Associated Press: Professor Susan Herman Among Experts to Review Infamous NY Child Molestation Case

Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice included Pace criminal justice Professor Susan Herman in her panel of experts to reexamine a Long Island sex abuse case from the 1980s.

Associated Press: Pace Professor Susan Herman Empanelled for a Molestation Case Under Review

Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice included Pace criminal justice Professor Susan Herman in her panel of experts to reexamine a Long Island sex-abuse case from the 1980s.

Jesse Friedman in 2004 - AP Photo/FRANK FRANKLIN II

The case, depicted in the documentary film “Capturing the Friedmans,” ended in the conviction of 18-year-old Jesse Friedman and his father Arnold for molesting children attending a computer school run out of the family’s home in Great Neck, N.Y.

The Associated Press piece was picked up by over 100 publications, including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Seattle Press, The San Francisco Examiner, The Boston Globe, Law.com, and The Herald Online.

Read the full article here.

Professor Herman also recently had her letter to the editor published in The New York Times Book Review -in response to a review of Jessica Stern’s “Denial.”

NEWS RELEASE: Pace Advocate of ‘Parallel Justice’ for Crime Victims Appointed to New NY State Commission on Sentencing

A Pace University professor of criminal justice, Susan Herman, an advocate of “parallel” justice for crime victims, has been named to the state’s first-ever Permanent Sentencing Commission, which is charged with a thoroughgoing reform.

Susan Herman, lawyer and professor of criminal justice, is one of two academics chosen to help reform “convoluted” policies

Note: Herman is a resident of Fulton Landing in Brooklyn. She can be reached for interviews at Sherman2@pace.edu or her cell phone, number available on request. See contact below.

Photo available.

NEW YORK, NY, October 15, 2010 — Crime sentencing policies in New York State have not been comprehensively revised in more than four decades. They have been described as “convoluted,” and as deficient both in helping offenders reform and helping victims find restitution.

Now a Pace University professor of criminal justice, Susan Herman, an advocate of “parallel” justice for crime victims, has been named to the state’s first-ever Permanent Sentencing Commission, which is charged with a thoroughgoing reform.

Herman is a lawyer and the former executive director of the National Center for Victims of Crime in Washington, DC. A graduate of the Antioch School of Law and a former Special Counsel to the Commissioner of the New York Police Department, she is the author of a book published this summer titled “Parallel Justice for Victims of Crime” (National Center for Victims of Crime).

More than pie in the sky

A review of the book on the website Restorative Justice Online describes the work as “focused and balanced.”

The reviewer, Eric Asur, says the volume addresses “the billions of dollars of restitution that is not collected” and how the current victim compensation funds are “of limited utility, and may only assist victims of violent crimes with specific hardships.” Current compensation funds often are simply “inapplicable” to victims of “financial or identity fraud type crimes.”

The task of developing a new system “seems daunting,” Asur concludes, but he adds that “fortunately, the author presents more than a ‘pie in the sky’ dream,” recounting numerous pilot programs and legislative changes in other states.

New York could well become a leader in this field. Among the Commission’s jobs is increasing New York State’s “focus on crime victims, including efforts to broaden victim participation in sentencing and to facilitate victim restitution,” according to a press release from the state’s Unified Court system.

Distinguished colleagues

Two notable figures in the state’s legal community co-chair the new Commission — New York County’s new District Attorney, Cyrus R. Vance, Jr., and the Administrative Judge of the State Supreme Court’s Criminal Term in Kings County, Barry Kamins, a former criminal defense lawyer. The other member with an academic appointment is Shawn Bushway, PhD, of the State University at Albany.

New York State’s Chief Judge, Jonathan Lippman, announced the makeup of the Commission this week.

The establishment of a permanent commission was recommended by the most recent short-term commission on sentencing reform, chaired by former DCJS Commissioner Denise O’Donnell. The state’s current system was called “convoluted” by a Vice-Chair of the new commission, Patricia Marks, a Supervising Judge for the Criminal Courts of the Seventh Judicial District. The new commission is similar to commissions in many other states.

Herman has taught at Pace for five years in the University’s popular Criminal Justice program, which recently began offering an Executive Masters degree (MA) in Homeland Security. The Criminal Justice Department is part of the University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences.

About Pace University

For 103 years, Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter:  NYC | PLV

Contact: Christopher T. Cory, Pace media relations, 212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

Expert in Homeland Security Available for Comment

This fall Pace University will launch an executive Masters in Management for Public Safety and Homeland Security Professionals under the University and Agency Partnership Initiative (UAPI) created by the federal Center for Homeland Defense and Security, a part of the US Navy’s Postgraduate Center. Information about the program is at www.pace.edu/homelandsecurity.

Pace Criminal Justice and Security Chair Joseph Ryan Available for Comment on Homeland Security

EXPERT IN HOMELAND SECURITY AVAILABLE FOR COMMENT
– Director of Masters in Management for Public Safety and Homeland Security Professionals

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, May 5, 2010 – In an article in the New York Times, “Times Square Bomb Suspect Waives Rapid Court Hearing,” New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg is reported to be making a case that New York needs a larger share of federal homeland security money.

Joseph Ryan, Ph.D., chair of criminal justice and security at Pace, agrees.

This fall Pace University will launch an executive Masters in Management for Public Safety and Homeland Security Professionals under the University and Agency Partnership Initiative (UAPI) created by the federal Center for Homeland Defense and Security, a part of the US Navy’s Postgraduate Center. Information about the program is at www.pace.edu/homelandsecurity.

“The public’s concern regarding terrorism appears to depend on physical and temporal proximity to incidents,” said Ryan, director of the new master’s program. “The level of public interest is best characterized as episodic and ephemeral. Terrorism, homeland security, and weapons of mass destruction had not achieved top status for the American public before September 11, 2001.”

Ryan, a retired New York City police detective, is an expert in violent crimes and community policing as a tool in the war on terrorism. He has chaired a NYPD advisory group for the U.S. Department of Justice that developed security strategies for the 1996 summer Olympics and testified on risk management before the Congressional sub-committee on National Security, Emerging Threats and International Relations.

“The attacks on 9/11 changed how Americans viewed their vulnerability to terrorism,” said Ryan. “Fear and confusion were dominant themes surrounding the attacks and arguably representatives of the government were unable to respond efficiently.”

“The upheaval after 9/11 produced predictable reactions, many of which represented personal and political opinions rather than measured conclusions based on data,” said Ryan. “Missing from these was an ‘educated’ response on how our government can respond to future incidents more efficiently using existing activities.”

“It is the goal of Pace University’s Executive Masters in Management for Public Safety and Homeland Security to provide a educational forum to develop an ‘all hazards’ approach to future catastrophic events and the ‘general defense and the welfare’ of Americans,” said Ryan. “The program will help answer two questions: First, how can we prevent future attacks? Second, if there is another major event, how do we ensure that we are prepared to respond with existing resources?”

Areas of expertise: community policing, violent crime, domestic violence, security strategy, homeland security, risk management, police training, criminal justice and curriculum innovations in teaching criminal justice and security programs.

To reach Ryan:

Phone: 914 773-3814 or 212 346-1839

E-mail: jryan@pace.edu

Media Contact:

Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

Half-Million Dollar Grant Helps Pace Women’s Justice Center Help Abused Women

Pace Women’s Justice Center to receive nearly $500,000 Federal Funds to provide legal services for victims of violence, sexual assault and stalking in Westchester and Putnam Counties.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contacts: Cara Cea, Pace University (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

PACE WOMEN’S JUSTICE CENTER TO RECEIVE NEARLY $500,000 FEDERAL FUNDS TO PROVIDE LEGAL SERVICES FOR VICTIMS OF VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT AND STALKING IN WESTCHESTER AND PUTNAM COUNTIES

Center will partner on comprehensive services with El Centro Hispano, Putnam/Northern Westchester Women’s Resource Center, Victim Assistance Services and Hope’s Door

WHITE PLAINS, NY, September 10, 2009 –Sonia S (not her real name) was broken, physically and emotionally, as she struggled up the steps of an office in White Plains one winter morning last year. Her boyfriend had beaten her and chased their two children into a freezing back yard.

Yet with the help of the organization in that office, the Pace Women’s Justice Center, and its attorneys, law students, and community-based partnering agencies, she received custody of her children and she and they received shelter, an emergency protective order from Family Court, child support, safety planning, counseling and other essential support services so that she could move forward with her life free from violence.

As the economy adds stresses to households, women and families in Westchester and Putnam counties affected by domestic and dating violence, sexual assault and stalking will continue to get such services, thanks to a federal grant of nearly a half million dollars to the Pace Women’s Justice Center, a pioneering legal services program at Pace Law School (www.law.pace.edu/wjc).

The grant of $495,933 was obtained with the support of Congresswoman Nita Lowey, Congressman John Hall and US Senator Kirsten Gillibrand.

It goes to a center which over nearly 20 years has served almost 20,000 domestic violence victims and survivors and their children, and has trained hundreds of lawyers, judges, prosecutors, and police officers.

Pioneering The Center will use the funds to continue its partnership with four local shelters and community-based agencies — El Centro Hispano, the Putnam/Northern Westchester Women’s Resource Center, Victim Assistance Services, and Hope’s Door, formerly the Northern Westchester Shelter.

It will continue funding the work of attorneys, conducting legal clinics at partnering agencies, providing outreach particularly in underserved areas, such as Latino communities, and working with its partners to provide essential social services.

“The Pace Women’s Justice Center is a critical resource for women in our community suffering abuse or harassment,” said Lowey. “I am thrilled to have helped ensure their vital work enabling women and children to live free of violence will continue.”

“The Center has broken fresh ground in legal services by providing a critical safety net for hundreds of families every year, strengthening our state’s ability to reduce domestic abuse,” said Hall. “Especially in tough economic times, these services are so important to Hudson Valley residents.”

“The Pace Women’s Justice Center was the first law school legal center in the United States devoted to training attorneys on domestic violence issues,” said Gillibrand, a lawyer herself who is helping lead efforts to eliminate violence in New York. “This grant provides more than legal representation. It provides holistic, comprehensive services to forestall problems. And it will keep the Pace Women’s Justice Center working with a mix of agencies, shelters and centers around Westchester and Putnam.”

Said Jane Aoyama-Martin, Executive Director of PWJC, a lawyer who has fought domestic violence for over 20 years: “Each year, the Center provides legal services to battered women and their children in their struggle to free themselves from violence and abuse. Thanks to Congresswoman Lowey, Congressman Hall and Senator Gillibrand, this grant will allow the Center to continue its partnerships and collaborations to provide comprehensive legal and social services to Latina victims and survivors.”

About PWJC: Founded in 1991, over nearly 20 years the Center has grown from a legal resource and training center into a highly respected, multi-faceted institution serving over 2,500 victims and survivors of domestic violence each year. Because of its affiliation with Pace Law School, the Center has been able to make law students an integral component of its innovative programs, providing the students with practical experience and skills. In addition, the use of law students has improved the delivery of quality legal services to the surrounding community in a very cost-effective manner.

In addition to providing direct legal services, the Center sponsors a Family Law Lecture Series, a Moderate Means Divorce Panel, Elder Law Clinics, Elder Abuse Civil Legal Services, Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Trainings, and a Legal Helpline that receives over 3000 calls/year. The Center is located in Gail’s House at Pace Law School, 78 North Broadway, White Plains, NY 10603, and its helpline is at (914) 287-0739.

About Pace Law School: Founded in 1976, Pace Law School has nearly 6,700 alumni throughout the country and the world. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus. With an Environmental Law program consistently ranked among the top three in the nation (US News & World Report), the school also offers the Master of Laws in Environmental Law, Real Estate Law and Comparative Legal Studies, and an SJD in Environmental Law. Pace is also the first law school in the nation to offer a course of study focused on climate change law, which is included as a specialty track in its Master of Laws in Environmental Law. The School of Law is part of a comprehensive, independent and diversified University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu

Professional education at Pace University: For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality professional education resting on a firm base of liberal learning, amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Obama to Nominate Pace University Professor of Criminal Justice Benjamin Tucker as Deputy Director of White House Office of National Drug Control Policy

President Barack Obama has announced that he intends to nominate Benjamin B. Tucker, a professor of criminal justice at Pace University, as Deputy Director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy.

Contact:
Bill Caldwell, Pace Public Information, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

Note to editors. Mr Tucker is not talking to media. However, we will let you know when his public hearing is scheduled in Washington. Photo of Tucker in front of courthouse is available on request.

OBAMA TO NOMINATE PACE UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE BENJAMIN TUCKER AS DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF WHITE HOUSE OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY

Expert on community policing, lawyer and former NYC police officer was Executive Director of New York City Commission on Human Rights

NEW YORK, NY, July 29, 2009 – President Barack Obama has announced that he intends to nominate Benjamin B. Tucker, a professor of criminal justice at Pace University, as Deputy Director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy.

Professor Tucker is one of two New Yorkers who the White House announced as intended nominees yesterday, the other being David S. Ferriero, the Andrew W. Mellon Director of the New York Public Libraries, who will be nominated to be Archivist of the United States.

If confirmed, Professor Tucker’s title will be Deputy Director for State, Local and Tribal Affairs, Office of National Drug Control Policy.

The White House release said of Tucker:

“Benjamin B. Tucker currently serves as a professor of criminal justice at Pace University. With 40 years of experience in the fields of law enforcement and criminal justice, he is a recognized expert in community policing.

“He has worked as a consultant to the Urban Institute and as Director of Field Operations and Senior Research Associate at the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. Within government, Mr. Tucker served as Deputy Director for Operations at the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services; Executive Director of the New York City Commission on Human Rights; Deputy Assistant Director for Law Enforcement Services in the Office of the Mayor of New York City; and Chief Executive for School Safety and Planning at the New York City Department of Education.

“He began his career with the New York City Police Department in 1969, and prior to being assigned as beat cop, was one of a sel.ect group of new precinct service officers educated by medical and other substance abuse experts to conduct innovative drug prevention and education programs in city schools and colleges.

“Mr. Tucker was born and raised in Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn; he received his Bachelor’s in Criminal Justice from the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, and his JD from the Fordham University School of Law.

The White House release is at http://www.whitehouse.gov/the_press_office/President-Obama-Announces-More-Key-Administration-Posts-7-28-09. The University’s profile is at http://www.pace.edu/page.cfm?doc_id=27693.

For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Pace University and Queens College students team up with IRS criminal investigators

Financial crimes meet savvy students as Pace University and Queens College students team up with IRS criminal investigators as “IRS Special Agents for a Day”

September 28, 2006

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu
Admission by press credential.

Financial crimes meet savvy students as Pace University and Queens College students team up with IRS criminal investigators as “IRS Special Agents for a Day”
Friday, October 13

WHAT: A business owner skimming from his company, a bar owner keeping a second set of books, an identity theft scheme, a drug trafficker, a constitutionally challenged “non taxpayer,” and a race track pari-mutuel teller kickback scheme. These are some of the hypothetical noir situations that will be faced by twenty-six students from Pace University and Queens College when they become honorary “IRS Special Agents for a Day” in a unique one-day program organized by the New York Field Office Criminal Investigation Division of the Internal Revenue Service. U.S. Postal Inspectors and uniformed NYPD Officers will assist with program activities.

This is the first time the program is being held in the New York City area.

Students are placed in groups, each with an experienced Special Agent who coaches them and provides learning points along the way. The Honorary Agents then must follow the paper trail. Their day long investigation may start with an anonymous informant, a meeting with local law enforcement, or even some garbage. The accounting students select their next steps in gathering evidence, usually leading them to potential witnesses, played by seasoned Special Agents, CPA’s, and other volunteers. Some of the students will utilize the tools available to federal law enforcement officers, including use of undercover, surveillance, subpoenas, and search and arrest warrants. At the end of their scenarios, the students meet as a group to talk about their investigation and receive an evaluation from their coaches. The payoff, says IRS organizer Joseph J. Foy, is students realize that investigating financial fraud is complex and requires strong accounting, organization and communication skills. They get personal learning experience dealing one-on-one with top-notch, professional IRS criminal investigators. This is where academia meets the real world.

WHO: Joseph J. Foy, Special Agent, IRS Criminal Investigation Division (212-436-1032, joseph.foy@ci.irs.gov) and Susanne O’Callaghan, Associate Professor of Accounting, Pace University’s Lubin School of Business (212-618-6410, socallaghan@pace.edu) are available for interviews about the program.

WHEN: Friday, October 13, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

WHERE: Pace University, One Pace Plaza (across from City Hall), New York, NY.

“CSI:” creator to visit Pace

This Friday morning, April 23, Anthony Zuiker, creator and executive producer of the number one prime time TV series in America, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation™, will address future crime scene investigators at Pace University. He also will demonstrate forensic clues from the newly released CSI: The Board Game in a laboratory with the help of students and two Pace University forensics professors. Pace University has one of the fastest growing forensic programs in the nation.

Contacts:
Marc Hill MHConnectPhone: (705) 727-1690 xt. 1Cell (416) 894-3242mhill@mhconnect.com
Chris Cory Director of Public InformationPace University Ph: (212) 346-1117Cell: (212) 917-608-8164ccory@pace.edu

ADVISORY Event notice:
Assignment, entertainment, science, education and lifestyle editors

“CSI:” comes to Pace University
Creator meets with forensic students for lab week, demos game in forensices lab

New York, April 20, 2004 – This Friday morning, April 23, Anthony Zuiker, creator and executive producer of the number one prime time TV series in America, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation™, will address future crime scene investigators at Pace University. He also will demonstrate forensic clues from the newly released CSI: The Board Game in a laboratory with the help of students and two Pace University forensics professors. Pace University has one of the fastest growing forensic programs in the nation.

Students from Pace’s forensic science program will mark National Medical Laboratory Week and the launch of the new game, which is based on the show. The game, which plays just like the show, is an exciting way to learn about forensics.

National Medical Laboratory Week (April 18-24, 2004) is held yearly to raise awareness about the severe shortage of laboratory workers in America. According to the American Society for Clinical Pathology, the success of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation is inspiring students to choose careers in laboratories.

Who:
· Anthony Zuiker, creator and executive producer, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, CSI: Miami, and the upcoming CSI: New York
· Dr. Melvin Oremland, director of forensic science, professor of chemistry and physical science
· Dr. Brian Gestring, adjunct professor of forensics, senior official, NYC Medical Examiner’s Office

What: Zuiker will meet with students, launch CSI: The Board Game and demonstrate forensic clues in Pace’s forensics laboratory

Where: Pace U, 1 Pace Plaza, on Park Row (between Spruce & Frankfurt, across from City Hall)

When: 11 a.m., Friday, April 23

Mystery and intrigue comes home in the board game as people get the chance to test their skills at solving crime cases in CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ™. Players draw on cutting-edge scientific methods and old-fashioned police work in solving eight true-to-life stories. This event marks the launch of the game, which is now available at retailers across America. Visit www.playcsi.com.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university committed to opportunity, teaching and learning, civic involvement and measurable outcomes.. Www.pace.edu.

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Key Players in Prison Reform to Meet at Groundbreaking Summit

At a time when the United States’ prison and jail population has reached an all-time high of two million, the nation’s leading practitioners in criminal justice will gather to discuss strategies for meaningful prison reform. The symposium will be held at the New York State Judicial Institute at Pace Law School in White Plains, NY from October 16 to 18, 2003 and is co-sponsored by the Open Society Institute (visit www.law.pace.edu/aboutpace/directions.html for directions).

Key Players in Prison Reform to Meet at Groundbreaking Summit
Conference will bring together law enforcement, advocates, legislators, and academics to discuss prison reform on Oct. 16-18 at Pace Law School in White Plains, NY

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE. The event is closed to the general public, and attendance by professionals is by invitation only. Media are welcome.

CONTACT:
Jennifer Riekert
(914) 422-4128
jriekert@law.pace.edu
www.law.pace.edu

Mary E. Horgan
(914) 923-2798
mhorgan@pace.edu

WHITE PLAINS, NY, October 7, 2003 — At a time when the United States’ prison and jail population has reached an all-time high of two million, the nation’s leading practitioners in criminal justice will gather to discuss strategies for meaningful prison reform. The symposium will be held at the New York State Judicial Institute at Pace Law School in White Plains, NY from October 16 to 18, 2003 and is co-sponsored by the Open Society Institute (visit www.law.pace.edu/aboutpace/directions.html for directions).
As the prison population has grown, the legal and political environment has shifted, making prison reform more difficult to achieve through litigation. The U. S. Supreme Court led the way for reform over thirty years ago, but in recent years has consistently ruled against the claims of inmates and established new doctrines and standards that restrict prisoners’ rights. Congress made a dramatic change in 1996 when it passed the Prison Litigation Reform Act (PLRA), which established new barriers between inmates and the judiciary.
These significant changes require the development of new responsive strategies.

Among those who will participate in the symposium, entitled “Prison Reform Revisited: The Unfinished Agenda,” are:
· Al Bronstein, noted civil liberties lawyer and founder of the ACLU Prison Project;
· Bob Gangi, Executive Director of The Correctional Association of New York.
· Don Cravins, State Senator, Louisiana;
· Vivien Stern, Member of the House of Lords and founder of Prison Reform International;
· Noval Morris, noted author, criminologist, lawyer, Dean Emeritus of the University of Chicago Law School;
· Jamie Fellner, Director of U.S. Programs of Human Rights Watch
· Margo Schlanger, Professor at Harvard Law School; and
· Reginald A. Wilkinson, Head of the Ohio Prison System.

The symposium will provide an historic opportunity to take stock of judicially-ordered or inspired reform accomplishments to date; assess the current state of the law and obstacles to court-ordered reform; discuss the issues currently of greatest concern to reformers; consider ways to litigate and settle cases in the post-PLRA era; examine new strategies for reform; analyze what reformers hope to accomplish; and learn about international developments.

95% recidivism. As the U.S. prison population surpasses that of any industrialized nation, the mentally ill, the poor, and racial minorities are all dramatically over-represented behind bars. U.S. prisons have become increasingly harsh and now use a segregation-type confinement called “super-max.” Although more than 600,000 people leave prison every year, there is a failure to successfully return them home to their communities. Ninety-five percent of all people who go to prison or jail eventually return.

The event will be held at the facilities of the New York State Judicial Institute at Pace Law School, the newly-opened institute usually used for training judges and court personnel.

Professor Michael Mushlin is organizing the symposium. He is a Professor of Law at Pace and for seven years served as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. He has extensive experience in prison reform as a lawyer, prison reform advocate and academic. Before entering academia, he was Project Director of the Prisoners’ Rights Project of the Legal Aid Society of New York, and Associate Director of the Children’s Rights Project of the American Civil Liberties Union where he litigated major cases involving institutional reform. He is the Author of “Rights of Prisoners” (3d ed 2003) published by Westgroup. This three- volume treatise is one of the leading references used in the field of prison law. He is a member of the board of the Correctional Association of New York and is Past Chair of the Board. In addition, he served as Chair of the Committee on Corrections of the Association of the Bar of the City of New York.

Founded in 1976, Pace Law School is a New York law school with a suburban campus in White Plains, N.Y., 20 miles north of New York City. Part of Pace University, the school offers the J.D. program for full-time and part-time day and evening students. Its postgraduate program includes the LL.M. and S.J.D. degrees in Environmental Law and an LL.M. in Comparative Legal Studies. Pace has one of the nation’s top-rated Environmental Law programs and its Clinical Education program also is nationally ranked, offering clinics in domestic violence prosecution, environmental law, securities arbitration, criminal justice, and disability rights. www.law.pace.edu

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City, Pleasantville and White Plains, NY and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport in New Windsor, NY. More than 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate, and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu

Westchester Commissioner of Probation & Correction is Appointed Executive in Residence at Pace Univ.

Westchester County’s Commissioner of Probation and Correction, Rocco A. Pozzi, has been appointed Executive in Residence at Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences in the Criminal Justice and Sociology department. There he will provide expertise for enhancing a component of the undergraduate criminal justice program tailored for correction officers. Student enrollment in this program has increased by 50 percent during the past several years.

Contact: Mary Horgan, Pace University Public Relations
914-923-2798, mhorgan@pace.edu
Or Susan Tolchin, Westchester County Executive Public Information Office
914-995-2932

TO PROVIDE EXPERTISE IN NEW APPROACH TO INMATE RELEASE,
WESTCHESTER COMMISSIONER OF PROBATION AND CORRECTION
IS APPOINTED EXECUTIVE IN RESIDENCE AT PACE UNIVERSITY

Part of rapid growth in college degree program for correction officers

New York, NY – April 23, 2003 – Westchester County’s Commissioner of Probation and Correction, Rocco A. Pozzi, has been appointed Executive in Residence at Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences in the Criminal Justice and Sociology department. There he will provide expertise for enhancing a component of the undergraduate criminal justice program tailored for correction officers. Student enrollment in this program has increased by 50 percent during the past several years.

Pozzi’s commitment will be made on his free time and will not interfere with his commissioners’ duties.

The concept of college degrees for prison guards has been gaining strength among correction and criminal justice officials throughout the country, with Pozzi a leading advocate in Westchester County. The reason has to do with new roles for these officials.

As more and more communities face the release of prison inmates who have completed their sentences, there is growing concern among correction, probation, and parole officials about the lack of transitional services to help them re-enter society successfully.

There also is a growing idea about how to improve those services.

Pozzi explained: “Correction officers interface on a constant basis with prison inmates. We are missing a wonderful opportunity to draw from that relationship to assist inmates with a successful re-entry.” The new goal is to prepare correction officers for working more closely with probation officers, who are required to have college degrees, on a “seamless re-entry” approach.

“A college education is important in making that process work,” said Joseph Ryan, Ph.D., professor and chairperson of the Pace Criminal Justice and Sociology department. “Correction officers who have a four-year college degree will have a much better understanding of the needs of inmates. This understanding will enable them to participate with the probation officer in developing a plan that prepares inmates for re-entry and a better outcome.”

Solutions and responsiveness. Said Pace University President David A. Caputo: “Providing an educational program that prepares correction officers to help former prison inmates become productive citizens is one way Pace University can contribute to a solution to recidivism. We are most delighted to have Commission Pozzi as Executive in Residence and look forward to his valuable contributions to the program.”

County Executive Andy Spano said he was pleased that Commissioner Pozzi would be able to share his expertise with those entering the field. “Commissioner’s Pozzi has many years of valuable experience that Dyson College and its students can benefit from,” said Spano. “As a former educator, I have always urged my commissioners to go out into the community and share their knowledge for the betterment of the community. This is the perfect opportunity for Commissioner Pozzi to do just that.”

“Dyson College continually strives to provide the community with programs that respond to the evolving needs of society and the workplace. With Commissioner Pozzi’s assistance, we intend to develop an innovative program that is responsive to the requirements of the correctional community,” said Dyson’s Dean, Gail Dinter-Gottlieb.

Conferences and new components. Pozzi has served the Pace program informally since the fall of 2002. He helped Pace develop a successful conference titled “Challenges for Corrections in the 21st Century: Transitional Planning Through Quality Services Within and Outside the Walls.” He also assisted in recruiting an adjunct professor who teaches an online course on correction administration.

In his new role, Pozzi will continue collaborating with Dr. Ryan to develop and sponsor seminars and conferences tailored for correction, probation, and parole officials, as well as on developing new components of the degree program.

Pozzi, a former correctional officer, joined Westchester County as Commissioner of Probation in 1989 and was also appointed Commissioner of Correction in 1998. He holds a B.S. in criminal justice from Pennsylvania State University and a Master’s in Public Administration with an emphasis on judicial administration from Temple University. He has completed the Executive Seminar for State and Local Government Officials at the JFK School of Government at Harvard University.

Those seeking more information on the Pace program can contact Dr. Joseph Ryan at (914) 773-3674, email jryan@pace.edu or visit the departmental Web site at www.pace.edu/dyson/criminaljust/index.html.

The Pace department of criminal justice and sociology combines the disciplines of criminal justice, sociology, anthropology and human services, and offers programs that give students an academic and practical background with a specific focus on civic competency and civic involvement.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, N.Y., and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart International Airport in New Windsor, N.Y. More than 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing, and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu

Pace University to Host Offender-Reentry Conference

As more and more communities face the release of prison inmates, who have completed their sentences, there is a growing concern among corrections, probation, and parole officials about the lack of transitional services designed to assist in their successful re-entry to society. To respond to these issues, Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts & Sciences’ Department of Criminal Justice and Sociology will host Challenges for Corrections in the 21st Century: Transitional Planning Through Quality Services Within and Outside the “Walls.” The goal of the conference is to explore new developments in the corrections, probation, and parole field that focus on providing inmates with mental health, job training, educational, and other transitional services.

Justice Department Official to Open Conference for New York State and Westchester County Correction, Probation and Treatment Professionals

WHITE PLAINS, N. Y. – November 12, 2002 —

“The collective goal of the conference participants is that these men and women become productive members of society,” said Joseph Ryan, chair of the department of criminal justice and sociology. “Ultimately, we hope that the conference will result in the design and implementation of services for former inmates, reduce the rate of recidivism, and promote public safety for everyone.”

Location: Pace University’s Graduate Center, 1 Martine Avenue, White Plains, N.Y.

Time: 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM

Date: Wednesday, November 20, 2002.

Format:
The morning will begin with opening remarks from Westchester County Executive Andrew J. Spano

The keynote speaker, Honorable Sarah Hart, Director, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Dept. of Justice and former Chief Counsel to the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections, will follow with her address,
Re-Thinking Offender Re-Entry in the 21st Century.

After lunch panel discussions will include: Identifying Special Needs Inmates and Organizing Exemplary Programs in Corrections; Transition Planning – Linking Corrections to the Community; and Improving Post-Release Services and Supervision.

Presenters:
Glenn Goord, Commissioner, New York State Department of Correctional Services;
Rocco A. Pozzi, Commissioner, Westchester County Department of Correction and Probation;
Harold Smith, Executive Director, Central New York Psychiatric Center, N.Y. State Office of Mental Health; Joseph Glaser, Executive Director & CEO, Mental Health Association of N.Y. State;
Martin Cirrincione, Executive Director, New York State Division of Parole;
Jennifer Schaffer, Ph.D., Commissioner, Westchester County Department of Community Mental Health; Michael Jacobson, Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center, Professor and Former Commissioner of Correction and
Probation, City of New York.

For more information on the conference contact Dr. Joseph Ryan at (914) 773-3674 or e-mail jryan@pace.edu. Registration fee of $25 includes breakfast and lunch.

Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts & Sciences offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in the arts, humanities and sciences, and guides the general education of all Pace University undergraduate students. The College’s teaching philosophy stresses a combination of classroom instruction, technology, practical experience and community service.