleasantville Examiner ran a feature story covering two related Earth Month events at Pace. Both events explored a controversial environmental issue – hydro-fracking. The first event, entitled WTF? (What the Frac?), was a neutral debate with energy experts. The second event was a session with community groups decidedly against fracking.

The Pleasantville Examiner ran a feature story covering two related Earth Month events at Pace. Both events explored a controversial environmental issue – hydro-fracking. The first event, entitled WTF? (What the Frac?) organized by the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, was a neutral debate with energy experts. The second event, organized by Dyson professor Fran Delahanty, was a session with community groups decidedly against fracking.

From The Pleasantville Examiner:

The hot-button issue of vertical hydraulic fracturing to extract natural gas in the upstate Marcellus Shale may be stalled in moratorium, but that didn’t stop Pace University from hosting two separate forums on the issue last week.

On April 9, energy and environmental leaders gathered at the Pleasantville and New York City campuses and were linked by video conference to address issues such as the science, economics, regulations, ethics and environmental consequences of the practice.

The following afternoon, fracking opponents listened to a panel of three experts at Pace’s Kessel Student Center in Pleasantville who explored strategies to accelerate the development of alternative energy and to ban fracking. That event was organized by the Pleasantville-based WESPAC Foundation.

The panelists addressed the health and economic impacts of fracking and expressed concern that if the energy industry is allowed to drill upstate it could delay efforts to encourage development of alternative sources.

“Energy independence does not mean substituting Middle East oil for hydro-fracking for natural gas,” said NYU Clinical Associate Professor of Social Sciences Dr. Lisa DiCaprio, one of Tuesday’s three panelists. “It means looking at alternatives to all fossil fuels.”

Panelist Ellen Weininger, education outreach coordinator for Grassroots Environmental Education,  a non-profit organization that reaches out to citizens about the impacts of environmental exposures, said “public health is the single most important issue” and is the reason why fracking should be banned in New York State.

In Pennsylvania, there have been reports that the drilling contaminated wells and deteriorated air quality caused by the sharp increase in truck traffic. Similar problems could happen in upstate communities, Weininger said.

Ecomonist Dr. Jannette Barth said the energy industry has also misled the public about the economic benefits. She said only about 3.7 jobs are created for every $1 million invested by natural gas companies who engage in fracking as opposed to 9.5 and 9.8 jobs, respectively, for wind and solar.

However, Andrew Revkin, the panel moderator on Monday night in Manhattan and who writes The New York Times DotEarth blog, said the biggest challenge in the fracking debate is getting accurate information to the public. He said so far the issue has been debated by interests “on the fringes,” which ignores valid points on both sides.

Revkin said fracking opponents have wrongly stated that the industry is inherently dangerous and can’t be regulated while some natural gas companies have hurt themselves by taking shortcuts and failing to address all safety issues. He maintained, however, that fracking does not have to imperil the environment.

“There’s a clear path ahead on this,” Revkin said. “There’s a way to regulate this.”

Mark Boling, president of V+ Development Solutions at Southwest Energy, said at the Monday forum that it has been difficult in devising effective regulations in the current environment. With air  emissions, for example, the levels are known but there has been no agreement regarding acceptable levels, he said.

Assemblyman Robert Castelli (R-Goldens Bridge), who attended the WESPAC forum, said there are still too many unknowns regarding the impacts on health and the environment for him to support lifting the ongoing moratorium. He said more research is needed before he would feel safe voting for fracking.

“As far as the moratorium is concerned, I’m quite happy that that moratorium remains in place,” Castelli said. “It can remain in place forever as far as I’m concerned. I’m not naive but certainly it will be dealt with. We still need to study a bit more.”

Dr. Frances Delahanty, who is currently teaching an “Introduction to Peace and Justice” at Pace and helped organize last Tuesday’s event, said there is nothing to convince her yet that fracking can be properly regulated.

“The state is cutting back on regulators and personnel and there are very few regulators and, of course, once (fracking) happens you can’t undo it,” she said.

Fracking Debate Highlighted at Pace University Forums | The Examiner News.

View the pdf of the paper here with the article on page 3.

BroadwayWorld.com: Photo Flash: “Week Four Scenes -The Actors Studio Drama School 2012 MFA Repertory Season”

LOVE, LOVE, LOVE! Week Four of The Actors Studio Drama School’s 2012 MFA Repertory Season brings scenes from THE VOICE OF THE TURTLE (a young actress who has sworn off love gets stuck entertaining a soldier on leave), ORANGE FLOWER WATER (infidelity and the consequences of a romantic affair) and RED LIGHT WINTER (college buddies take off to the Netherlands and find themselves thrown into a bizarre love triangle). Free admission. Reservations: (212) 501-2099; ASDSRep@pace.edu

The Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University’s 2012 MFA Repertory Season (April 18 – 21) presents:  Scenes from the THE VOICE OF THE TURTLE, ORANGE FLOWER WATER, and RED LIGHT WINTER.
 
We have a peek at the production photos from all shows here!
 
Scenes from THE VOICE OF THE TURTLE (pictured), a romantic comedy by John William Van Druten dealing with the challenges of the single life in New York City during World War II.  Sally Middleton (Rachael Schefrin) is a young and struggling actress. She agrees to a date with Bill Page (Peter Marciano), a soldier on a weekend pass, after he’s stood up by her worldly friend, Olive. When Bill has a problem getting a hotel room, he ends up spending the weekend with Sally at her apartment. Both have to fight temptation as they become attracted to one another. Directed by Chris Triebel.
 
Scenes from ORANGE FLOWER WATER by Craig Wright tells the story of two ordinary married couples David (Daniel J. O’Brien) and Cathy (Kaitlyn Huczko) Larson and Brad (Jake Cullens) and Beth (Kara Marie Rosella) Youngquist who live with their children in the relatively peaceful town of Pine City, Minnesota. After years of maintaining a platonic friendship, David and Beth begin an adulterous affair with disastrous consequences. Directed by Colleen Britt.
 
A scene from RED LIGHT WINTER by Adam Rapp. A Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2006, this is the story of two 30-year-old college buddies who are vacationing together in Amsterdam.  Davis (Adam Petherbridge) is a successful editor while Matt (Lash Dooley) is a gifted but struggling playwright. Christina (Sarah Anne Miles) is a beautiful yet mysterious prostitute from The Red Light District. When Matt buys the services of Christina as a gift for Davis, all three lives will change forever. Directed by Ken Urso
 
Further details: www.pace.edu/asdsrep  The 24-hour reservation line is: (212) 501-2099 and email is ASDSRep@pace.edu Free admission.
 
Photo Credit: Scott Wynn, www.scottwynn.com

“Glee” (FOX TV): “Inside the Actors Studio” and The Actors Studio Drama School Incorporated into April 17 Episode – Finn’s Coming to Pace!

Ryan Murphy and the cast incorporated “Inside the Actors Studio,” Bravo and, most important, our school, into a development toward which “Glee” has been building since its first day. At the climax of an episode in which the show’s principals, facing graduation, shared their post-graduate dreams, the final holdout was Finn, who was wrestling with uncertainty about following Rachel to New York. After fifty minutes of music and drama, a scene occurred in which “Glee” reached a significant milestone in Finn’s and Rachel’s – and the series’ – history. As millions of young people in the “Glee” audience watched, “Inside the Actors Studio” and The Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University became an organic part of the “Glee” story!

Here’s what TV critics had to say in their Glee “Saturday Night Glee-ver” Recap: Figuring Out Post Graduation Plans which aired April 17, and included a shout-out to both the Inside the Actors Studio and indirectly by association The Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University:

From Jen Chaney’s Celebritology blog in The Washington Post:

Finn to decide that he wants to go to New York with Rachel and take classes at the Actors Studio. Yes, the same one from “Inside the Actors Studio” with James Lipton, a show on which, coincidentally, the “Glee” cast recently appeared. (I can’t wait to hear Finn Hudson eventually tell us what he’d like to hear God say when he arrives at the pearly gates.)

Denise Martin wrote in  TV GUIDE:
First he {Finn} sings “More Than a Woman” and then he tells Rachel he’s applied to what he calls that school that James Lipton hosts on Bravo, Inside the Actors Studio (better known as the Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University). 
Jeff Dodge, BuddyTV  recapped:
I’m Gonna Be An Actor
After leading on “More Than a Woman” in the choir room, Finn tells Rachel that he knows what he wants to do next year. He ended up identifying with John Travolta’s Tony from Saturday Night Fever. He decides that he wants to go to New York with Rachel, has applied to James Lipton’s Inside the Actors Studio (a nice nod to the fact that the Glee cast were featured in an episode of that show last week). It’s his dream to become an actor, though it comes out of left field because we’ve never seen him have an interest in acting … ever. But you know what? If that’s what he wants to do, I applaud him for finally making a decision regarding his future.
From Becky Kirsch of BuzzSugar:

Rachel and Finn recover from their fight about the future, but Finn’s still having serious doubts about whether or not he can make it in the real world as anything other than a competitive eater. He’s basically convinced that he peaked in high school, but all it takes is one magical viewing of Saturday Night Fever to make him realize his dream of going inside the actors studio. He tells Rachel that he’s ready to go to New York with her, and struts around to “Stayin’ Alive” to show off his newfound confidence.

BroadwayWorld.com: “Pace Performing Arts Presents DANCE OUT LOUD, 4/20-21”

Put on your dancing shoes this weekend and head to the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts to experience ballet, jazz, modern, theater dance, tap, contemporary, hip hop and aerial arts like you’ve never seen it before! BroadwayWorld reports that Pace is one of the only universities to offer aerial arts (dancing while suspended in air!).

BroadwayWorld.com highlights the third annual Dance Out Loud!

Pace Performing Arts presents “Dance Out Loud 2012,” conceived and directed by Rhonda Miller, director of Performing Arts’ Commercial Dance Program. The event stars more than 50 Performing Arts students, with a special appearance by Angelica Salem, Singing Artist/Pace Commercial Dance Student, who will perform her pop song, “We Rock the World.” Click here to watch a video. In addition, Pace faculty member Joshua Dean‘s “Dancing in Air,” a Pace First “Bad Boy” aerial number will be featured. Pace is one of the only universities to offer Aerial Arts.

WHEN: Friday, April 20th @ 8 pm, Saturday, April 21st @ 3 pm matinee and 8 pm.

WHERE: Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, 3 Spruce Street (east of City Hall), New York, NY 10038. Directions: http://bit.ly/qxH0g3

TICKETS: $8 for students/seniors; $12 for adults at the door or reserve in advance by emailing theater@pace.edu.

Choreographers: Joshua Dean, Lauren Gaul, Jen Littlefield, Melissa Rae Mahon, Rhonda Miller, Alisa Paradowski, Stephanie Torbik; Costume Design: Brain Hemesath; Lighting Design: Graham Kindred; Stage Managers: Elizabeth Caplan & Melissa Leslie; Student Choreographers: Brandon Contreras, Madison Embrey, Steven Langton, Courtney Taylor, Brett Thiele, Ashley Williams.

PACE’s COMMERCIAL DANCE program is an exclusive blend of the highest quality of professional dance training and theater studies. Students prepare for an all-encompassing professional career on stage, television and commercials with training by current working professionals in Acting, Vocal Studies, Technical Theater and a variety of current, pertinent dance styles such as Ballet, Jazz, Modern, Theater Dance, Tap, Contemporary, Hip Hop and Aerial Arts.

Photo credit: Danicah Waldo

 

EVENT ADVISORY, PACE NYC CAMPUS, APRIL 20-21 – “Pace PERFORMING ARTS Presents Dance Out Loud 2012”

Pace Performing Arts presents Dance Out Loud 2012 with a Dancing in Air “Bad Boy” number (aerial arts) and Singing Artist/Pace Commercial Dance Student Angelica Salem performing her pop song “We Rock the World.” Friday, April 20th @ 8 pm, Saturday, April 21st @ 3 pm matinee and 8pm, Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts.

Pace PERFORMING ARTS Presents … Dance Out Loud 2012

Conceived and Directed by RHONDA MILLER , Director of Performing Arts Commercial Dance Program

Starring Over 50 PERFORMING ARTS Students

Special Appearance

  • Angelica Salem, Singing Artist/Pace Commercial Dance Student who will perform her pop song, “We Rock the World”

Dancing in Air: A Pace FIRST

  • “Bad Boy” aerial number choreographed by Joshua Dean, Pace Faculty.  Pace is one of the only universities to offer Aerial Arts.

REHEARSAL VIDEO: Click here to preview a rehearsal!*  

WHEN: Friday, April 20th @ 8 pm, Saturday, April 21st @ 3 pm matinee and 8pm.

WHERE: Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, 3 Spruce Street (east of City Hall), New York, NY 10038. Directions: http://bit.ly/qxH0g3

TICKETS: $8 for students/seniors; $12 for adults at the door or reserve in advance by emailing theater@pace.edu

MEDIA CONTACT: Samuella Becker, sbecker2@pace.edu; 212-346-1637 or 917-734-5172.

BEHIND THE SCENES TALENT: Choreographers: Joshua Dean, Lauren Gaul, Jen Littlefield, Melissa Rae Mahon, Rhonda Miller, Alisa Paradowski, Stephanie Torbik; Costume Design: Brian Hemesath; Lighting Design: Graham Kindred; Stage ManagersElizabeth Caplan & Melissa Leslie; Student Choreographers: Brandon Contreras, Madison Embrey, Steven Langton, Courtney Taylor, Brett Thiele, Ashley Williams.  

PACE’s COMMERCIAL DANCE program is an exclusive blend of the highest quality of professional dance training and theater studies. Students prepare for an all-encompassing professional career on stage, television and commercials with training by current working professionals in Acting, Vocal Studies, Technical Theater and a variety of current, pertinent dance styles such as Ballet, Jazz, Modern, Theater Dance, Tap, Contemporary, Hip Hop and Aerial Arts.

Still Photos Credit: Danicah Waldo.

* Video credit: Executive Editor Samantha Bassford and Rachel Wildner from PopTV.

The Broadsheet Daily: “The Repertory Season at Pace University”

The Broadsheet Daily is Lower Manhattan’s daily newspaper covering Downtown news, people, places and events, including the five-week Actors Studio Drama School’s MFA Repertory Season.

The Broadsheet Daily has promoted The Actors Studio Drama School’s 2012 MFA Repertory Season weekly to the Lower Manhattan community in its online event coverage.

(Pictured) Here’s a scene from Week Three “Brilliant Traces” by Cindy Lou Johnson. Directed by Chris Triebel, performed by Amie Lytle and Ollie Oliver. Photo credit: ScottWynn.com

The Repertory Season at Pace University
The Actors Studio Drama School presents its annual Repertory Season at Pace University, in five weeks of theatre designed to introduce our graduating students to the professional world and the public in fully-professional productions of the work they have created during their three years of study. Here you will witness a weekly series of scenes, one-act plays and full-length plays, some of them written by our playwrights, and all of them directed by our directors and acted by our actors. Free. Reservations recommended; call (212) 501-2099 or email: ASDSRep@pace.edu. Through April 28. Wed-Fri 8pm. Sat 3pm & 8pm.

The Flint Journal: “University of Michigan Flint playwright talks Actors Studio, new play”

“(Writing plays) really just utilizes my strengths. I had a good ear for dialogue, and for me, it’s just a matter of being able to tell a story through characterizations. Even though I can do short stories or novels, I seem to be more at home when the characters are more engaged in the situation,” Sean Welch explains. “For me, it’s pretty exciting to see a couple of actors go up there and say the words I’ve written, in the moment. I don’t think there’s anything really like that.”

From The Flint Journal, by William E. Ketchum III

FLINT, MI—These days, Flint native Sean Michael Welch is living in New York, writing plays and earning his masters of fine arts (MFA) at Pace University’s prestigious Actors Studio-sanctioned drama school. His new play, “All An Act,” debuts during week five of the university’s Repertory Season, where Welch’s fellow graduating students will present other plays and scenes.

But before he was studying and working with the country’s elite, the Grand Blanc High School Graduate first explored his skills at University of Michigan Flint. He had grown an affinity for penning short stories in previous years, but after taking an acting class, he saw that writing plays was an experience that made even more sense.

“(Writing plays) really just utilizes my strengths. I had a good ear for dialogue, and for me, it’s just a matter of being able to tell a story through characterizations. Even though I can do short stories or novels, I seem to be more at home when the characters are more engaged in the situation,” Welch explains. “For me, it’s pretty exciting to see a couple of actors go up there and say the words I’ve written, in the moment. I don’t think there’s anything really like that.”

He cites U-M Flint professors Carolyn Gillespie and Professor Lauren Friesen as his primary support at U-M Flint, giving productive feedback and introducing him to other playwrights he would admire. Before graduating in 2000, he snatched up the 1999 Kennedy Center/American College Theatre Festival (KC/ACTF) John Cauble Short Play Award for “Earl the Vampire,” and the 2000 KC/ACTF Region III Ten-Minute Play Competition for “Charleston’s Finger.” The former, which he considers his first complete play, was about a vampire who begins a political movement to bring minority status to vampires in America. In “Charleston’s Finger,” a family has a dinner table discussion about how their son’s finger fell into his soup.

Welch moved to New York City afterward, and worked a regular job for eight years while writing nightly. He finally decided to attend grad school, and he was accepted into Pace University’s drama school sanctioned by The Actors Studio, a decades-old performers organization that, according to its web site, boasts award-winning actors Al Pacino, Harvey Keitel, and Ellen Burstyn as co-presidents. After head playwright Edward Allan Baker explained the benefits of the school, Welch loved the aspect of students engaging in acting classes.

“I always considered (acting classes) a bonus, as I still enjoy acting and still wanted to act,” Welch said. He lists the curriculum, being surrounded by other talent, and feedback from Academy Award-winning actor F. Murray Abraham as high points of the experience. “It hit on all points, and it allowed me to do what I was supposed to be doing and what I wanted to do.”

As his graduation nears, this month he participates in the school’s Repertory Season to premier his play “All An Act,” which is about two clowns who have to talk out a drunken night of debauchery to preserve their professional relationship and long-term friendship. After its debut, Welch plans and the play’s crew plan to set their sights on collecting donations to participate in the Edinnburgh French Festival in August.

“I think we’re in a very good place. I have an excellent director and two fine, very skilled actors who…have actually studied clowning, whether while in school or in their own time during the summer months,” Welch says. “I’m anxious to see what an audience makes of it. I think all the work they’ve put into it is worth viewing.”

BroadwayWorld.com: “Performing Arts at Pace University Presents An Evening with Zoe Caldwell, 4/23”

To Zoe Caldwell’s credit are four Tony Awards, an OBE (Order of the British Empire), and a book “I Will Be Cleopatra” published by W.W. Norton. She will be interviewed by Cosmin Chivu, Head of the Directing program at Pace Performing Arts (pictured).

Featured on BroadwayWorld.com:

Zoe Caldwell was born in 1933 in Melbourne, Australia, and quickly became a professional actress playing “Slightly Soiled” in “Peter Pan.” Telling other people’s stories, using other people’s words to keep audiences awake and in their seats was all she knew how to do, press notes state. She has spent the last half century learning more about her craft in many of the greatest companies of the Western World. To her credit are four Tony Awards, an OBE (Order of the British Empire), and a book “I Will Be Cleopatra” published by W.W. Norton. In 2003, she doffed her bonnet to the chancellor of Melbourne University and was made an honorary Doctor of Laws. Recently, she appeared in the film “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close” and starred in David Adjmi’s play “Elective Affinities.”

“The Masters Series” at Pace is dedicated to providing the new generation of students/artists with the opportunity of interacting with well-established, outstanding professionals that have developed new voices and ideas. The goal is to reinvigorate the theater’s ancient role as a public forum by focusing on the social and cultural context for the works of the American Theatre of today and tomorrow.  The evening’s guests engage in discussions of their unique practices and bodies of work, followed by a Q&A session with Pace BFA and BA Performing Arts students. 

WHEN: Monday, April 23, 2012 at 6:00 p.m.

WHERE: Pace University, Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, 3 Spruce Street, New York, NY 10038. Directions: http://bit.ly/qxH0g3

COST/RSVP: Free admission, open seating. Reservations: PerformingArtsPress@pace.edu 

PRESS RSVP: Samuella Becker, Pace Media Relations, sbecker2@pace.edu; 212-346-1637

MODERATOR: Cosmin Chivu (pictured),  Winner of the 2012 Drama League’s New Directors/New Works Project; the Head of the Directing program at Pace Performing Arts. 

BroadwayWorld.com: “Photo Flash: The Actors Studio Drama School Performs TOPDOG/UNDERDOG, BRILLIANT TRACES, RAISED IN CAPTIVITY”

WEEK THREE (April 11 – 14) from The Actors Studio Drama School’s 2012 MFA Repertory Season brings tales of two brothers who hustle cards and take money from fools (“Topdog/Underdog”); a runaway bride and a recluse who forge a bond during an Alaskan blizzard (“Brilliant Traces”), and two estranged siblings who reunite at their mother’s funeral (“Raised in Captivity”). Free admission. RSVP: 212-501-2099; ASDSRep@pace.edu

Click here to see pictures from this week’s shows on BroadwayWorld.com! 

Week Three of The Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University’s MFA Repertory Season (April 11 – 14) presents:

Scenes from the 2002 Pulitzer-Winning Drama Topdog/Underdog written by Suzan-Lori Parks. ARTISHA MANN and Crystal Thompson play two brothers, Lincoln and Booth respectively, who hustle cards and take money from fools. Lincoln, a master of the con game three-card monte, has abandoned a life of crime for a more respectable job impersonating Abraham Lincoln at an arcade. Booth is a petty thief who tries to emulate his older brother’s success by learning how to “throw the cards.” The brothers compete against each other, vying for control (think Cain & Abel). At any given moment, one may yield power over the other, only to relinquish it in the next. Directed by Colleen Britt.

The one-act play Brilliant Traces by Cindy Lou Johnson tells the story of Henry Harry (OLLIE OLIVER), a lonely man who has sworn off personal relationships to live an isolated existence in a remote cabin in the wilds of Alaska. As a blizzard rages outside, his seclusion is interrupted by Rosannah DeLuce (AMIE LYTLE), a distraught runaway bride from Arizona. Like Henry, she has been wounded and embittered by life, and wants to escape her responsibilities and get as far away from her loved ones as possible. Directed by Chris Triebel.

Scenes from Raised in Captivity by Nicky Silver. The play, which received a Drama Desk Award nomination for Outstanding Play in 1995, explores the guilt and redemption in the lives of two estranged siblings – Sebastian Bliss (DANIEL J. O’BRIEN) and his twin sister, Bernadette Dixon (HEATHER BURGHER) – when they re-unite at their mother’s funeral. Dr. Hillary MacMahon (MARIANNE VIDAL) is Sebastian’s needy therapist. A convicted murderer on death row, Dylan (ADAM PETHERBRIDGE), is Sebastian’s pen pal and closet relationship in recent years. Kip, Bernadette’s dentist husband (PETER MARCIANO), hates teeth. Directed by Melody Erfani.

Further details: www.pace.edu/asdsrep. The 24-hour reservation line is: (212) 501-2099 and email is ASDSRep@pace.edu. Free admission.

Photos: Scott Wynn, www.scottwynn.com

Playbill: “An Evening With the Legendary Zoe Caldwell to Be Offered at Pace University”

Australian director/actress Zoe Caldwell will share the stage of The Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts with Cosmin Chivu, Director of Pace’s BA Theater Arts/Directing Program, on Monday, April 23 at 6 pm.

By Adam Hetrick
12 Apr 2012

Pace University will host An Evening with the Legendary Zoe Caldwell, as part of its Master Series, April 23 at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts.

Four-time Tony Award winner Caldwell last appeared Off-Broadway in the U.S. premiere of David Adjmi’s Elective Affinities. The 6 PM event, moderated by Cosmin Chivu, is part of the series that aims to provide “the new generation of students/artists with the opportunity of interacting with well-established, outstanding professionals that have developed new voices and ideas.”

Click here to visit Caldwell’s page on the Playbill Vault.

Admission is free. The Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts is located at 3 Spruce Street, NYC.