The Journal News: Rockland hosts major test of carbon storage to fight climate change | LoHud.com

Environmental writer for The Journal News, Greg Clary, called upon Pace Energy and Climate Center head Jamie Van Nostrand for his expertise regarding an experimental process of burying carbon under ground.
(Left: Workers for the TriCarb Consortium for Carbon Sequestration drill test wells along the Garden State Parkway in Chestnut Ridge on April 6. Peter Carr/The Journal News).

Environmental writer for The Journal News, Greg Clary, called upon Pace Energy and Climate Center head Jamie Van Nostrand for his expertise regarding an experimental process of burying carbon under ground.

From The Journal News:

A science project in Rockland is expected to speed up next month, when geologists drill holes to see whether carbon dioxide can be injected into the earth to keep it from rising into the air and creating climate problems.

… The technology also raises questions, even from those who support the concept.

“This pushes CO2 underground — but who bears the responsibility later on if it leaks out?” said James Van Nostrand, executive director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center. “The technology isn’t new, but so far no one has made it work on a large scale.”

Van Nostrand called it “the opposite of extraction” and said landowner issues haven’t been sorted out as mineral rights were long ago.

The process sounds similar to hydrofracking because liquid or gas is injected into the earth, but carbon dioxide is different than the chemicals, sand and other materials used in hydrofracking to force out natural gas from underground reservoirs.

For carbon dioxide storage, the concern is more about ensuring it doesn’t leak back from deep underground.

Van Nostrand said carbon storage is one of the strategies the government is investing “a lot of money” in to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent by 2050, part of an international campaign to reduce the effects of air pollution.

… Van Nostrand said the U.S. needs to use every technology possible to change the current emission trends.”The bottom line is we still get 49 percent of our energy from coal,” he said. “We have to develop carbon capture and storage.”

To read the full article:

Rockland hosts major test of carbon storage to fight climate change | The Journal News | LoHud.com.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace Law prepares research on Adirondack forest preserve for probable New York State constitutional convention

Influential state conservation leaders came to a Pace Law School symposium recently to hear the latest wisdom regarding New York’s Constitutionally-protected forest preserve, vital information for a state Constitutional Convention that is likely to be held in the next few years. What made the presentation especially notable was that the experts were students.

WHITE PLAINS, NY, December 8, 2010 –Influential state conservation leaders came to a Pace Law School symposium recently to hear the latest wisdom regarding New York’s Constitutionally-protected forest preserve, vital information for a state Constitutional Convention that is likely to be held in the next few years. What made the presentation especially notable was that the experts were students.

The students’ work, presented December 1, was the culmination of the school’s “Research Seminar on Article XIV: ‘Forever Wild’ and Legal Issues of a Possible Constitutional Commission and Constitutional Convention.” Attendees included leaders at public policy groups and top officials from the Department of Environmental Conservation, including Kenneth Hamm of the general counsel’s office and Robert K. Davies, New York’s State Forester and director of the Division of Lands and Forests.

According to Professor Nicholas E. Robinson, who co-taught the seminar with adjunct Professor Philip Weinberg, this was the first review of the state’s Constitutional forest preserve in three decades. The research involved field trips to the Adirondacks and Catskills, as well as interviews with experts.

New York is required to hold a state ballot question in the next few years on whether to assemble a Constitutional Convention, Robinson said. Governor-elect Andrew Cuomo has endorsed doing this, and has announced that he would convene a Constitutional Commission to decide what issues a Convention would review.

Original Intent

The students argued in their presentations that the forest preserve is an essential state resource that must be protected, especially in light of concerns over climate change. The forest preserve is an important source of biodiversity; serves to sequester greenhouse gases; and is crucial to ensuring an adequate water supply.

Michael Friese, a third-year law student in the seminar, presented research on the legislative history of Article XIV, which he hopes will provide a valuable perspective for those involved in a possible upcoming Constitutional Convention.

“State officials should consider going back to the original intent of the article as developed by delegates in the 1894 convention, as opposed to chipping away at it as they’ve been doing over the past 100 years,” Friese said.

He was excited to know that his research and that of his classmates could be influential to policymakers.

“This is one of the reasons you come to Pace as an environmental student, so you can have opportunities to work with Professor Robinson or Professor Weinberg, who have influence not just locally but nationally as well,” he said.

Dave Gibson, a partner in Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve who was involved in the seminar, congratulated the students on their research. “Your research, writing and this seminar are going to inform and energize our work for a long time to come,” he said.

Greenest Communities in Westchester Announced at Pace

Grassroots Environmental Education, a non-profit organization, in partnership with the Pace University Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, announced today the results of a county-wide assessment of the efforts of towns and villages in Westchester County to address key environmental issues.

Green Star AwardsFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts:

Doug Wood, Grassroots Environmental Education (516) 883-0887 or (516) 423-6021

Cara Cea, Pace University, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

Greenest Communities in Westchester Win First Green Star Awards

142-Point Evaluation Addresses Local Efforts on Climate Change, Sustainability and Environmental Health

Pleasantville, NY, March 24, 2010 — Grassroots Environmental Education, a non-profit organization, in partnership with the Pace University Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, announced today the results of a county-wide assessment of the efforts of towns and villages in Westchester County to address key environmental issues.

Using a comprehensive checklist developed by Grassroots called “How Green Is My Town?”, over 100 Pace students conducted interviews with municipal, school and business officials of 43 Westchester municipalities from November through early March. The communities with the highest combined scores on 142 widely-accepted attributes of a sustainable and environmentally-aware community will receive Green Star Awards in recognition of their achievements at a ceremony today in Pleasantville.

The six towns receiving Green Star Awards are: Bronxville, Chappaqua, Katonah, Larchmont, White Plains and Yorktown. Survey results for these and all other communities in Westchester have been posted, with recommendations, online at www.HowGreenIsMyTown.org/westchester where the municipalities are rated but not ranked.

Electric vehicle parking?

Pace University is the first to complete a pilot program that Grassroots intends as a model for change on a national level. Students from universities in Nassau and Suffolk counties will be next to complete the assessments of their areas. The pilot program in Westchester was funded in part by Con Ed.

Questions included in the survey ranged from “Does your town provide special incentives for ‘green’ building projects?” to “Does your town recycle e-waste?” and “Does your town offer preferred parking for electric vehicles?”

“We were delighted to find so many of the towns in Westchester out in front on these issues,” says Patti Wood, Executive Director of Grassroots, “but there is always room for improvement. The goal of our program is to help communities share ideas and resources, and to find ways to move ahead on a green agenda even during these tough economic times.”

“Each sector of the community has a vital role to play in making a town truly green,” says Michelle Land, Director of the Pace Academy, and the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities. “When the local government, school system and business community are working together in a cooperative effort, the results can be innovative and significant.”

Ready-to-go ideas

Grassroots first announced the launch of their comprehensive, science-based web site, www.HowGreenIsMyTown.org last spring. The “greenweb” offers a resource for government agencies and school systems seeking to address key environmental issues, providing links to ready-to-go policies, program ideas and cost-effective solutions. It is designed to give local citizens and decision makers the tools they need to bring about change.

Patti Wood of Grassroots stressed that the evaluation scores for local towns are dynamic, and towns that adopt policies or take other steps to address key issues should contact Grassroots to have their scores updated. An annual review and update of the evaluations is planned. All of the questions, answers, as well as details of every town’s scores, are available online at the web site: www.HowGreenIsMyTown.org/westchester.

About Grassroots Environmental Education

Grassroots Environmental Education is a NY-based not-for-profit 501 (c) (3) organization founded in 2000. Grassroots is dedicated to educating the public about environmental toxins and their impact on human health. Through the production and distribution of science-based materials, the organization seeks to empower individuals to act as catalysts for positive change in their own communities.

About Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies

Pace University Academy for Applied Environmental Studies works with every academic unit of Pace University in a comprehensive program to increase interdisciplinary educational opportunities for students and faculty, expand collaborations and partnerships with external institutions and experts, and create research and advanced study programs on matters of community, national and global import. www.pace.edu/academy

Environmental Law Experts to Discuss Outcomes of 2009 Copenhagen Climate Summit, Tuesday, January 26

Environmental law experts will discuss the successes and shortcomings of the 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference during a January 26, 2010, Copenhagen Roundtable at Pace Law School. The panel of experts, which will include former New York Times science journalist Andrew Revkin, is unique for its diversity of professional backgrounds.

Contact: Crista Scaturro, (914) 422-4389, cscaturro@law.pace.edu

Cara Cea, (914) 773-3312, ccea@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY

PACE LAW SCHOOL HOSTS ROUNDTABLE ON COPENHAGEN SUMMIT

Hear from the experts who attended the climate negotiations on Tuesday, January 26

WHITE PLAINS, NY, January 22, 2010 – Environmental law experts will discuss the successes and shortcomings of the 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference during a January 26, 2010, Copenhagen Roundtable at Pace Law School. The panel of experts, which will include former New York Times science journalist Andrew Revkin, is unique for its diversity of professional backgrounds.

Many of the panel participants attended the Copenhagen Summit in capacities as representatives from media, government and NGOs. Each attended different events and returned with varying perspectives. The roundtable will bring these myriad experiences and points of view together in one place for a stimulating discussion about where the world is headed post-Copenhagen, and what challenges and opportunities lay ahead.

WHO (including, but not limited to):

• Nicholas A. Robinson, Pace University Professor on the Environment and Gilbert and Sarah Kerlin Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law

• James Van Nostrand, Executive Director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center

• Richard L. Ottinger, Dean Emeritus of Pace Law School, COP15 Delegate for the International Union for the Conservation of Nature

• Andrew C. Revkin, Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at Pace University’s Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, New York Times COP15 reporter

WHAT: Copenhagen (COP15) Roundtable

WHERE: Pace Law School (Preston Hall, Tudor Room), 78 North Broadway, White Plains, NY

WHEN: Tuesday, January 26, 2009, at 4:45 pm; reception to follow

Media admission by press pass. Check-in required.

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has over 7,000 alumni throughout the country and the world and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top three programs in environmental law. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus and offers the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law, Real Estate Law and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in environmental law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu

Academy for Applied Environmental Studies Appoints Science Journalist Andrew Revkin Senior Fellow

Andrew C. Revkin, one of the United States’ most eminent science reporters, is becoming Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at Pace University’s new interdisciplinary Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies.

Contact: Chris Cory, Pace Public Information, 212-346-1117, 212-979-8463, ccory@pace.edu

Andrew Revkin, eminent science journalist, to become Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at Pace University

Appointment to new Academy for Applied Environmental Studies builds on University’s environmental leadership

New York, NY, December 14, 2009 – Andrew C. Revkin, one of the United States’ most eminent science reporters, is becoming Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at Pace University’s new interdisciplinary Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies.

Revkin will be leaving The New York Times when he returns from his current assignment covering the Copenhagen summit on climate change, and will begin teaching when the spring term begins in late January.

“We are extremely pleased that Andy Revkin is joining what we believe is one of the strongest university environmental programs in the nation,” said Geoffrey Bracket Brackett, DPhil (Oxon.), the University’s Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs. “His intellectual expertise and ethical balance will make enormous contributions to helping the Pace Academy in its aim to be a global resource for policy development.”

The Pace Academy is a University-wide center with internationally known faculty members who concentrate on national and global environmental issues such as the water crisis and climate change.

Pace awarded Revkin an honorary doctorate in 2007.

Green expertise. Over the years Pace has become well known for environmental education. The Pace Law School’s environmental program is consistently ranked among the top three in the US. The law school’s Environmental Legal Clinic, co led by Professors Robert F. Kennedy Jr. and Karl Coplan, trains environmental lawyers who, while still students, have set national precedents in a number of cases involving the Hudson River. This fall Pace Law launched the first curriculum in the nation entirely dedicated to climate change, offered within the school’s Masters of Environmental Law (LLM) program.

Revkin will be joining a host of nationally-known environmentalists who are part of the Pace faculty and the Academy, Brackett said.

They include John Cronin, the Academy’s Senior Fellow for Environmental Policy, who first came to public attention as the Hudson Riverkeeper and now also directs the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries; Nicholas Robinson, University Professor for the Environment, one of the founders of international environmental law; Professor Robert Chapman, an environmental philosopher who directs the undergraduate Environmental Studies program and the Pace Institute for Environmental and Regional Studies; and Richard Schlesinger, an environmental toxicologist who oversees the Environmental Science BS and MS programs. Pace’s science curriculum is especially strong in issues underlying environmental assessment, policy, and communication.

In the last decade Pace University spearheaded formation of the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities, an organization of more than 50 campuses in the Hudson watershed that collaborates on environmental studies and teaching.

Copenhagen presence. In Copenhagen, the Pace presence includes the former US Congressman and dean emeritus of Pace Law School, Richard Ottinger, a delegate for the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, one of the largest global environmental nongovernmental organizations, who is blogging about the global climate change negotiations. Two Pace Law School Doctor of Juridical Science students are delegates, from the Marshall Islands and Pakistan, and a student in the school’s joint master’s program with the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies is serving as an observer.

Revkin published one of the first journalistic reports on global warming 21 years ago. His degree citation said “One of his specialties is revealing how slowly-building risks such as global warming and the loss of species could transform the planet, but in ways hard to perceive in the rush of daily experience.”

The citation added: “He has melded scientific information with coverage of the politics that influence both damage and prevention.” His first book, on the slain leader of a movement to protect the Amazon basin, was the basis of an HBO film, which won three Golden Globes and two Emmy awards. An amateur musician who performs on fiddle, guitar, mandolin and vocals in a country folk-blues band, his New York Times profile of a heavy-metal singer was the basis for the 2001 movie “Rock Star.”

Sustainability and population. Now, Revkin has said, he wants to think and write about “the role of journalism in the larger world of environmental communication – how information matters in terms of policy and behavior.” He is starting what will be his third book for adults, about the interlinked issues of sustainability and population, and finishing the second of two books for children on environmental issues. The first has the ironic title “The North Pole Was Here.”

A full description of Revkin’s journalistic career was published today by the Columbia Journalism Review.

For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook – Pace University News | Twitter @PaceUNews| Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Graduate of Pace Law & Yale’s Joint Program 1st Fellow of Center for Environmental Legal Studies

Pace Law School Center for Environmental Legal Studies (CELS) announces the first Center Fellowship and Sean T. Dixon ’09 as the first Research Fellow. The CELS is the heart of Pace Law School’s environmental programs, housing the core of the environmental faculty and many of Pace Law School’s academic and research programs, such as the Pace Energy and Climate Center and the Brazil-American Institute for Law and Environment.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Regina Pappalardo, Paw Law School, (914) 422-4268, rpappalardo@pace.edu

CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL LEGAL STUDIES ANNOUNCES 2009 PACE LAW GRAD FOR FIRST CENTER FELLOWSHIP

WHITE PLAINS, NY, November 18, 2009 – Pace Law School Center for Environmental Legal Studies (CELS) announces the first Center Fellowship and Sean T. Dixon ’09 as the first Research Fellow. The CELS is the heart of Pace Law School’s environmental programs, housing the core of the environmental faculty and many of Pace Law School’s academic and research programs, such as the Pace Energy and Climate Center and the Brazil-American Institute for Law and Environment.

A 2009 graduate of Pace Law School’s joint-degree program with the Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Dixon received his Juris Doctor (JD) from Pace, with a certificate in Environmental Law, and his Masters of Environmental Management (MEM) in climate change policy from Yale. As part of the Fellowship, Dixon is currently enrolled in the new Master of Laws (LLM) program in Climate Change Law at the Law School. He is working as a CELS researcher. Dixon is also assisting in the development of the National Environmental Moot Court problem for Pace Law School’s popular annual moot court competition. Also, in conjunction with several JD candidates, he is working on grant proposals and publications in the field of international environmental courts and the need for centralized resources for the burgeoning environmental judiciary. The newly launched Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies is collaborating with Dixon on several interdisciplinary projects and conferences such as the development of a comprehensive water policy for New York State and the development of a graduate-level environmental policy degree at Pace University. This spring, Dixon will also be working as a lecturer at Yale University teaching a course on ocean and marine resource management.

Before enrolling in the Pace Law/Yale University joint-degree program, Dixon received a BA from Boston University, double majoring in marine biology and earth sciences. Dixon spent time working at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA, and as fisheries observer on commercial fishing vessels in the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea. While in law school, he interned at Oceana, Inc., NRDC, and Trustees for Alaska. Dixon attended the 2007 annual meeting of the International Whaling Commission in Anchorage, Alaska, USA, and the 2008 4th Quadrennial International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) World Conservation Congress in Barcelona, Spain where he worked in several resolution contact groups and where he developed a resolution (in conjunction with two fellow students) on the need for stable conservation finance in an era of unstable economic markets. His Yale University master’s thesis was on the ability of US fisheries law to adapt to climate change, and his law school research focus is on the intersection of law, policy, and climate change in the field of coastal and marine resource management.

“We are proud of what Sean has accomplished in his career to date, and are delighted to have his expertise and talent in the CELS,” said Assistant Dean Alexandra Dapolito Dunn, director of CELS and Pace Law School’s environmental law programs. “Sean is the type of student who truly will change the world with his vision and capabilities.”

The Center for Environmental Legal Studies is the world-renowned leader of Pace Law School’s environmental law programs. Founded in 1976, Pace Law School has over 7,500 alumni throughout the country and the world. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus. With its environmental law program consistently ranked among the top three in the nation (US News & World Report), the school also offers the Master of Laws in Environmental Law, Real Estate Law and in Comparative Legal Studies and an SJD in Environmental Law. Pace is also the first law school in the nation to offer a course of study focused on Climate Change Law, which is included as a specialty “track” as part of its Master of Laws in Environmental Law. The Law School is part of a comprehensive, independent and diversified University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu

Pace Law School Experts Available for Comment on Environmental Topics Including Energy and Climate

Energy topics are making headlines with Obama saying time had run out to secure a climate deal at the Copenhagen environmental summit and his appointment of Washington-based venture capitalist Jonathan Silver to the Department of Energy to speed federal funding for alternative-energy companies and car makers. Experts in energy, climate and the environment at Pace Law School are available for comment.

EXPERT ADVISORY Contact: Regina Pappalardo, Paw Law School, (914) 422-4268, rpappalardo@pace.edu

PACE ENERGY AND CLIMATE EXPERTS AVAILABLE FOR COMMENT

Among them: • Delegate to the Copenhagen summit from the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, an organization of 75 countries, 106 governmental agencies, and over 850 non-governmental organizations.;

• Pioneer of international environmental law;

• Executive Director and Deputy Director of a major force for the “greening” of the power sector, the Pace Energy and Climate Center

WHITE PLAINS, NY, November 18, 2009 – Energy topics are making headlines with Obama saying time had run out to secure a climate deal at the Copenhagen environmental summit and his appointment of Washington-based venture capitalist Jonathan Silver to the Department of Energy to speed federal funding for alternative-energy companies and car makers. Experts in energy, climate and the environment at Pace Law School are available for comment.

Richard L. Ottinger, Dean Emeritus, founded the Pace Energy Project in 1987, the predecessor to the Pace Energy and Climate Center (PECC). Ottinger, a retired member of the U.S. House of Representatives, will be the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) delegate to the Copenhagen environmental summit in December. He taught in the Pace environmental law program, which is consistently ranked among the top three in the nation by US News and World Report; Pace is the first law school in the country to offer a course of study focused on climate change law as part of its Masters in Environmental Law. In his 16 years as a member of the House of Representatives, he authored a substantial body of energy and environmental laws and was one of the earliest environmentalists in Congress.

The renowned environmentalist Hunter Lovins considers Ottinger responsible for most of the legislation that now lets environmentalists do their work.

The Energy Project’s groundbreaking research from the early 1990s, The Environmental Cost of Electricity, highlighted the environmental and human health costs associated with its production and delivery from fossil- and nuclear-powered plants. This study led to the development of policies that placed non-emitting and renewable power alternatives on more equal footing with conventional energy options.

Ottinger can be reached at (914) 422-4121 or rottinger@law.pace.edu.

Nicholas A. Robinson, the first University Professor at Pace University, is an internationally-recognized architect of international environmental law, a founder of the highly-ranked environmental law program at Pace Law School and an innovator in training thousands of environmental lawyers around the world. Early in his career he served on the first legal advisory committee to the President’s Council on Environmental Quality under Nixon, advising on the implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act. He also drafted New York State’s Tidal Wetlands and Freshwater Wetlands Acts and the state’s Wild Bird Law. During the Cold War, he was appointed by five US presidents as a delegate to USA-USSR environmental law negotiations. He played a key role in creating the UN Charter for Nature.

Robinson founded the International Program of the Sierra Club after being elected to its Board of Directors and served as International Vice President. He was later named an Honorary Vice President of the Sierra Club. Robinson has long been a leader of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), an organization headquartered in Switzerland with members including 75 countries, 106 governmental agencies, and over 850 non-governmental organizations. In 2003 he founded the IUCN Academy of Environmental Law, a consortium that now includes more than 100 universities around the world that have environmental law programs (www.iucnael.org). His books have been translated and published in Chinese, Farsi, Portuguese, and Russian, and he has lectured by invitation at universities in 75 nations. With the Pace environmental law program’s first Master’s degree student, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., and the first Hudson Riverkeeper, John Cronin, Robinson organized Pace Law’s Environmental Litigation Clinic.

In the worlds of business and economics Robinson long served on the Board of Directors and chaired the World Environment Center (www.wec.org), an organization of 45 of the world’s major multinational corporations, and today he serves as an environmental advisor to the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. Robinson can be reached at (914) 422-4244 or nrobinson@law.pace.edu.

James M. Van Nostrand, Executive Director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center, PECC, came to Pace Law School with 22 years of experience in private practice representing energy clients in state regulatory proceedings in eight western states, as well as proceedings before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. His practice emphasized electricity and gas regulation, utility mergers and acquisitions, telecommunications, and administrative law. He was recognized by the Energy Bar Association as its 2007 State Regulatory Practitioner of the Year, and has been included for the last several years in “The Best Lawyers in America.” He has published and lectured widely on energy policy and renewable energy, along with capacity markets, utility rates, and utility mergers and acquisitions. Van Nostrand can be reached at (914)-442-4082 or jvannostrand@law.pace.edu.

Thomas G. Bourgeois, Deputy Director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center, has provided economic, financial analysis and database services to the center for more than 10 years. He is Co-Managing Director of the Northeast Regional Combined Heat and Power Applications Center (NERAC), a project of the US Department of Energy. Bourgeois has authored reports on issues of energy efficiency, renewable energy policy and regional economic development. He has supplied testimony as an expert witness on behalf of the Energy Project in proceedings before the Public Service Commission in New York and the Department of Public Utilities in New Jersey. Bourgeois can be reached at (914)-442-4013 or tbourgeois@law.pace.edu.

About The Pace Energy and Climate Center: Known throughout the region as “pragmatic environmentalists,” PECC during its twenty-two year history has developed a reputation as one of the nation’s leading sustainable energy research and advocacy organizations and a major force for the “greening” of the power sector. Its staff of twelve includes attorneys, economists, planners and scientists. Its mission is to reduce the environmental, social, and human health burdens of electricity production and consumption and to promote climate change solutions.

PECC offers legal assistance to individuals, institutions, organizations and governmental agencies involved in energy decisions. It provides analysis of the social and environmental costs and benefits of electricity and fuel production alternatives, including their impact on climate change; proposes market mechanisms and regulatory structures to stimulate investment in clean energy; and explores ways to break down regulatory and market barriers that add costs and delay implementation of clean energy technologies.

The Center was instrumental in the development and design of a potential model for a federal carbon reduction program, the Northeast Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), the nation’s first mandatory program to cap power sector greenhouse gas emissions, which serves as The Center also has extensive experience with Combined Heat and Power (CHP) and Distributed Generation (DG) and liquid biofuels for transportation and heating.

About Pace Law: Founded in 1976, Pace Law School has nearly 6,700 alumni throughout the country and the world. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus. The School also offers the Master of Laws in Environmental Law, Real Estate Law and in Comparative Legal Studies and an SJD in Environmental Law. www.law.pace.edu

About Pace University: Widely known for its diverse environmental teaching and research, for 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Wed, Oct 28 at 2:30 Event – Dan Bena, PepsiCo – Why It’s Good Business To Be Green

PepsiCo takes the “environmental challenge” and finds it’s good business to be green … for the company, its people and the world.

PepsiCo takes the “environmental challenge” and finds it’s good business to be green … for the company, its people and the world.

MEDIA ADVISORY Wednesday, October 28 at 2:30 PM, Pace University, NYC

FREE Event, OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

“Delivering Performance with Purpose: the PepsiCo Journey” Hear first-hand about PepsiCo’s commitment to leaving a positive imprint on society –– directly from Dan Bena, who plays a critical role in PepsiCo’s international sustainability efforts.

Who/Speaker: Dan Bena is currently the Director of Sustainability, Health, Safety, and Environment for the international division of PepsiCo, serving as a liaison between technical functions, government affairs, public policy, and field operations to develop key messaging related to sustainable development to internal and external stakeholder groups. This year he was appointed to the Steering Committee of the United Nations CEO Water Mandate, and also serves on the Mandate’s working group for Water as a Human Right. Dan chairs the Water Resources Committee of American Beverage Association, and has been active in the International Society of Beverage Technologists (ISBT), as an elected board member, founder and Chair of the Emerging Scientific Interests Subcommittee, and—most recently—founder and Co-chair of the Subcommittee for Sustainable Development. Bena also serves on the board-sponsored Public Health Committee of the Safe Water Network, which is a not-for-profit organization for which PepsiCo was a founding member, dedicated to advancing sustainable, community-level solutions to provide safe drinking water in developing economies.

When: Wednesday, October 28, 2009 at 2:30 pm

Where: Pace University, One Pace Plaza, Downtown New York City Campus (just East of City Hall), Multipurpose Room

About Performance with Purpose: PepsiCo’s commitment to sustainable growth is focused on generating healthy financial returns while giving back to communities the company serves. This includes meeting consumer needs for a broad array of choices for healthy, convenient and fun nourishment; reducing the company’s impact on the environment through water, energy and packaging initiatives; and supporting its employees through a diverse and inclusive culture that recruits and retains world-class talent.

Event Sponsor: The Center for Global Business Programs at Pace’s Lubin School of Business, whose mission is to enhance the global capabilities of students and faculty by providing high-quality academic and professional experiences, facilitating learning, and supporting applied research in the global environment.

Media RSVP: Samuella Becker, Pace University, Public Information, sbecker2@pace.edu or 212-346-1637 (office); 917-734-5172 (cell).

About Pace. For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Brazilian Governor to Speak about Climate Change and Sustainable Development, April 30 at Pace Law

Marcelo De Carvalho Miranda, Governor of Tocantins, Brazil, will speak about “Climate Change and Sustainable Development Politics” on Wednesday, April 30, at 11:00 a.m. in Classroom 101 on the Pace Law School campus, 78 North Broadway, White Plains, NY.

MEDIA ALERT

Contact: Jennifer Riekert
(914) 422-4128, jriekert@law.pace.edu

Cara Halstead Cea
(914) 906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu

Release: Immediate

Brazilian Governor to Speak about “Climate Change and Sustainable Development Politics” on April 30 at Pace Law School

WHITE PLAINS, NY (April 28, 2008) – Marcelo De Carvalho Miranda, Governor of Tocantins, Brazil, will speak about “Climate Change and Sustainable Development Politics” on Wednesday, April 30, at 11:00 a.m. in Classroom 101 on the Pace Law School campus, 78 North Broadway, White Plains, NY.

WHO: Marcelo De Carvalho Miranda, Governor of the Brazilian State of Tocantins

WHAT: Environmental Lecture: “Climate Change and Sustainable Development Politics”

WHEN: Wednesday, April 30 at 11:00 a.m.

WHERE: Classroom 101, Pace Law School, 78 North Broadway, White Plains, NY.

Governor Marcelo De Carvalho Miranda is coming to Pace Law School while he is in New York on a special mission to participate in “Brazil: 27 Countries, 01 Nation.” He will be joined by a partner from Menezes e Lopes Advogados, the Brazilian law firm that worked with Pace Law School to produce a report for a biofuels conference last summer.

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has nearly 6,500 alumni throughout the country and the world. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus. The School also offers the Master of Laws in Environmental Law, Real Estate Law and in Comparative Legal Studies and an SJD in environmental law. The School of Law is part of a comprehensive, independent, and diversified University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu.

Time to Get Individuals to Stop Polluting: Legal Expert to Speak April 17 at Pace Law

Professor Hope Babcock says that a significant percentage of the remaining environmental problems facing this country are caused by individual behavior like driving cars, disposing of used cell phones, thermometers, and fluorescent light bulbs in the trash, spraying pesticides on lawns and flowerbeds, and dumping waste oil down storm drains. The bad news is that “most efforts to control individual human sources of pollution have failed.”

Contact:
Cindy Tangorra, 914-422-4389, ctangorra@law.pace.edu
Or
Cara Halstead Cea, 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu
Photo Editors: Image of Babcock available (on request)

TIME MAY BE RIPE FOR GETTING MORE INDIVIDUALS TO STOP POLLUTING

Legal expert to argue for approach with more potential than regulations and incentives at Pace Law School Thursday, April 17

WHITE PLAINS, NY, March 6, 2008 – Professor Hope Babcock says that a significant percentage of the remaining environmental problems facing this country are caused by individual behavior like driving cars, disposing of used cell phones, thermometers, and fluorescent light bulbs in the trash, spraying pesticides on lawns and flowerbeds, and dumping waste oil down storm drains. The bad news is that “most efforts to control individual human sources of pollution have failed.”

The good news, however, is that the crisis of global climate change may be making the time right for efforts that will work.

Those efforts had better work, she warns, because “we are through achieving major gains in pollution abatement from traditional sources.”

Babcock will offer her insight on the current hot topic of global climate change Thursday, April 17, 2008, at 5:00 p.m. in a Pace Law School lecture in Classroom Building 101 on the Law School campus at 78 North Broadway in White Plains. The presentation is titled, “Global Climate Change: An Opportunity to Improve Individual Environmental Behavior.”

The former General Counsel to the National Audubon Society, Babcock teaches environmental and natural resources law at Georgetown University Law Center, where she also directs an environmental clinic. The lecture is Pace Law School’s fourteenth annual Lloyd K. Garrison Lecture on Environmental Law.

While there are many ways to change personal behavior, like command and control regulations and economic incentives, like emissions trading programs or subsidies, or disincentives, like taxes or fines, only changing individual and/or social norms holds out much promise, says Babcock.

A new environmental norm may emerge when there is congruence between an environmental crisis and heightened public awareness, what Climate Change Expert Michael Vandenbergh calls “a republican moment.” One such moment triggered by the environmental disasters of the late 1960s and early 1970s, produced widespread public support for a variety of initiatives leading to the environmental laws that we have today.

Today, Babcock thinks the crisis of global climate change may be triggering another potential republican moment. To create a new environmental norm of responsible environmental citizenship, she will argue that the heightened public awareness created by this crisis has to be broadened through public education and other means to target individual behavior.

Babcock taught environmental law at the University of Pennsylvania, Yale, Pace, Catholic, and Antioch law schools. Before joining Georgetown’s faculty, she was General Counsel to the National Audubon Society and Director of Audubon’s Public Lands and Waters Program, a Deputy Assistant at the U.S. Department of Interior, and practiced law in the District of Columbia. She served on the 1992 Clinton-Gore Transition Team for the Interior Department, as well as on various Environmental Protection Agency advisory committees and National Academy of Sciences committees. She is a former Chair of the Natural Resources Law Section of the American Association of Law Schools. She is a graduate of Yale Law School and Smith College.

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has nearly 6,500 alumni throughout the country and the world. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus. The School also offers the Master of Laws in Environmental Law and in Comparative Legal Studies and an SJD in environmental law. The School of Law is part of a comprehensive, independent, and diversified University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu.