Pace experts available to discuss issues surrounding Hurricane Katrina and disaster recovery

Pace University has experts, including a New Orleans native, who can discuss issues surrounding catastrophes, including economic and political repercussions and post traumatic stress.

September 1, 2005

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University , 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY: Hurricane Katrina and Disaster Recovery

Pace University has experts, including a New Orleans native, who can discuss issues surrounding catastrophes, including economic and political repercussions and post traumatic stress.

Economic, Political Repercussions of Natural Disaster

Dr. Robert H. Parks, an economist and professor of finance at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in
New York City, was born in New Orleans and lived there for several years. He currently heads up his own firm counseling institutional investment officers and corporate comptrollers. He has served as chief economist for duPont Glore Forgan, Blyth Eastman Dillon, and Advest Institutional Services. He also has industrial and financial forecasting experience as an economist with General Electric.

Parks can discuss the economic and political repercussions of the hurricane disaster in New Orleans, including its effect on gas and oil prices, and how the federal sector is at fault for its inadequate preparations for dealing with a catastrophe of this scale.

Home phone: 914-923-6117; email drrhparks@optonline.net.

Trauma, Disasters, Counseling and Supervision

Dr. Richard Shadick is director of Pace University’s Counseling Center . Shadick is director of the Trauma Response Service of the White Institute and a member of the New York State Disaster Response Network. He frequently presents at conferences on issues related to 9/11, suicide, trauma, and complicated bereavement; actively engages in editorial work on a number of psychology journals; and has a private practice in lower Manhattan .

Shadick was involved in a study developing a new treatment to counsel those who are grieving the loss of a loved one from 9/11; was a lead trainer for the Mental Health Association’s grant to train 5,000 mental health professionals to respond to future terrorist attacks; has counseled Ground Zero workers; and worked clinically with survivors of 9/11.

Shadick can discuss post traumatic stress association with natural disasters. Office phone: 212-346-1527, home phone: 212-879-6845, email: rshadick@pace.edu .

Forensic Science

Brian Gestring is an Associate Professor of Chemistry and Physical Sciences and is also the Director of the Bachelors and Masters Programs in Forensic Science at Pace University . Prior to coming to Pace, Professor Gestring has worked as a death investigator, and as supervisory criminalist: in the World Trade Center Identification Unit; a DNA Laboratory; and a crime scene reconstruction unit. Professor Gestring has also served as a technical consultant for two prime time network television shows and still remains active as a forensic consultant.

Office phone: (212) 346-1967, email bgestring@pace.edu .

Additionally, Pace University will assemble a large number of experts in post-traumatic stress and counseling at two separate events taking place next week, as follows:

Friday, September 9, from 1-5 p.m. , at the
Michael
Schimmel Center for the Arts (downtown campus across the street from City Hall) – The editors and authors of On the Ground after September 11: Mental Health Responses and Practical Knowledge Gained will present distilled lessons they have learned during the four years since 9/11. Presentations will include clinical considerations encountered in traumatic events. For more information, contact: 212-737-8524 or
yael@aol.com

Saturday, September 10, from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. , at the Pace
University downtown campus – Pace will co-host Breaking the Cycle of Violence… Healing, Restoring and Rebuilding Ourselves and Our Communities. The full day event with talks and workshops is designed to help people deal with trauma and stress. For more information contact: Richard Raskin, Pace University Counseling Center , 212-346-1523.

A private university in the New York Metropolitan area, Pace has a growing national reputation for offering students opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. Approximately 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School.
www.pace.edu

Pace University Responds to Katrina Disaster

One of the largest private universities in the New York metropolitan area and the closest university to Ground Zero, Pace University is responding to Hurricane Katrina drawing on its experience with 9/11 as follows. Other initiatives are under consideration.

Contact
Rosemary Mercedes, Pace University
212-346-1637, Cell: 914-424-3845
rmercedes@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY MOBILIZES KATRINA RELIEF EFFORTS AND EXPERTS

New York, NY – September 1, 2005 — One of the largest private universities in the New York metropolitan area and the closest university to Ground Zero, Pace University is responding to Hurricane Katrina drawing on its experience with 9/11 as follows. Other initiatives are under consideration.

Disaster Relief Drives: University groups on the campuses in downtown New York City and Pleasantville, in Westchester County, are collecting clothing, blankets, toiletries, water, water purifying tablets, baby formula/bottles, first aid kits, canned goods/can openers; heavy duty trash bags, flashlights/batteries, duct tape, and other relevant items. Cash contributions are not being accepted.

The Pace University Pleasantville campus has also organized a blood drive with the American Red Cross. The contact for all activities there is John Agnelli, Director of Student activities, 914-773-3767 or sdca@pace.edu

The Pace University New York City campus contacts are: Denise Belén Santiago, (212) 346-1546 or dsantiago@pace.edu, or Melanie Robles, (212) 346-1261 or mrobles@pace.edu.

Post-trauma stress experts. By coincidence, large numbers of experts in post-traumatic stress and counseling will be assembling at Pace University at two separate events taking place next week, as follows:

·Friday, September 9, from 1-5 p.m., at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts (downtown campus across the street from City Hall) – The editors and authors of On the Ground after September 11: Mental Health Responses and Practical Knowledge Gained will present distilled lessons they have learned during the four years since 9/11. Presentations will include clinical considerations encountered in traumatic events. For more information, contact: 212-737-8524 or yael@aol.com

·Saturday, September 10, from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m., at the Pace University downtown campus – Pace will co-host Breaking the Cycle of Violence… Healing, Restoring and Rebuilding Ourselves and Our Communities. The full day event with talks and workshops is designed to help people deal with trauma and stress. For more information contact: Richard Raskin, Pace University Counseling Center, 212-346-1523.

Experts in other areas include forensics specialists who can comment on identifying bodies and a noted finance expert who is monitoring effects on the economy and gas prices. Contact Bill Caldwell, 212-346-1597.

After 9/11 Pace University played a central role in counseling not just for the Pace University community but for emergency respondents and many people in Lower Manhattan. Its Counseling Center provided training and research to people working with traumatized groups. Pace’s Center for Downtown New York (CDNY) has been a catalyst for numerous conferences on dealing with terrorism and rebuilding Lower Manhattan.