Crain’s New York Business: “Pace University launches entrepreneur lab”

Following the lead of schools like New York University and Columbia University, a group at Pace University has created a space for the school’s budding entrepreneurs to call home.

Downtown business school creates a space to foster entrepreneurialism among its students

By Emily Laermer
February 15, 2012
 
Following the lead of schools like New York University and Columbia University, a group at Pace University has created a space for the school’s budding entrepreneurs to call home. 
 
The lab, located on the third floor of 163 William St., will open Thursday. It was the brainchild of Neil Braun, the dean of the university’s Lubin School of Business. However, it will be available for use by all Pace students, not just those from the business school, he said. 
 
“It’s about more than starting companies. Entrepreneurship, to me, is a mindset, a way of thinking and interdisciplinary doing,” said Mr. Braun, adding that the lab will be open to students in all of Pace’s specialized schools, which include programs for computer sciences, business, education and health professions, as well as an arts and science program.
 
Before becoming dean of Lubin 18 months ago, Mr. Braun was the president of NBC Television Network and CEO and chairman of Viacom Entertainment.
 
Mr. Braun would not disclose the financials of the lab, but he noted that funding will come from the university. He said the university “reallocated funds that were used for other things that outlived their utility,” adding that he expects future successes from the lab will justify the cost.
 
The lab will include space for students to conference with investors, a studio for them to work and a large meeting room for speakers. Bruce Bachenheimer, the director of the lab and a professor at Lubin, says he plans to reach out to some of the thousand-plus Pace-area alums who self identify as entrepreneurs to be potential guests.
 
“This will be very student focused,” Mr. Bachenheimer said. “It’s important for me to see how the students are using the lab and what is providing them with the most value.”
 
In fact, Mr. Bachenheimer says he has seen an increase in student interest in entrepreneurship in recent years. He blames this on the economy and the high unemployment rate. Students see creating their own companies as a safer route.
 
“They also want to make something meaningful and create something,” he said.
 
Part of the inspiration for this lab stemmed from competitions at other schools like Stanford University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Locally, New York University launched its Innovation Venture Fund in 2010. This group offers seed money for startups built at the university. In November, the organization helped organize an Entrepreneurs Festival for its students.
 
NYU also partnered with Columbia University to organize hackNY, an group that aims to connect tech-minded students with startups. Columbia has its own lab, Columbia Technology Ventures, which launches about a dozen startups per year.
 
Pace will be hosting a ribbon-cutting event Thursday evening at the lab to mark its official launch. In addition to members of the Pace community, speakers for the reception include Gurbaksh Chahal, the founder, chairman and CEO of online advertising network RadiumOne, and Robert Walsh, the commissioner at the city’s Department of Small Business Services.

The Wall Street Journal: “A Serious Illness or an Excuse?”

As mental health problems become less stigmatizing, more college students are comfortable asking their professors for test extensions and excused absences due to bouts of depression and panic attacks.

Schools say they are seeing a rise in the number of students registering with their disability offices due to psychological problems. At Pace University in New York, the number of requests for accommodations from students with disabilities related to psychological disorders tripled in the last three years according to an article in The Wall Street Journal.

But there’s hand-wringing among university administrators and faculty about how to support college students with mental health issues while making sure young adults progress academically. One of the goals of college, after all, is to prepare students for the working world. And not every boss may be OK with a blown deadline for a critical client report, no matter the reason. Professors also want to make sure they’re being fair to all students.

Some formal accommodations, like additional test time, are fairly standard across universities and apply to students with physical and learning disabilities, too. But, schools diverge widely on formal accommodations for flexibility with assignment deadlines, class attendance and participation. Some schools leave it up to individual instructors. Others intervene more directly on students’ behalf.

One Mental Health Message Does Not Fit All; Pace University Customizes Suicide-Prevention Outreach to Reflect Multicultural and Sexual Differences

“It is our belief that diversity issues have yet to be comprehensively addressed in suicide prevention, despite the urgent need to do so,” said Dr. Richard Shadick.

Uses $364,000 SAMHSA Grant; Offers Kits Free to Schools – 

NEW YORK, NY, October 28, 2010 – “The way a young gay Puerto Rican man will tell you he is feeling depressed and suicidal differs greatly from the way an Asian-American student will tell you,” says Richard Shadick, PhD, director of the Counseling Center on Pace University’s New York City campus and an adjunct professor of psychology.

Building on that insight, Pace’s Counseling Center is using grants totaling $364,000 from the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to enhance the multicultural competence of staff and faculty members who work with students and may refer them to counseling.

Multicultural Competence Suicide Prevention Kits – including brochures and posters, educational materials, public service announcements and training vignettes for role play – have been created, targeting students from seven different groups: African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Muslims, Latinos, international students, disabled students and those who are lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered (LGBT). Staff members have also disseminated these kits to schools nationally and trained mental health professionals on other campuses on how to use them. Their efforts have been featured as a model program in a SAMHSA suicide prevention monograph.

“It is our belief that diversity issues have yet to be comprehensively addressed in suicide prevention, despite the urgent need to do so,” said Shadick, pointing out those who are at particular risk being:

African-Americans who are alienated from their spiritual community or feel a stigma in seeking counseling.

Asian-Americans who feel a conflict between Asian culture and American culture.

Disabled students who deny the impact of their disability and have persistent beliefs in attaining full health and/or ability when it is not possible.

LGBT students who lack of family acceptance and support of their sexuality.

International students who are struggling with acculturation, socially isolated and have language barriers.

Latinos who are socially isolated from their spiritual community, in the midst of a relationship break up high or who endure sexual abuse.

Muslims who are struggling with their spirituality or who are disconnected from family.

Further efforts are underway at Pace, which is recognized for its undergraduate and graduate programs in clinical psychology, to research the nature of suicide for diverse student groups.

Schools who would like to obtain a free Multicultural Competence Suicide Prevention Kit should send their request to Dr. Shadick at rshadick@pace.edu

Psychology Department on Pace University’s New York City Campus

Pace offers two undergraduate degrees, a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Bachelor of Arts in Applied Psychology and Human Relations; and four graduate degrees, MSEd in School Psychology, MSEd in Bilingual School Psychology, MA in General Psychology, and PsyD in School-Clinical Child Psychology. Pace’s PsyD degree is approved by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) and accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA), and is one of only 10 nationwide recognized as a combined professional-scientific doctoral program by the APA.

Professional Education at Pace University

Since 1906, Pace University has offered professional education that combines liberal arts with practical experience and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York. It enrolls more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences (which includes The Actors Studio Drama School’s MFA, the Acting BFA, Musical Theater BFA and Theater Arts BA programs), Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

For more information:

Samuella Becker
Media Relations/Pace University
(212) 346-1637 or (917) 734-5172
Sbecker2@pace.edu

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Psychological Impact of College Violence on Israel and U.S. to be Explored in Workshop

Berger will discuss the impact of terrorism on the individual, professional community, society and culture.

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

NOTE: Journalists are welcome but must RSVP by contacting Dr. Berger in advance at Riberger@netvision.net.il and agree to ground rules for protecting the confidentiality of participants.

MEDIA ADVISORY

November 9, 2004

PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF COLLECTIVE VIOLENCE ON ISRAEL AND U.S. TO BE EXPLORED IN WORKSHOP BY INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED EXPERT, TUESDAY, NOV. 9, AT PACE UNIVERSITY

WHO: Rony Berger, PhD, director of community services for Natal – The Israel Trauma Center for Victims of Terror and War. Berger, a clinical psychologist, is an internationally recognized expert in dealing with psychological preparation for and aftermath of terrorist attacks. Berger brings years of experience in work with victims of terrorist attack, emergency relief medical teams, first responders and direct clinical providers.

Berger will discuss the impact of terrorism on the individual, professional community, society and culture. Specific issues will be the effects of living under conditions of uncertainty and ongoing threat on personal security, interpersonal relationships, perceptions of the “other,” and the collective identity. Berger will also present suggestions about how to cope.

WHAT: Pace University workshop: “Society Under Siege: Is there a National Trauma Syndrome?” Over the last decade, increased acts of terrorism around the world, causing immeasurable suffering, have led to unprecedented challenges for understanding the extent and nature of impact and planning effective response. This workshop will explore the psychological impact of collective violence and trauma on Israeli society, the United States and other parts of the world.

WHEN: Tuesday, November 9, 4 to 5:30 p.m.

WHERE: Pace University, One Pace Plaza, Lecture Hall South, New York City.

As a private metropolitan university, Pace has a growing national reputation for offering students opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. It is one of the ten founders of Project Pericles, developing education that encourages lifelong participation in democratic processes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. Approximately 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu.

New Twist on Orientation to “College 101” -The Basis of Credit-to be Taught at Pace University

Sponsored by the Education Foundation of the American Banking Association as part of its second annual Get Smart About Credit Day, Miriam Solomon, Financial Education Specialist of Citigroup will kick off a series of at least 11 visits by Citigroup people to “College 101” classes at Pace University, teaching students how to use credit responsibly and build a positive payment history.

CONTACT: Helen Steblecki, 718-248-4694, helen.steblecki@citigroup.com
Or Bill Caldwell, Pace University, 212-346-1597
Or Chris Cory, Pace University, 212-346-1117, ccory@pace.edu

October 18, 2004
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
New York, NY

NEW TWIST ON ORIENTATION TO ‘COLLEGE 101’ – THE BASICS OF CREDIT —
TO BE TAUGHT AT PACE UNIVERSITY DOWNTOWN CAMPUS
BY CITIGROUP VOLUNTEERS

WHO: First-year students in the “College 101” course at Pace University’s downtown campus
(across from City Hall)

WHEN: Thursday, October 21 at 11:00 noon

WHERE: Pace University downtown campus
1 Pace Plaza (on Park Row at Spruce St. opp. City Hall)
New York, NY

Press Registration not required, but if you call in advance we will have a security pass waiting for you.

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NOTE: Pace is one of the most active sites in this city wide education program, has a cross-section of students, and is easy to reach.

Sponsored by the Education Foundation of the American Banking Association as part of its second annual Get Smart About Credit Day, Miriam Solomon, Financial Education Specialist of Citigroup will kick off a series of at least 11 visits by Citigroup people to “College 101” classes at Pace University, teaching students how to use credit responsibly and build a positive payment history.

On National Get Smart About Credit Day employees from financial services institutions from across the country visit colleges, high schools, freshman orientations, youth groups, and continuing education classes to teach young people the do’s and don’ts of credit before they get their first credit card.

This year, Citigroup employees are volunteering to teach lessons on credit in 40 cities reaching over 5,000 young people across the U.S. The Citigroup family of companies includes Citibank, CitiFinancial, CitiMortgage, Primerica, Smith Barney and Travelers Life and Annuity.