Pace Events to Honor Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr

Pace University will celebrate the life and work of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at events on both its New York City and Pleasantville campuses this week.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY COMMEMORATES LEGACY OF DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. IN DOWNTOWN NEW YORK THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, AND PLEASANTVILLE FRIDAY, JANUARY 29

James McBride to discuss latest book.

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, January 27, 2010 – Pace University will celebrate the life and work of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at events on both its New York City and Pleasantville campuses this week.

The New York City campus presents an evening with author and jazz musician, James McBride who will present “Reflections on Martin Luther King, Jr.” Thursday, January 28, from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at 1 Pace Plaza (entrance on Spruce Street) in the Multipurpose Room. The program is free and open to the public.

In his latest book, “Song Yet Sung,” McBride, the author of “The Color of Water,” weaves the historical past and the present into a complex picture of slavery, freedom and perceptions of freedom. McBride will transport the audience through Maryland’s mid-1800’s slave economy; the urban chaos and violence of the 21st century; and Martin Luther King, Jr.’s historic 1963 march on Washington. Media admission by press pass. Welcoming remarks will be made by Stephen J. Friedman, President of Pace University. A book-signing and reception will follow McBride’s presentation.

The next day, Friday, January 29 on the University’s Pleasantville campus, the 10th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemoration Breakfast, this year called “Generation,” will be held.

Assistant professor of history at Pace, Durahn Taylor, Ph.D., will be the keynote speaker at this breakfast honoring the numerous battles for social justice and human rights that Dr. King and the Civil Rights generation fought and won. The Pace Inspirational Praise Ensemble will perform.

The breakfast will be held in the Kessel Student Center – Dining room A (entrance 3, 861 Bedford Road) from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Media admission by press pass. For more information, contact Cornell Craig, ccraig@pace.edu or call 914- 773- 3775.

About Pace University

For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Sept 17 – Constitution Day Lecture – “Civil Liberties, Surveillance and Terrorism” by Roger Newman

On Wed, Sept 17 the 2008 Constitution Day Celebration “Civil Liberties, Surveillance and Terrorism” Featuring Guest Lecturer Roger Newman will be held at Pace University’s New York City Campus.

Pace University – 2008 Constitution Day Celebration “Civil Liberties, Surveillance and Terrorism” Featuring Guest Lecturer Roger Newman, Pulitzer Prize Finalist and Scribes Book Award Winner Introduction by Pace President Stephen J. Friedman Free and Open to the Pace Community/General Public

When: Wednesday, September 17, 2008 at 12:30 pm

Where: Schimmel Lobby, Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, Pace University’s Downtown New York City Campus just East of City Hall. Entrance on Spruce St. between Park Row and Gold.

Directions: http://www.pace.edu/page.cfm?doc_id=154 Why: The U.S. Constitution was signed September 17, 1787. In 2004, U.S. Senator Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia successfully led an initiative to make September 17 a national holiday. Constitution Day was first celebrated in 2005.

Preview: Roger Newman will discuss freedom and technology in a time of fear against the commands of the Constitution … If the first casualty of war is truth, civil liberty is second. Panic leads the way, with such examples as the internment of American citizens of Japanese descent during World War II and McCarthyism purges during the Cold War. The reaction to 9/11 threatens to restrict civil liberties on a far greater scale and in ways we do not yet know. To an unparalleled extent, the government is monitoring and keeping records of our private communications. Wiretapping and other electronic surveillance of communication networks are now widespread. Even just walking on the street is often recorded. The dangers are obvious.

About Roger Newman: Newman’s biography of Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black won the Scribes Book Award and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. The New York Times called it “a giant book on a giant man” and President Clinton talked about it for years in the White House. PBS used it as the basis for one of the programs in its series last year on the history of the Supreme Court on which Newman also appeared several times. He is the editor-in-chief of a four-volume encyclopedia, The Constitution and Its Amendments, and co-author of Banned Films, a history of movie censorship. Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan, Jr., called Newman a scholar of first rank. Newman has written more than one hundred articles and book reviews, and lectured extensively across the country. He has appeared on C-Span, National Public Radio and even Entertainment Tonight, which used Banned Films as the basis of a week-long series. He teaches at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and is editor of the Yale Biographical Dictionary of American Law, which will be published next year.

Currently he is working on a book on President Clinton’s Supreme Court appointments.

Media Relations Contact: Samuella Becker sbecker2@pace.edu 212-346-1637 or 917-734-5172

Sponsored by the Office of the Provost

Colonial-Era Paternalism Still Hurts Blacks, Says Professor Malone in New Book on Race and Voting

That paternalistic view may be more enlightened than thinking blacks are “essentially different from, and thereby inherently inferior to, whites.” But despite the Civil Rights movement, the condescending blinders of racial paternalism have dominated “the logic of integration … from the 1960’s right up to the present,” argues Christopher Malone, a political scientist who is an associate professor at Pace University, in a new book.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts
Cara Halstead Cea, Pace University, (914)906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu
Sarah De Vos, Senior Marketing Manager, Routledge, 212-216-7824, sarah.devos@taylorandfrancis.com

Review copies may be requested from Sarah De Vos, above.

Photo editors — the cover of the book is a vivid, post-Civil War handbill showing a crowd of black people crowding to get through a door labeled “Polls.” The image is from the New York Historical Society (negative # 78876) and may be available from the society or Sarah De Vos.

COLONIAL-ERA PATERNALISM STILL HURTS BLACKS,
SAYS PACE UNIVERSITY POLITICAL SCIENTIST
IN NEW BOOK ON RACE AND VOTING

“Between Freedom and Bondage: Race, Party, and Voting Rights in the Antebellum North” published this month

NEW YORK, NY – “The mental, moral, and psychological characteristics found in blacks [are] to be overcome only under the watchful gaze of paternalistic whites.”

That paternalistic view may be more enlightened than thinking blacks are “essentially different from, and thereby inherently inferior to, whites.” But despite the Civil Rights movement, the condescending blinders of racial paternalism have dominated “the logic of integration … from the 1960’s right up to the present,” argues Christopher Malone, a political scientist who is an associate professor at Pace University, in a new book.

“Between Freedom and Bondage: Race, Party, and Voting Rights in the Antebellum North” (Routledge, 2007) puts an x-ray to the broader topic of the denial of basic rights by looking into the ways blacks obtained and lost the vote in four Northern states in the years before the Civil War.

Malone concludes that unequal treatment for blacks comes from a mix of racial belief systems, “racial conflict as an outgrowth of rapid economic and demographic change,” and “political actors [who] … prey on this racial conflict by arousing poorer white working classes.” The racial belief system still in operation, he finds, is paternalism, and it goes back further than most Americans may realize, to the early days of the republic.

Little-known struggles. Malone knows both North and South, having grown up in New Orleans and earned his PhD at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. A popular Pace teacher, he also is director of the Pforzheimer Honors College at Pace’s downtown New York campus.

His book begins with the 2006 reauthorization of the landmark Voting Rights Act first passed in 1965. His narrative then takes the reader back in time by connecting that legislation to the little-known struggles for African-Americans’ right to vote in the antebellum North.

Northerners may be surprised by his evidence that paternalism, dominant in New York State in the Revolutionary period, had receded there by the 1820s. Alexander Hamilton and his cohorts had been “willing to take a chance that blacks possessed the mental capabilities for many of the responsibilities of citizenship.” But at a state Constitutional Convention of 1821, one Samuel Young exemplified a widespread “transformation” when he bluntly said “The minds of blacks are not competent to vote. They are too degraded to estimate the value, or exercise with fidelity and discretion this important right.”

Joining scholars who refute the notion that expansion of the franchise in the U.S. has been steady and “inevitable,” Malone writes: “Nothing is ever inevitable when it comes to the basic rights in American democracy.”

In an epilogue, Malone returns to contemporary racial politics and argues that the unfinished quality of the “Two Reconstructions” – the post- Civil War era and the modern civil rights movement – can be better understood by grasping what happened for African Americans in the early years of the Republic.

Historic blue blood on modern ideas. In a pre-publication review Leon Wynter, author of “American Skin: Pop Culture, Big Business, and the End of White America,” notes that “The party names have evolved …. and even rotated over 300 years, but Malone still draws a straight sociopolitical line between the North’s original blue-blood, slave-holding revolutionaries of 1776 and today’s race politics of paternalism, on both sides of the ideological fence.”

Adds Frances Fox Piven, Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Sociology at the CUNY Graduate Center and author of numerous books on social movements and voting in the United States, “Malone shows that the basic democratic issue of who shall vote was intimately entwined with the role of race in the economy, in partisan competition, and ultimately in political culture.”

For 101 years Pace University has combined exceptional academics with professional experiences and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

National Conference on Present-Day Legacies of Slavery and Sisterhood at Pace Friday, Saturday

Pace University is hosting a two-day conference on Harriet Jacobs, the first American slave woman to write an autobiography.

MEDIA ALERT
Contacts: Christopher T. Cory, 212-346-1117, Cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu
Frank Lentini, 212-481-7000 ext. 3223, frankl@mbooth.com

PACE UNIVERSITY CONVENES MAJOR HARRIET JACOBS CONFERENCE

“The story of the centrality of slavery in American life remains largely untold.” — Jean Fagan Yellin

The Legacies of Slavery and Sisterhood: The Life and Work of Harriet Jacobs — To highlight that unheeded story, including its roots and its contemporary dimensions in the US and many places in the world, Pace University is hosting a two-day conference on Harriet Jacobs, the first American slave woman to write an autobiography. The conference also is expected to revise Jacobs’ place in American history and literature. It includes roundtable discussions, the world premiere of a play based on Jacobs’s life, a dramatic reading by stage and screen star Ruby Dee, and the presentation of 17 original research papers. One panel brings together Donna Brazile, one of the most powerful women in Washington with Mende Nazer, a former slave whose life mirrors that of Jacobs. Among the participants are historians, other scholars and journalists, including a two-time Pulitzer Prize winner. www.pace.edu/dyson/HarrietJacobsConf

Who (partial list):
• Jean Fagan Yellin (Keynoter), author of “Harriet Jacobs: A Life,” best known for now-classic editions of Jacobs’s narrative, “Incidents in the life of a Slave Girl: Written by Herself.”
• Donna Brazile, a leading political strategist whose ideas help shape the Democratic platform on race and the first African American woman to run a national election campaign (Gore-Lieberman 2000).
• Mende Nazer, a Nubian who was sold into slavery in Khartoum at age 12 and who made a break for freedom in London, later writing her memoir, “Slave.”
• David Reynolds, Professor of English at Baruch College and the Graduate School of the City University of New York and author of “John Brown, Abolitionist: The Man Who Killed Slavery, Sparked the Civil War, and Seeded Civil Rights” (2005).
• Ruby Dee, award-winning actress whose credits include Purlie Victorious, (written by her late husband Ossie Davis), A Raisin in the Sun, Payton Place and Do the Right Thing..

What When & Where
Junior Historian’s Lecture & Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl – A play adapted from Jacobs’s writings brought to life in a Literature to Life ® adaptation commissioned by the New York Historical Society performed by the American Place Theatre. Special preview for high school students. Thursday, Oct. 5th, 9:30 am
Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, Pace University, 1 Pace Plaza
Conference, including six panel discussions, two keynote addresses, and a dramatic reading by Ruby Dee. Friday, Oct. 6th, & Saturday, Oct. 7th, 8 am- 6 pm, Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, Pace University, 1 Pace Plaza
Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl – (Play)
FREE TO THE PUBLIC Friday, Oct. 6th, 8 pm,
Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, Pace University, 1 Pace Plaza

Why: By examining the works of the only literate slave woman whose papers are known to exist, the often overlooked centrality of slavery in American life can be brought into a sharper focus. But the conference is about much more than a woman who could write a passionate narrative of her life as a slave, for Harriet Jacobs became an abolitionist, an educator, a patriot who called for liberty for the oppressed everywhere.

Harriet Jacobs Conference, October 6-7, New York City campus

In a major effort to revise her place in American history and literature, Pace University will host a conference on Harriet Jacobs, the first American slave woman to write an autobiography, on its downtown New York City campus October 6-7.

Contacts:
Christopher T. Cory, Public Information, Pace, 212-346-1117
Frank Lentini, M. Booth and Associates, 212-481-7000

PACE UNIVERSITY PLANS HARRIET JACOBS CONFERENCE

Recasting Her Role as a Major Contributor to American
Literature and Black Activism

One of Four National Conferences in Six Weeks to Mark Pace Centennial

NEW YORK, NY, June 7, 2006 — In a major effort to revise her place in American history and literature, Pace University will host a conference on Harriet Jacobs, the first American slave woman to write an autobiography, on its downtown New York City campus October 6-7.
“This conference will emphasize Jacobs’s role as a major contributor to the black literary tradition, which she helped establish with her narrative,” said David A. Caputo, president of Pace. “Literary discoveries made at Pace have dispelled myths about her work, proving that she authored the most important antebellum autobiography by an African American woman, and in doing gave an irreplaceable picture of American culture.”

Drawing eminent historians and literary scholars from across the country, “The Legacies of Slavery and Sisterhood: The Life and Work of Harriet Jacobs” will include six panel discussions and a roundtable on the current implications of her writing and life. Actress Ruby Dee will give a reading from Jacobs’s harrowing account of her escape from slavery in 1842. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl: Written by Herself, first published pseudonymously in 1861. Jacobs hid herself in a three-foot-high crawl space above a storeroom, living there for seven years before fleeing the South.

For more information on the conference, which is open to the public but requires advance registration, visit www.pace.edu/dyson/HarrietJacobsConf

Authenticity Verified. Incidents was rescued from obscurity by a Pace professor, Jean Fagan Yellin, whose work solved the mystery of who actually wrote the book and what it is. For more than 125 years, Incidents was assumed to be a novel written by a white author. But Yellin discovered and published correspondence from Jacobs, proving Incidents was indeed “written by herself,” as its subtitle announces, and not by Lydia Maria Child, a white abolitionist writer whose authorship commentators had long assumed. In 1987, Professor Yellin published a classic edition of Incidents with Harvard University Press.

After fleeing the South, Jacobs became an abolitionist activist in the North. During the Civil War, she worked behind the Union lines, in Virginia establishing a school among the refugees from slavery. After Emancipation, she actively sought to reform conditions among the freed people, traveling to England to raise funds for black Savannah.

In 2004, Yellin published the widely acclaimed Harriet Jacobs: A Life. The biography won the prestigious Frederick Douglass Book Prize awarded by Yale University’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition, the first biography ever to do so, and also won the William Sanders Scarborough Prize of the Modern Language Association.

To this day, Jacobs is the only African American woman held in slavery whose papers are known to exist. To edit a two-volume collection of the papers, scheduled for publication by the University of North Carolina Press in 2007, Yellin has received grants from funders including the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Archives, the Ford Foundation and the Delmas Foundation. The Harriet Jacobs Papers consist of approximately 400 items, including writings by Jacobs, her brother John S. Jacobs, and her daughter Louisa Matilda Jacobs.

Jacobs’s spirit was as indomitable as her life was remarkable. She lived as a slave, a fugitive targeted for kidnapping, a writer, a reformer, a lecturer and an activist. She worked closely with abolitionists and early feminists, provided emergency relief, founded her free school for blacks in Alexandria, Virginia, and raised funds for the black community. Her reform and philanthropic efforts were acknowledged when she was named to the executive committee of the Women’s Loyal National League, headed by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, in 1864.
Scholars Celebrate Her Remarkable Life. The conference list of panel participants is a veritable who’s who of literary scholars and historians, including some of the nation’s foremost authorities on slavery and authors whose works have formed the basis of the recent public television series “Slavery and the Making of America.” “The Legacies of Slavery and Sisterhood: The Life and Work of Harriet Jacobs” will take place in Pace’s Michael Schimmel Theatre, starting at 9 a.m., October 6, with an opening keynote address by Professor Yellin. The actress Ruby Dee will conclude the conference with a reading from Harriet Jacobs’s writings.

Among Harriet Jacobs conference participants are:
• Nina Baym of the University of Illinois at Urbana and general editor of The Norton Anthology of American Literature.
• Ira Berlin of the University of Maryland and co-author of books including Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in Mainland North America (1999) and co-editor of Slavery in New York, a companion book to the exhibition at the New-York Historical Society.
• Frances Smith Foster of Emory University and co-editor of The Norton Anthology of African American Literature and The Oxford Companion to African American Literature.
• James Oliver Horton of George Washington University, Director of the Afro-American Communities Project of the National Museum of American History at the Smithsonian Institution, author of nine books including the companion book for the WNET PBS series “Slavery and the Making of America,” which aired in 2005.
• Nell Painter of Princeton University (retired), president-designate of the Southern Historical Association and the Organization of American Historians and author of Creating Black Americans.
• Arnold Rampersad of Stanford University, who has written acclaimed biographies of W.E.B. DuBois, Langston Hughes and Jackie Robinson and a memoir with Arthur Ashe.
This conference is one of four nationally significant conferences taking place at Pace within six weeks this fall. “Aftershock: Rethinking the Future Since September 11, 2001” takes place September 6-8 with keynotes by Lee Hamilton, vice chair of the federal Centennial Commission, historian Doris Kearns Goodwin and White House policy advisor David Gergen. The October 6-7 “slavery and sisterhood” conference is followed October 16-20 at the Pace Law School by a global gathering of lawyers and environmentalists analyzing recent progress and problems in enforcing environmental laws. A Founders Day symposium on the future of higher education in a global society is November 29.

“Slavery and Sisterhood” is part of a Pace Centennial lecture and performance series called “100 Conversations.” The Centennial also included a speech, in March, by former President Bill Clinton, and is proceeding with a yearlong volunteer initiative called “100 Opportunities for Service and Civic Engagement” and “Roll Back the Clock Day,” during which the Pace cafeterias will offer representative 1906 food items at 1906 prices.
About Pace University Celebrating its 100th anniversary in 2006, Pace is a private university in the New York metropolitan area with a growing national reputation for offering students opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement, international perspectives and measurable outcomes. It is one of the 10 founders of Project Pericles, developing education that encourages lifelong participation in democratic processes. Pace has campuses including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. The University enrolls over 14,000 students enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, and Pace Law School. For more information, visit the Pace University Website, pace.edu.

Black History Month Exhibit at Pace Features Photos and Artifacts from Horace Greeley’s Life

An exhibit highlighting the words and career of the man who founded the New York Tribune, fought for the abolition of slavery, and unsuccessfully ran for President against Ulysses S. Grant in 1872 opens Friday, February 3 in the library on Pace University’s Pleasantville, NY campus.

Contact
Cara Halstead Cea, Pace University
914-773-3312, cell 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu

EVER-RELEVANT HORACE GREELEY
TO BE ON EXHIBIT AT PACE UNIVERSITY FOR BLACK HISTORY MONTH

War and peace, “idlers and imbeciles.”

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, January 27, 2006 – The crusading newspaper publisher and politician Horace Greeley had a lot more to say than the phrase he’s most famous for, “Go West, young man.” For instance:

• “There never was a good war or a bad peace.”
• “A Constitutional denial to Black men … of Political Rights freely secured to White men is monstrously unjust and irrational.”
• “Most of us would fain be thought richer than we are. Thousands incur expenses that they are scarcely able to meet through fear of being thought stingy or penniless, when they might better confess their poverty and save their money.”

An exhibit highlighting the words and career of the man who founded the New York Tribune, fought for the abolition of slavery, and unsuccessfully ran for President against Ulysses S. Grant in 1872 opens Friday, February 3 in the library on Pace University’s Pleasantville, NY campus.

The exhibit is open to the public during regular library hours, 8:30 AM to 2 AM Monday through Friday, 9 AM to 7 PM on Saturday, and 10 AM to 2 AM on Sunday. The Mortola Library is reached through Entrance #2 at 861 Bedford Road.

Part of the University’s commemoration of Black History Month and its centennial, much of the display is expected to move to Pace’s downtown Manhattan campus in the spring.

The ladder Greeley mounted to prune trees at his country house in Chappaqua will be on display, along with campaign buttons, early photographs, political cartoons and a deathbed scene.

Opportunity. Pace has at least three coincidental connections to Greeley. The University’s motto is “Opportunitas,” Latin for opportunity, which Greeley often encouraged people to seize. The main building of the Pace campus in downtown Manhattan is on the site of Greeley’s Tribune building, and the university’s Pleasantville campus grew up on the site of the sanatorium where Greeley died.

The exhibit was researched and designed by co-curators Marilyn E. Weigold, PhD, professor of history and the Pace University historian, and Brian Jennings, a Pace instructional services librarian. Many items in the exhibit were loaned by the New Castle Historical Society, which is located in the Chappaqua home that Greeley once owned.

“Do not lounge in the city!” The exhibit includes the epigrams above and other still-relevant Greeleyisms on civic competency, voluntarism, business education, environmentalism, abolitionism, and advancing the cause of women.

In a famous speech praising hard, shrewd work, Greeley predicted that “any young man who, at the close of his first year of responsible, independent life, has saved something, and knows where to find it, will go on to competence; whereas, the young man who at the close of his first year has made nothing, and has saved nothing – I do not say in money, but who has made himself no better off – will almost certainly die a poor man….”

And oh yes. Greeley’s full exhortation about the west, in 1841, was: “Do not lounge in the cities! There is room and health in the country, away from the crowds of idlers and imbeciles. Go west, before you are fitted for no life but that of the factory.”

Celebrating its 100th anniversary in 2006, Pace is a private university in the New York Metropolitan area with a growing national reputation for offering students opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement, international perspectives and measurable outcomes. It is one of the ten founders of Project Pericles, developing education that encourages lifelong participation in democratic processes. Pace has campuses including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. The University enrolls over 14,000 students enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu.

Students from Local Schools and Pace to Read Winning Essays at MLK Commemoration

In honor of his inspirational vision and never-ending quest for social justice, Pace University is proud to sponsor its 6th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemoration Program on Friday, January 27, 2006 (snow date: Monday, January 30th). The program will begin at 9:00 a.m. and end at 12 Noon. Registration and check-in will begin at 8:30 a.m. outside of the main Dining Hall located inside the Kessel Campus Center.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact:
Cara Halstead Cea, Public Information, Pace University
914-773-3312 (Office), 914-906-9680 (Cell) chalstead@pace.edu

6TH ANNUAL DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. COMMEMORATION PROGRAM, FRIDAY, JANUARY 27

Students from Mahopac Middle School, Croton-Harmon High School and Pace University will read their winning essays

In honor of his inspirational vision and never-ending quest for social justice, Pace University is proud to sponsor its 6th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemoration Program on Friday, January 27, 2006 (snow date: Monday, January 30th). The program will begin at 9:00 a.m. and end at 12 Noon. Registration and check-in will begin at 8:30 a.m. outside of the main Dining Hall located inside the Kessel Campus Center.

WHEN: January 27, 2006, 9:00 AM — 12:00 PM
WHERE: Pace University’s Pleasantville campus, entrance 3, Kessel Campus Center, Dining Room A
WHO: This event is open to the public and Pace community.

PACE UNIVERSITY MLK ESSAY CONTEST 2006 WINNERS:
• Matt Eaton, Mahopac Middle School
• Lenna Stahl, Croton-Harmon High School
• Shirley Idumonyi, Pace University

PACE UNIVERSITY MLK EXCELLENCE IN SOCIAL JUSTICE AWARD WINNERS:
• Dr. Marilyn Jaffe-Ruiz, Lienhard School of Nursing, Pace University
• Megan DiChiara, Sophomore, School of Education, Pace University

This year’s MLK Commemoration program will once again feature a hearty, traditional southern-style breakfast, remarks by Pace University President David A. Caputo, and local area high school students and Pace University students will read their winning essays for Pace University’s 4th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Essay Contest.

The featured performance of the event will be “The Meeting,” a play based on a fictional meeting between Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. In this moving work, playwright Jeff Stetson imagines for us what a clandestine meeting might have been like between two of the most influential men of our time. This fictional meeting takes place in a shabby Harlem hotel room in February, 1965. Within a week, Malcolm will be assassinated and in three short years, Dr. King will also become martyred to the crusade for freedom. This play, performed by three men who also call their group The Meeting, sold out hundreds of performances in previous venues.

Founded in 1906, Pace University educates achievers who are engaged with critical issues both locally and globally. Known for its outcome-oriented environment that prepares students to succeed in a wide-range of professions, Pace has three campuses, including New York City (downtown and midtown Manhattan), Westchester (Pleasantville, Briarcliff, and the White Plains Graduate Center), and the Pace School of Law in White Plains. The Pace Hudson Valley Center is located in Orange County New York. A private metropolitan university, Pace enrolls more than 14,000 students in undergraduate, masters, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Ivan G. Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, and School of Education. Visit Pace University at www.pace.edu.

Pace University to Honor Winners of 3rd Annual Dr.Martin Luther King, Jr. Essay Contest

Readings from winning high school and middle-school student essays honoring Martin Luther King, Jr. will be featured, along with a film on the civil rights leader’s life, at a morning-long commemoration at Pace University’s Pleasantville Campus this Friday.

Contact:
Shanelle Henry Robinson, Director, Office of Diversity Programs, (914) 773-3775, shenry@pace.edu

NOTE: Texts of the winning essays will be available on request.

Pace University to honor winners of
3rd Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Essay Contest
in three-hour commemorative program Friday, January 28

Pleasantville, NY, January 24, 2005 — Readings from winning high school and middle-school student essays honoring Martin Luther King, Jr. will be featured, along with a film on the civil rights leader’s life, at a morning-long commemoration at Pace University’s Pleasantville Campus this Friday.

The 5th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemoration Program (snow date: Monday, January 31st) begins with registration and check in at 8:30 and runs until at 12 Noon at the Gottesman Dining Room located in the University’s Kessel Campus Center.

The Westchester and campus communities are invited to participate.

The program will feature remarks by Pace University President David A. Caputo as well as the readings by the winners of Pace’s 3rd Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. essay contest. Winners from local high schools will be joined by winners from the Pace student body.

The winners of the essay contest will be presented with Barnes and Noble gift cards and two tickets each to the upcoming Feb. 9 appearance of Dr. Maya Angelou in the Goldstein Fitness Center, Pleasantville Campus.

High school winners this year are both from Poughkeepsie High School: 1st place – Bernadette Orende and 2nd Place- Eric Baxter & Aysha Kahn.

Middle School winners were both from the A.B. Davis Middle School in Mt Vernon 1st place – Melissa Hyatt, 2nd Place – Michael Carter.

Also on the program is “King’s Dream,” an inspiring performance tribute to the life and teachings of the eminent civil rights leader. Songs, live narrative and powerful film footage reveal the historical roots and social implications that led to an era of social unrest and social progress in America during the turbulent sixties.

This year’s MLK Commemoration program will once again feature a hearty, traditional southern-style breakfast.

The commemoration and the essay contest are run by The Pace University Westchester Office of Diversity Programs (ODP) which aims to promote a productive educational and work environment that fosters and values equality, respect, human understanding, fairness and diversity.

A private university in the New York Metropolitan area, Pace has a growing national reputation for offering students opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. Approximately 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu

Space is limited. RSVPs required. Please call (914) 773-3351 to reserve a seat at the commemoration.

Maya Angelou to Celebrate Black History Month at Pace University

In celebration of Black History Month, Pace University will host Maya Angelou — poet, educator, historian, best-selling author, actress, playwright, civil-rights activist, producer and director — at 8:30 p.m. on Wednesday, February 9, 2005, in the Goldstein Fitness Center, Pleasantville Campus.

Contacts:
John Agnelli, Director of Student Development and Campus Activities, 914-773-3767, jagnelli@pace.edu

Rosemary Mercedes, Manager of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1637, Mobile: 914-424-3845, rmercedes@pace.edu

MAYA ANGELOU TO CELEBRATE BLACK HISTORY MONTH AT
PACE UNIVERSITY

An Evening with Maya Angelou

Pleasantville, NY, January 11, 2005 — In celebration of Black History Month, Pace University will host Maya Angelou — poet, educator, historian, best-selling author, actress, playwright, civil-rights activist, producer and director — at 8:30 p.m. on Wednesday, February 9, 2005, in the Goldstein Fitness Center, Pleasantville Campus.

This is Angelou’s only scheduled appearance in the New York metropolitan area during Black History Month. She will discuss “community playing a role in educating one another” and the importance of supporting leadership during turbulent times.

Angelou has authored 12 best-selling books, including “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” and her current best-seller, “A Song Flung Up to Heaven.” She recently published “Hallelujah! The Welcome Table,” a collection of memories and recipes that reveal cooking as another long time passion in her life.

Angelou has been awarded nearly 50 honorary degrees, the Presidential Medal for the Arts and selected as a member of the National Women’s Hall of Fame. She made history in 1993 when she became only the second poet in American history to write and recite original work at a Presidential Inauguration.

Tickets are available to the general public at a cost of $25 for general admission, $35 for reserved seating, and $65 for front row seats. Tickets must be purchased online at www.Pace.Musictoday.com.

University students and staff can buy tickets from the Student Development and Campus Activities office, Kessel Campus Center, Pleasantville campus. Tickets for Pace University students are $5; faculty and staff $10. There is a maximum of 2 tickets with each I.D.

A private university in the New York Metropolitan area, Pace has a growing national reputation for offering students opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. Approximately 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu

Pace Scholar Wins $100,000 Ford Foundation Grant to Finish Editing Papers by Fugitive Slave

Harriet Jacobs (1813-1897), the fugitive slave who wrote the landmark memoir “Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl: Written by Herself,” is the only African-American woman held in slavery whose papers are known to exist.

Contact Mary Horgan, Associate Director of Public Information, Pace University 914-923-2798 or (914) 424-3845 mhorgan@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY SCHOLAR JEAN FAGAN YELLIN
WINS $100,000 FORD FOUNDATION GRANT
TO FINISH EDITING PAPERS BY FUGITIVE SLAVE
WHOSE BOOK SHE HELPED MAKE A CLASSIC

Compilation on Harriet Jacobs
is expected to advance teaching and scholarship,
help rescue personal voice of slave women from oblivion.

NEW YORK, NY — January 27, 2004 –Harriet Jacobs (1813-1897), the fugitive slave who wrote the landmark memoir “Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl: Written by Herself,” is the only African-American woman held in slavery whose papers are known to exist.

Fifteen years ago, against the prevailing judgment, Jean Fagan Yellin, a Pace University professor of English, established that Jacobs’s book indeed was “written by herself,” as its subtitle announces, and not by Lydia Maria Child, a white abolitionist writer whose authorship commentators had long assumed. In 1988, Yellin published an edition of “Incidents” with Harvard University Press and the book soon became a classic, used in thousands of college and high school courses on American history and literature and in ethnic, women’s and American studies.

Now the Ford Foundation has awarded a grant of $100,000 to Yellin and her staff to support completion of a two-volume edition of Harriet Jacobs’s papers, which the University of North Carolina Press has contracted to publish.

The grant comes at a time when Yellin’s scholarship is being recognized in other ways. Now a Distinguished Professor Emerita at Pace, her biography of Jacobs, “Harriet Jacobs: A Life,” has been published this month by Basic Civitas Books. The January/February issue of “Humanities,” the bimonthly publication of the National Endowment for the Humanities, carries an article on the Jacobs papers and PBS will air a documentary featuring Harriet Jacobs in October 2004.

A voice for generations. “Histories cannot be written, nor films produced, nor curricula developed which express the historic pluralism of our national culture until the words and acts of African-American women held in slavery are heard,” Yellin said. “Without the Harriet Jacobs papers, millions of nineteenth-century African-American women would remain without a voice.”

David A. Caputo, the political scientist who is president of Pace, said, “Jean Yellin’s rigorous scholarship has helped change the perceptions of entire generations.”

He added: “Pace’s administrators and supporters, Jean Yellin’s faculty colleagues, and her many students over the years should feel honored to have played their roles in supporting her contributions. Her work has increased our understanding of history and thereby strengthened the basis for increasing opportunity in this country and around the world.”

Yellin was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize for “Women and Sisters: the Anti-Slavery Feminists in American Culture” (1990), and is the editor of several definitive editions of classic nineteenth century American texts including Harriet Beecher Stowe’s “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” as well as Jacobs’s “Incidents.”

“Incidents” is studied abroad as a major work of American literature, with translations in French, German, Portuguese and Japanese. In the U.S., “Books in Print” currently lists 18 editions of Jacobs’s narrative. Yellin’s 1987 Harvard University Press edition alone has sold more than 200,000 copies.

More information on the Harriet Jacobs Project is at www.harrietjacobspapers.org .

Genesis of the Papers project. Shortly after publishing the Harvard edition of “Incidents,” Yellin discovered a series of letters Jacobs had written from the South during the Civil War and began work on the biography. She soon learned that Jacobs was actively involved in reform movements before, during and after the Civil War, especially abolitionism, feminism, and southern Reconstruction. Both Jacobs’ brother and her daughter were movement activists: he lectured with Frederick Douglass, she with Susan B. Anthony.

The wide range of materials Yellin turned up inspired her to undertake the “Papers” project. In 1995, she received a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for College Teachers, and more recently the papers project has received additional NEH funding and has been named a “We the People Project.” Other funding has come from Pace University, the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, the University of North Carolina Press, the UNC Center for the Study of the American South, and the UNC Libraries. The National Historical Publications and Records Commission has endorsed it.

The collection now encompasses approximately 600 items, housed in various archives in the U.S. and England. The new funds will pay for the remaining cataloguing and annotating, scheduled for completion in 2005.

“His”tory Lesson. The staff includes Kate Culkin, associate editor in residence at Pace, and Joseph Thomas, associate dean of Caldwell College, who is advisory editor. Culkin said, “The knowledge of Jacobs’s life and work, which the Harriet Jacobs Papers will dramatically enhance, enriches our understanding of gender, identity, pluralism and social change. It will foster new curriculums that illustrate minority women as academic subjects, students, teachers, citizens and activists.”

According to Yellin, the papers demonstrate that “antislavery discourse was not all about race and slavery, but also about identity and gender; and that feminist discourse was not all about sexuality and gender, but also about race and slavery. They excavate historic grassroots networks for social change, displaying the connections and disjunctions between black and white reformers and between race and gender reformers.”

“This story is central in our history and culture; it is the story of struggle for human fulfillment that we continue to address in our lives today.”

Less hearsay, more scholarship. The availability of the papers promises a constructive change in several academic disciplines. Publication of the papers will empower faculty members across the country, who have been unable to guide students responsibly into research areas that lacked basic primary materials, to encourage the study of nineteenth-century women of color. It also is likely to inspire young scholars to undertake such studies.

Yellin said, “This will encourage students of color at every level to enter a history in which they have been absent except by hearsay.”

Yellin and the project are affiliated with Pace’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, which offers majors in the humanities and has primary responsibility for the general education (core curriculum) of all baccalaureate students at the University. The project is affiliated most closely with the publishing program and with the English department, in which Yellin taught for many years. It has strong ties to the history department and the University’s Pforzheimer Honors College, which have supplied most of the Pace student interns who have worked on the papers. The project also has attracted eager graduate students from other campuses.

Yellin’s work on Jacobs is particularly relevant to Pace and its motto of “opportunitas.” The comprehensive, independent university is committed to opportunity, teaching and learning, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. Pace has eight campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school) and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart Airport near Newburgh, N. Y. More than 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. (www.pace.edu)