THE JOURNAL NEWS: Prof. Greg Holtz Weighs In – Diversity Index Another Way to View Census Data

“More and more white people are moving out and going South or going into alternative places to retire, and they’re being replaced by a more diverse population, mostly Latinos,” said Gregory Holtz, professor of public administration at Pace University. “The people moving out aren’t going to look exactly like the people moving in.”

Published March 24, 2011

By Dwight R. Worley

Westchester and Rockland are among the most diverse counties in the state, according to an analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data released Thursday.

In the past decade, the counties have seen Hispanics, Asians and other minorities become a larger percentage of their populations. While communities with high numbers of minorities aren’t necessarily the most diverse — especially if they’re dominated by one group or have few non-Hispanic white residents — experts say the shifting demographics have bought a greater mix of races and ethnicities to the region.

“More and more white people are moving out and going South or going into alternative places to retire, and they’re being replaced by a more diverse population, mostly Latinos,” said Gregory Holtz, professor of public administration at Pace University. “The people moving out aren’t going to look exactly like the people moving in.”

Westchester and Rockland are the fifth and the seventh most diverse counties, respectively, in New York — behind the five counties of New York City — according to the USA Today Diversity Index. The index, developed by the newspaper, measures the likelihood that two people chosen at random from a particular area would be of different races and assigns a score of 0 to 100. A higher score indicates greater diversity.

Westchester’s index of 61.7 in 2010 is up from 55.1 in 2000. Rockland went from 46.4 to 53.9, while Putnam’s index of 30.7 compares to 19.4 a decade ago.

Wylene Branton Wood, president of the African American Historical Society of Rockland, said diversity is important, but even more critical is different groups learning about one another and working together.

“I think diversity means more than co-existing,” Wood said. “It means respecting each other’s traditions, working together to build a better community.”

Towns and villages, including Stony Point, Elmsford and Chappaqua, have also seen changes in their population mix.

Elmsford and Spring Valley are the most diverse communities in Westchester and Rockland, respectively, according to the index. Elmsford’s index of 78.8 increased from 72.4 in 2000; Spring Valley’s score rose nearly 5 points to 76.3.

The data also show:

• The region’s large cities and villages are among the most diverse areas. Peekskill, Yonkers, Ossining, Haverstraw and West Haverstraw all ranked high with scores over 70. White Plains has a score of 68.3.

• Largely white sections of Westchester and Rockland experienced the largest diversity gains.

Buchanan’s index score of 36.5 in 2010 is up from 12.2 a decade earlier, while Chappaqua’s score rose 22 points, to 40.6.

In Rockland, Stony Point had the biggest gain: 38.1 last year versus 20.2 in 2000.

• Despite a growing Hispanic population, Port Chester became less diverse, according to the index.

Its score dropped to 65.5 in 2010 from 68.3 in 2000.

A couple of other areas also saw a drop in diversity, including New Square — 2.2 in 2010 versus 6.7 in 2000 — and Kaser, whose score dropped about a point to 2.3.

Read original article here.

The “N” Word: Pace University Conference to Promote Intellectual Discourse

The Office of Diversity Programs at Pace University is presenting a forum for dialogue about the slur commonly known as the “N-word.” The 2007 Pace University Drive-In Conference: Laid to Rest? The N-Word and Other Language of “Dissed” Respect is intended to promote intellectual discourse about what is arguably the most infamous word in American culture.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact:
Cara Halstead Cea, Public Information, Pace University
914-773-3312 (Office), 914-906-9680 (Cell) chalstead@pace.edu

THE “N” WORD: PACE UNIVERSITY CONFERENCE TO PROMOTE INTELLECTUAL DISCOURSE

November 2 at Pace’s Pleasantville campus

The Office of Diversity Programs at Pace University is presenting a forum for dialogue about the slur commonly known as the “N-word.” The 2007 Pace University Drive-In Conference: Laid to Rest? The N-Word and Other Language of “Dissed” Respect is intended to promote intellectual discourse about what is arguably the most infamous word in American culture.

When: November 2, 8:00 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Where: Pace University Pleasantville campus, Kessel Campus Center

Who: Public admission is $95. Registration fee waived for Pace University faculty, staff, and current students as well as for current high school students. Valid ID is required. Media admission by press pass.

The morning to late afternoon event includes panel discussions with notables such as Michaela Angela Davis, a hip-hop feminist, fashion, lifestyle and pop culture commentator, and former executive fashion and beauty editor of ESSENCE magazine, Jabari Asim, author of “The N Word: Who Can Say It, Who Shouldn’t And Why”, and Wilbur Alderidge, Regional Director, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Westchester/Rockland County Chapter. There will also be workshops and speeches throughout the day. One workshop hosted by Dax-Devlon Ross, a teacher and basketball coach who works with urban youth, called Young, Black and Conflicted: The Uses and Abuses of the “N” Word, aims to get participants to reflect on how our beliefs and society mold us. Another workshop to be led by “Sance,” a rap artist, is called The Power of Labels in Hip Hop and will engage the audience in a game with the aim of teaching them how devastating it is to use inappropriate names in dealing with others.

Founded in 1906, Pace University educates achievers who are engaged with critical issues both locally and globally. Known for its outcome-oriented environment that prepares students to succeed in a wide-range of professions, Pace has three campuses, including New York City (downtown and midtown Manhattan), Westchester (Pleasantville, Briarcliff, and the White Plains Graduate Center), and the Pace School of Law in White Plains. The Pace Hudson Valley Center is located in Orange County New York. A private metropolitan university, Pace enrolls more than 14,000 students in undergraduate, masters, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Ivan G. Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, and School of Education. Visit Pace University at www.pace.edu.

Pace announces “Not On Our Watch” to intensify anti-hatred values

Pace University President David A. Caputo today announced a new initiative, “Not On Our Watch,” to intensify the University’s extensive efforts to combat intolerance and hatred and promote understanding and acceptance of diverse groups.

Contact: Christopher Cory, Executive Director of Public Information
917-608-8164 (cell), ccory@pace.edu (email via blackberry)

Pace University statement announcing
“Not on Our Watch” anti-hate campaign

Thursday, October 19, 2006

Pace University President David A. Caputo today announced a new initiative, “Not On Our Watch,” to intensify the University’s extensive efforts to combat intolerance and hatred and promote understanding and acceptance of diverse groups. He said:

“Since several recent hate crime incidents, Pace University has aggressively reached out to our many student organizations and campus councils that are concerned with promoting acceptance and combating intolerance. All of them are responding with deep concern and constructive suggestions.

“We also have contacted outside organizations, and I welcome the offers of cooperation we have received from the New York office of the Council on American Islamic Relations, the Anti Defamation League, and the US Department of Justice.

“The hateful acts against our community are rare in the history of this university, but they are intolerable acts against individuals and groups of individuals who are valued, respected and welcome members of our university community, and they are attacks against the very foundation of the University itself.

“I have asked all faculty and staff members and students to unequivocally condemn these actions and reach out to all members of our community with understanding, acceptance and compassion.

“I also announced a fresh anti-hate effort, building on our long tradition of campus activities against intolerance and for understanding and acceptance. This is being led by our Affirmative Action Officer, Lisa Miles JD. Since Monday this team has requested or held consultations and meetings with
• The New York office of the Council on American Islamic Relations
• the Anti Defamation League
• the US Department of Justice
• The Pace University President’s Commission on Diversity
• Pace Faculty Councils Downtown and in Westchester
• Administrative Councils (staff councils) Downtown and in Westchester
• Student clubs concerned with multiculturalism, gender and sexual orientation
• Separate meeting with Muslim Students Association
• Meeting of Downtown Campus student government and student club officers (Westchester Campus leaders meeting scheduled for Friday, 10/20)
• Pace Coalition for Diversity (15-year old Downtown Campus group)
• Pace Westchester Diversity Team (Westchester equivalent of Coalition for Diversity)

“Not on Our Watch”

“Based on the input so far, this team has approved plans for an intensified program to be called ‘Not on Our Watch.’ It includes
• Sensitivity training for students and the President’s Council of senior university administrators (planning and execution will involve CAIR, the Pace Muslim Students Association and many other the diversity groups on our campuses)
• First-responder training on proper protocols for incidents of bias by the Regional Director of Community Relations Services for the US Department of Justice (Reinaldo Rivera) for security officers and a broader team that will respond to bias incidents.
• Public forums on our New York City and Westchester campuses with panelists, Q&A, and open mikes, probably during week of Nov 6th.
• Distribution of a wallet card listing phone numbers for the University Safety and Security Department, Deans for Students, Residential Life, Counseling center, Health care center, Affirmative Action Office and Ombuds Office. This responds to input from students who said they weren’t sure who to call in emergencies.

“This was a surprise to us because incidents of intolerance are extremely rare here. But it indicates a set of issues we have to deal with and gives us a moment to act when we have people’s attention. Longer range programming is also being planned. — we are intensifying an ongoing, sustained effort.

“Pace does not pretend intolerance doesn’t exist. We are facing these incidents with the utmost concern, squarely and in public.

“Our tradition is to support students who are affected by intolerance, giving them systems for figuring out what they want to do about it and nurturing them through the process. These range from individual counseling to mentoring student groups to faculty encouragement to study social issues.

“When an internal survey in 2003-2004 asked students to say if they agreed or disagreed with the statement “I feel I need to hide some characteristics of my racial and ethnic culture in order to fit in at Pace,” only 11 percent of both undergraduate and graduate students agreed.

“Pace deplores as hateful incidents of bias of whatever kind. Bias is not only an attack on people, but on the fundamental nature of a University and people’s ability to learn from one another.

“While the investigation continues, and afterward, we welcome information and constructive ideas.

“Anyone with information that might be relevant to the investigation of these incidents should call the NYPD Hate Crimes unit

“Suggestions about anti-bias activities should go to Lisa Miles, e-mail lmiles@pace.edu or call 212-346-1310.”

Facts about Pace University anti-bias activities:

Pace is actively involved in the fight against hatred and intolerance, and in promoting understanding and acceptance. Our current efforts build on a long and deep tradition of community service and multicultural awareness programs. These are scheduled year after year by both the University and student groups, and many of this year’s events were scheduled well before these incidents.

In any given year our student organizations are likely to include those formed by students whose backgrounds reflect many ethnicities as well as organizations for women and students who are Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, InterQueer and Questioning.

During the University’s Centennial in calendar 2006 the Centennial Committee alone presented or co-sponsored Freeman Hrabowski, president of the University of Maryland/Baltimore County, on attracting minority group members to higher education and science; a two-day symposium on the legacies of slavery and feminism in the works of fugitive slave Harriet Jacobs ( author of “Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl: Written by Herself”); Maya Angelou; and a multinational colloquium of law professors from 44 first, second and third-world countries on enforcing global environmental laws.

Other current and past programs include forums on Palestine and Zionism, AIDS, American Indians, Hispanic multilingual cartoons, and SAFEZONE training to increase tolerance for different sexual orientations.

Community service is now a required component of the core curriculum.

The University is a founder of Project Pericles, a coalition of colleges explicitly committed to encouraging lifelong engagement by citizens in democratic processes.

Freeman Hrabowski to Speak on Cultural Diversity as Key to International Competitiveness

Freeman A. Hrabowski, PhD, president of the University of Maryland – Baltimore County (UMBC) and one of the few African-Americans to run a predominantly white research institution will speak about “Fostering Inclusion in Academia”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

** MEDIA ADVISORY**

EDUCATION INNOVATOR TO WARN
THAT CULTURAL DIVERSITY IS KEY
TO INTERNATIONAL COMPETITIVENESS

Innovative African-American president of University of Maryland/Baltimore County
to discuss lessons for widening inclusion
in Centennial speech at Pace University

WHO: Freeman A. Hrabowski, PhD, president of the University of Maryland – Baltimore County (UMBC) and one of the few African-Americans to run a predominantly white research institution will speak about “Fostering Inclusion in Academia”

WHEN: February 9, 2006, 12:00p.m.

WHERE: Pace University
One Pace Plaza, Multi-Purpose Room
New York, NY
* This event is free and open to the public
** Attending media must be credentialed

WHAT: Kicking off Black History Month, Freeman Hrabowski will join forces with Pace to speak about the United States’ capacity to respond to and embrace its growing diversity as a major determinant of global competitiveness. Hrabowski believes that colleges and universities will have a central role to play in preparing Americans for these changes.

Hrabowski has spent the majority of his professional career studying and improving minority academic participation and achievement. He has been enormously successful in producing a pipeline of minority graduates who go on to top graduate and professional schools and earn advanced degrees. Hrabowski was named a top innovator by Fast Company magazine.

This presentation is an early event in Pace University’s 2006 Centennial Celebration, marking Pace’s evolution into a full range private university providing opportunity and educating achievers in liberal arts and sciences, business, nursing, education, information technology and law.

For more information, please log-on to www.pace.edu/centennial

CONTACT: Cara Halstead Cea, Pace University, 914-773-3312, chalstead@pace.edu

Rosemary Mercedes, Pace University, 212-346-1637, rmercedes@pace.edu

Diversity “Across the Law School Experience” to be Focus of New Pace Law School Task Force

Pace University Law School today announced the establishment of a Dean’s Task Force on Diversity. The group will review the school’s institutional commitment to diversity and make recommendations to the faculty. Specifically, the task force’s terms of reference ask it to address diversity issues as they relate to recruitment and admissions, faculty and staff hiring, curriculum, student life, development and alumni relations, and career development.

Contact: Jennifer Riekert
(914) 422-4128
jriekert@law.pace.edu
www.law.pace.edu

Mary E. Horgan
(914) 923-2798
mhorgan@pace.edu

Release: Immediate

DIVERSITY “ACROSS THE LAW SCHOOL EXPERIENCE”
TO BE FOCUS OF NEW PACE LAW SCHOOL TASK FORCE

To be chaired by Keith Wimbush, Senior Client Partner at Korn/Ferry International

WHITE PLAINS, NY, August 26, 2003 – Pace University Law School today announced the establishment of a Dean’s Task Force on Diversity. The group will review the school’s institutional commitment to diversity and make recommendations to the faculty. Specifically, the task force’s terms of reference ask it to address diversity issues as they relate to recruitment and admissions, faculty and staff hiring, curriculum, student life, development and alumni relations, and career development.

L. Keith Wimbush will chair the task force. A Harvard-trained lawyer and member of the Law School’s Board of Visitors, he is a Senior Client Partner at the executive search firm Korn/Ferry International. Immediately before joining Korn/Ferry, he was Senior Vice President & General Counsel of Diageo North America.

The task force is to present a report of its findings and recommendations to the Law School’s Faculty Nominating Committee in two months, by November 1, 2003.

“The focus on admissions as a central element of diversity in education, exemplified by the public attention on the recent Michigan decisions by the Supreme Court, while extremely important, does not address the importance of diversity across the law school experience in the classroom, in student life, in career development and more,” stated Dean David Cohen. “Once students arrive at the law school, we have to make sure we serve their individual and collective needs in all areas.”

The other task force members are Dev Viswanath, a third year law student; Elana Roffman, a second year law student; Darnita Killian, Ph.D., Pace University Vice-President for Student Services; Professor Barbara Atwell; Mayo Bartlett, Class of ’90 and former head of the Westchester County District Attorney’s Office Bias Crimes Unit; and Gail Fillion, Executive Assistant to the Dean.

Founded in 1976, Pace Law School is a New York Law School with a suburban campus in White Plains, N.Y., 20 miles north of New York City. Part of Pace University, the school offers the J.D. program for full-time and part-time day and evening students. Its postgraduate program includes the LL.M. and S.J.D. degrees in Environmental Law and an LL.M. in Comparative Legal Studies. Pace has one of the nation’s top-rated Environmental Law programs and its Clinical Education program also is nationally ranked, offering clinics in domestic violence prosecution, environmental law, securities arbitration, criminal justice and disability rights. www.law.pace.edu

Center for Applied Ethics of Pace University Presents Free Lectures

Center for Applied Ethics of Pace University Presents Free Lectures at the Pleasantville and Manhattan Campuses

Contact: Mary E. Horgan, (914) 923-2798, mhorgan@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY

Center for Applied Ethics of Pace University Presents Free Lectures

WHAT: “Passing, Traveling, and Reality: Social Construction and the Rules of Race.”

WHEN: Tuesday, April 15, 1:30-3:30

WHERE: New York City, Lecture Hall South, One Pace Plaza

WHAT: “Beyond Anti-essentialism.”

WHEN: Wednesday, April 16, 1:30-3:30

WHERE: Pleasantville, Kessel Campus Center, Butcher Suite

WHAT: “Race, Capital Punishment, and the Cost of Murder.”

WHEN: April 22, 1:30-3:30

WHERE: New York City, Lecture Hall South, One Pace Plaza

SPEAKERS:

Michael Cholbi received his PhD from the University of Virginia and is currently assistant professor of philosophy at Brooklyn College (CUNY).
He has published articles on such topics as Kant’s moral theory, egoism, punishment, and suicide. He is currently working on problems surrounding moral skepticism.

Ron Mallon received his PhD in philosophy from Rutgers. He currently holds two academic positions, assistant professor in the philosophy at the University of Utah and a Visiting assistant. professor in the philosophy at Hong Kong University. His worked has appeared in Philosophy of Science, Social Theory and Practice (both journals). He has published in the areas of political philosophy, philosophy of science, metaphysics and race theory.

For more information on these events contact: Lori L. Alward, assistant professor of philosophy and environmental studies, (914) 773-3671. For directions: www.pace.edu

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu

Pace University Exit Poll Shows Effects of September 11 on Future Plans of Class of 2002

A heightened sense of civic volunteerism; respect for other races, religions and nationalities; and loyalty to New York City is the reaction of Pace University’s Class of 2002 to the terrorist attacks of September 11. An exit poll conducted between May 15 and 22 shows the resilience of a graduating class determined to help others at a time when it is needed most.

Majority of Students More Inclined To Become Involved With Public Service Activities; More Tolerant Towards Other Races, Religions, Nationalities; and Do Not Feel More Negatively About Living, Working in New York City.
New York, NY – May 23, 2002 – A heightened sense of civic volunteerism; respect for other races, religions and nationalities; and loyalty to New York City is the reaction of Pace University’s Class of 2002 to the terrorist attacks of September 11. An exit poll conducted between May 15 and 22 shows the resilience of a graduating class determined to help others at a time when it is needed most.

Several poll findings are of particular interest:

· Two-thirds of the students in the graduating class (66%) do not feel more negatively about living and/or working in New York City.
· More than a third of the graduating class (38%) is more inclined to become involved with public service activities.
· Nearly half of the students (42%) say they are more tolerant towards other races, religions and nationalities.
· Most of the students feel closer to their family (70%), their friends (67%) and their mate/spouse (53%).

The Pace Class of 2002 Exit Poll was designed to determine how the events of September 11 have affected students’ lives and plans for the future. Students responded to statements about their career options, further education and training, public service activities, closeness to loved ones, feelings about working and living in New York City, religious and/or spiritual beliefs, and needs as a student.

“I am extremely proud of the way the Class of 2002 has reacted to the tragic events of September 11,” said David A. Caputo, President of Pace University. “Rarely in our history have the talents, energy, resources and spirit of a graduating class been so severely tested.

“Pace University has long understood and firmly believed in the concepts of service and community involvement. We have a tradition of equipping our students to fulfill their duty to society by participating in public life and through direct involvement in matters important to public policy,” said President Caputo. “It is very heartening to see students engaging more with friends, family, neighbors and community social structures. They are recognizing the importance of becoming well-rounded individuals and understanding their larger role in society.”

Pace is located four blocks from the World Trade Center site, and is the largest comprehensive University in such close proximity. Pace’s World Trade Institute was located on the 55th floor of One World Trade Center. Miraculously, all of the staff and participants there on September 11 were evacuated to safety. On the night of 9/11, the first floor of Pace was turned into a field hospital and triage unit for police, fire and National Guard personnel.

Pace has since established the Center for Downtown New York, to utilize the University’s human and intellectual resources to provide expertise and assistance for the rebuilding and revitalization efforts.

“The impact of 9/11 tends to be somewhat different depending on where you are in your life,” said Dr. Richard H. Raskin, Director of the Counseling Center at Pace University. “For adolescents and young adults, the future lies ahead, the plans they have made generally are still what they are committed to. I think students’ reporting being closer to their family and friends is based on their sense of vulnerability. This is how they are touched by the tragedy and how they make a reasonable adjustment to it.

“For older people, this kind of tragedy makes them re-examine their lives and the things they value and then make changes that are more in keeping with what they consider important,” said Dr. Raskin. “This can mean making career changes, lifestyle changes, and changes that bring people more in touch with the sense that we have a limited amount of time and need to attend to the things we value most.”

The results of the exit poll are based on responses from 233 students of the Class of 2002. For more details on the results of Pace University’s Class of 2002 Exit Poll, visit <a href=’http://www.pace.edu/poll‘>http://www.pace.edu/poll</a>

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart International Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School.

Progreso Latino: Pace University to Host Celebration of Hispanic Heritage

In celebration of Hispanic Heritage month Pace University and the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences have invited local high school students and educators, Pace alumni and community members to participate in Progreso Latino on Friday, Sept. 28 beginning at 9:00 a.m. in the Gottesman Room of the Kessel Campus Center.

PLEASANTVILLE, N. Y. – In celebration of Hispanic Heritage month Pace University and the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences have invited local high school students and educators, Pace alumni and community members to participate in Progreso Latino on Friday, Sept. 28 beginning at 9:00 a.m. in the Gottesman Room of the Kessel Campus Center.

“Hispanic residents make up an significant part of the Pace community and Westchester County at large. We believe it’s important to recognize their achievements and continuing contributions for the diversity and overall strength of our campus community,” said Gail Dinter-Gottlieb, Dean, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences.

Over 100 high school students from area schools including, JF Kennedy Catholic High School, Peekskill High School, Hastings High School, AB Davis Middle School and Sleepy Hollow High School are expected to attend the event.

Marta Moreno Vega, PhD., president/founder of the Caribbean Cultural Center and author of Altar of My Soul – The Living Traditions of Santeria, will be the keynote speaker.

Current Pace Latino students will share their college experiences in an informal panel presentation. Pace representatives from Admissions, Financial Aid, Cooperative Education and Career Services and Pace Law School will be on hand to provide information about opportunities in higher education and applications for national and government-based scholarships.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Pace Law School to Host Law Day for Students of Diversity, Nov. 21

Pace University School of Law will host “Law Day for Students of Diversity” from 9:30 a.m. – 2 p.m., Saturday, November 21, on the School’s White Plains campus, 78 North Broadway. Prospective students can participate in a mock law class and will learn more about law school admissions, financial aid, and career opportunities in the legal profession. Students of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds are encouraged to attend. For more information, or registration, call (914) 422-4210.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. – Pace University School of Law will host “Law Day for Students of Diversity” from 9:30 a.m. – 2 p.m., Saturday, November 21, on the School’s White Plains campus, 78 North Broadway. Prospective students can participate in a mock law class and will learn more about law school admissions, financial aid, and career opportunities in the legal profession. Students of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds are encouraged to attend. For more information, or registration, call (914) 422-4210.

Professor Randolph Scott-McLaughlin, director of the Pace Law School
Social Justice Center, will provide the welcome address. The Center
provides practical legal training for those students who want to pursue
civil and human rights during their legal career. The Center’s student
interns are involved in national public interest litigation and are
engaged in virtually every aspect of cases and special counseling.

Professor Bennett Gershman, a former prosecutor with the Manhattan District
Attorney’s office, will lead a mock law class. All participants who pre-register
for the program will receive a copy of a case to discuss in class. Professor
Gershman is one of the nation’s leading experts on prosecutorial misconduct.

Founded in 1976, Pace Law School has nearly 5,000 alumni throughout the country.
It offers full- and part-time day and evening programs on its White Plains, N.Y.,
campus. The School has one of the nation’s top-rated environmental law programs,
and is part of a comprehensive, independent and diversified University with campuses
in New York City and Westchester County.

Author Esmeralda Santiago to Speak at Pace University, Oct. 28

Esmeralda Santiago, acclaimed author of When I was Puerto Rican and Américas Dream, will provide the keynote address during “Diversity Day” at Pace University, at 10 a.m., Wednesday, Oct 28. The address is funded by the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences’ 1996 National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant, in support of the NEH Humanities Initiative. The event will be held in the Kessel Campus
Center. The public is invited.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. – Esmeralda Santiago, acclaimed author of When I
was Puerto Rican and Américas Dream, will provide the keynote address
during “Diversity Day” at Pace University, at 10 a.m., Wednesday, Oct 28.
The address is funded by the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences’ 1996
National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant, in support of the
NEH Humanities Initiative. The event will be held in the Kessel Campus
Center. The public is invited.

Santiago was born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, and is the oldest of 11 children.
Her single mother brought her to the United States when she was 13. After
attending the High School for the Performing Arts, she graduated from Harvard
University in 1976 magna cum laude, and earned an M.F.A. from Sarah Lawrence
College. She is a journalist and owns a film production company with her
husband. She is the mother of two children.

“Diversity Day” also will include a performance of “Faces of America” from
12:30 – 2 p.m., sponsored by the Offices of Student Life and Services, the
Student Government Association and Common Voices. “Faces of America” portrays
true stories of nine young Americans, each of a different ethnic background,
in this truthful one-person show. It is written and directed by Will & Company’s
Artistic Director Colin Cox and is performed by Fran de Leon.

Pace University is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New
York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate,
graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences,
Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of
Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and World Trade Institute.