NEWS RELEASE: The Confucius Institute at Pace University to Hold Open House and Chinese Cultural Day

On Friday April 29, 2011 The Confucius Institute at Pace University (Pace CI) will hold an open house and Chinese cultural day as well as a celebration on the occasion of the 2nd Anniversary of the Institute.

NEW YORK, NY, April 26, 2011 – On Friday April 29, 2011 The Confucius Institute at Pace University (Pace CI) will hold an open house and Chinese cultural day as well as a celebration on the occasion of the 2nd Anniversary of the Institute.  The event, which will take place in the Student Union at 1 Pace Plaza between 12 Noon and 4 PM, will feature tours of the Institute’s headquarters, a presentation on Pace CI’s programs, cultural demonstrations, lunch and a cake cutting to celebrate the CI’s 2nd year birthday.

The afternoon will be filled with hands-on workshops and cultural activities.  World renowned expert, Dr. Bin Zhou, will lead an interactive demonstration of the ancient art of calligraphy.  Participants will be able to learn Chinese calligraphy, experience living Chinese culture, and enjoy the beauty of Chinese characters.  Master Xueming Bao will lead a demonstration of Qi Gong, an exercise regimen that is a full body and breathing workout.

At the event, Pace CI staff members will also introduce the Confucius Institute’s newest program – Chinese Corner.  The Chinese Corner is a weekly Chinese Language and Cultural Gathering that allows non-native Chinese speakers to practice their language skills with native Chinese speakers in a friendly and welcoming environment.  The afternoon will conclude with a celebration of Pace CI’s 2nd Year Anniversary and a cake cutting.

Distinguished guests from the Consulate General of The People’s Republic of China in New York, the New York City Council, Manhattan’s Chinatown, and Pace University will be in attendance.

For more information about this event please contact the Confucius Institute at Pace University at ci@pace.edu or at 212-346-1880.

About the Confucius Institute at Pace University

Strategically located at the financial, civic, and cultural center of Manhattan, The Confucius Institute at Pace University is the first university-based institute of its kind in New York City. Founded in partnership with China’s Phoenix Publishing and Media Group, Pace’s Confucius Institute integrates pedagogical, scholarly, and professional expertise to promote the learning of Chinese language and culture and to facilitate cross-cultural understanding between people in the United States and China. 

About Pace

For 105 years, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Pace picked to lead summer walking tour of successful literacy efforts in Chinatown, Lower East Side

Pace University has been competitively chosen to present a program explaining ways to increase literacy in Chinatown and the Lower East Side of Manhattan that will take place during the world’s largest gathering of volunteer leaders from the nonprofit, corporate and government sectors.

Contacts: Chris Cory, Pace, 212-346-1117, 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

Ashley Etienne, Corporation for National and Community Service, 202-606-6944, aetienne@cns.gov

For immediate release

Photo: Pace sophomore and CVM AmeriCorps member Miki Tamura working with a class of beginner English students at the Chinese American Planning Council. 300 DPI version available

Pace picked to lead summer walking tour of successful literacy efforts in Chinatown and Lower East Side

Chinese American Planning Council, Jumpstart for Young Children, Community and Volunteer Mobilization AmeriCorps program, Our Lady of Sorrows will help host attendees at world’s largest conference on volunteering and service

New York, NY, April 5, 2010 — Pace University has been competitively chosen to present a program explaining ways to increase literacy in Chinatown and the Lower East Side of Manhattan that will take place during the world’s largest gathering of volunteer leaders from the nonprofit, corporate and government sectors.

The gathering is this summer’s annual National Conference on Volunteering and Service, being held this year in New York City.

Pace students serving as AmeriCorps members in these neighborhoods will conduct a walking tour of community literacy programs during the conference, which will take place from June 28 to 30.

The conference is expected to draw more than 6,000 participants, who will hear speeches by Arne Duncan, the Obama administration’s Secretary of Education, Aaron S. Williams, the director of the Peace Corps, and Harris Wofford, an early Peace Corps executive who later served as a US Senator.

Challenge of immigration

Conferees who come to neighborhoods near Pace’s downtown Manhattan campus will learn about the importance of the area’s social history and its literacy needs, as well as how the University’s Community and Volunteer Mobilization (CVM) and Jumpstart for Young Children programs integrate students and volunteers into literacy initiatives.

The group will tour organizations in Chinatown and the Lower East Side with which Pace partners, including the Chinese American Planning Council and Our Lady of Sorrows School.

About 80 Pace students each year learn while serving in both Jumpstart and CVM AmeriCorps, engaging the community in literacy and education initiatives for children and adults.

“New York City remains a magnet for immigration and literacy is a perennial challenge,” said Kathryn Casey Quigley, Program Director of CVM AmeriCorps.

“Our community partners, students and staff members have learned a lot about what works. We think it’s important to share these lessons. At the same time, we’ll explore the social history of these storied communities — and be sure to find a great restaurant.”

Both AmeriCorps programs are based at Pace’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, in its Center for Undergraduate Research Experiences.

Notables likely to attend

More information about the community programs is available by contacting LunYan Tom, the Site Manager for Jumpstart at Pace, 212-346-1874 or ltom@pace.edu.

The national conference is convened by the Points of Light Institute and the Corporation for National and Community Service, and locally by NYC Service and New Yorkers Volunteer. Last year’s conference, held in San Francisco, was attended by First Lady Michelle Obama, California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, California First Lady Maria Shriver, Matthew McConaughey, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Arianna Huffington and Jon Bon Jovi. A similar roster is expected this year.

About Pace University

For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

About CVM AmeriCorps

CVM AmeriCorps offers individuals the opportunity to address literacy and education issues in the Lower Manhattan and Chinatown communities. AmeriCorps members commit to one year of service at schools, and community-based and non-profit organizations.

About Jumpstart for Young Children

Jumpstart knows that every child is born with the potential to succeed in school and in life. We also know that the foundation for that success is established in the early years, before a child enters kindergarten. To cultivate a child’s literacy, language and social skills, Jumpstart brings college students and community volunteers together with preschool children in low-income communities for year-long, individualized tutoring and mentoring. Since its beginning in 1993, Jumpstart has empowered adult mentors to impact over 75,000 children across America. During this school year, nearly 300 trained Jumpstart college student Corps members are spending over 75,000 hours at 27 preschools with 1,100 NYC preschool children, preparing them for school and life-long success.

Pace High School Opens September 7, 2004

One of the newest of the city’s small, public secondary schools will blossom downtown this fall in Chinatown.

Contact
Christopher T. Cory, Director of Public Information
212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

BACK TO SCHOOL:

Pace High School Opens September 7, 2004
Will be distinguished by unusually high level of involvement by a major university

New York, NY, September 3, 2004 – One of the newest of the city’s small, public secondary schools will blossom downtown this fall in Chinatown.

Starting on September 7 with 111 students and building each year to an eventual 400, Pace High School, created in partnership with Pace University and New York City’s public School District Region 9, will be located in a separate wing of MS 131 on Hester Street between Eldridge and Forsyth Streets. MS 131 will remain open and continue to serve its current population. MS 131 and Pace High School will share a gym, blacktop play area, auditorium and lunchrooms.

Students in Pace High will be offered an unusually high level of involvement with a major national university.

Pace’s downtown Manhattan campus is only ten blocks away. Pace identification badges will admit Pace High students to the University’s computing system and e-mail, library, student union, gym and cafeteria.

An “early college” program will give tuition-free access to Pace classes to as many as 40 juniors and seniors who finish their state diploma requirements. And Pace is guaranteeing up to five full college scholarships at Pace to qualified graduates.

“When we say Pace is committed to lower Manhattan, we mean it,” said Pace President David A. Caputo “We want to show that universities can play a major role in helping young people and their communities prosper through fine public schools.”

Added Yvette Sy, the New York City public school system’s Principal for Pace High School, “Working with Pace to develop this school has made us more certain than ever that this university and its students will add tremendous resources and reach to this exciting new school’s offerings to students.”

The new high school builds on Pace’s work with teachers and students at MS131 going back 17 years. Said Jan McDonald, dean of the Pace School of Education, “Pace teachers have been sought-after for years by schools in the City and Westchester. Having a school in which to prove and improve our methods will add to the value of the teachers we produce for schools everywhere.”

WHAT MAKES PACE HIGH SCHOOL SPECIAL?
BACKGROUND ON PACE HIGH SCHOOL

The school’s mission is “the creation of a student-centered, inquiry-based, enriched educational environment in which serious expectations of high academic achievements are anticipated for every student. Central to our role as a school is that every student is known well and appreciated for his/her talents and contributions to our learning community. To this end, school practices are tailored to the individual needs of students so that their ambitious academic goals can be realized. PACE High School utilizes the resources of Pace University to provide a quality academic experience for our students.”

The new school will receive $400,000 in start up funds over four years from New Visions for Public Schools, an organization funded by $30 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Carnegie foundation (Carnegie Corporation of New York), and George Soros’s Open Society Institute. It will receive an additional $160,000 in initial funds from the City’s Department of Education and have a normal budget from the City.
Pace will donate in-kind services worth more than $1,000,000 over four years, and the scholarships Pace is guaranteeing for qualified students could be worth as much as $400,000 more.

A foundational concept focuses on the development of a resume, not just a transcript, placing all its juniors and seniors in community-based and/or corporate internships said Art Maloney, School of Education Chair. , Pace High students will have to demonstrate meaningful contributions to the community outside their school in order to graduate

Placement assistance will capitalize on Pace’s proximity to the city’s financial and government centers and will come from the Pace Office of Co-op and Career Services. The office operates the metropolitan area’s largest voluntary co-op and internship program. Pace High School students will also benefit from the involvement of other Pace University units including the School of Computer Science and Information Systems, the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, the Division of Information Technology, the Center for Teaching, Learning and Technology, the Offices of Institutional Research and Philanthropy and Pace’s Center for Downtown New York.

Pace High will grade with more than tests, incorporating “public performance assessments” before faculty panels, assessment exhibitions and the use of portfolios to assess the performance of both students and teachers. It will be one of the few city high schools to require competence in two languages for graduation (for most students, this will mean Mandarin or Spanish and English).

It will have extensive programs for involving parents, offering adult education for their own advancement (many courses will be in English as a Second Language and the use of information technology), plus activities for helping their children like seminars on financing college. A special College Counseling program will provide special training for faculty, students and parents on both getting into college and finding the necessary resources.

Pace High draws on proven best practices developed by the Coalition of Essential Schools based at Brown University under Theodore Sizer and the small schools that Deborah Meier pioneered in the Central Park East community of Manhattan’s Spanish Harlem. The Education School’s programs preparing New York City Teaching Fellows and urban teachers in the Teach for America program are among the city’s five largest, and the university has a 20-year-plus relationship with MS 131, regularly providing after-school tutoring and education students.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university committed to opportunity, teaching and learning, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. It has eight campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. More than 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu.

Pace University School of Education is taking lead in creation of new Pace High in Chinatown

Pace High School, one of the 70 new small public schools opening in New York City this fall, has an unusual dimension: it will introduce its 100 new freshman to each other and their new school on Pace University’s suburban campus in Pleasantville, beginning Monday July 12.

CONTACT
Mary Horgan 914-923-2798 or 914-424-3845 mhorgan@pace.edu

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Pace University School of Education is taking lead
in creation of new Pace High in Chinatown
SUBURBAN WEEK IN WESTCHESTER TO BE LAUNCH PAD
FOR NEW-VISION HIGH SCHOOL IN NEW YORK CITY

Pleasantville, NY, July 12, 2004 – Pace High School, one of the 70 new small public schools opening in New York City this fall, has an unusual dimension: it will introduce its 100 new freshman to each other and their new school on Pace University’s suburban campus in Pleasantville, beginning Monday July 12.

The weeklong program, “First Summer,” is designed to immerse the new students in a University setting including library and computer services training, raising sights and setting a high level of expectations from the very beginning.

“The school had over 800 applications from all over New York City. The initial 100 were chosen at random by the Board of Education,” says Arthur Maloney, Ed.D. who headed the team that created the proposal for the New Vision school and is a Professor and Chair of the Pace University School of Education.

The university involvement will continue after the Westchester week. Pace High students will experience a rigorous academic curriculum, personal relations with teachers, and high level of involvement with a major national university. They will have access to the University’s computing system and e-mail. Pace’s downtown Manhattan campus is only ten blocks away from the school’s location in Chinatown, and Pace identification badges will admit Pace High students to the Pace library, student union, gym and cafeteria. Juniors and seniors will be able to attend lectures, activities and special events.

“The University and its students will add superb resources and stimulation and boost the opportunities of our students,” said Yvette Sy, the Principal and the New York City public school system’s Project Director for Pace High School.

Committed to rebuilding downtown New York and providing quality education for its citizens, Pace President David A. Caputo said, “We want to show that universities can play a major role in creating the fine schools that help young people and their communities prosper.”

Pace High School students are getting the added value of involvement from a university school of education which trains teachers in both of Pace’s major locations, Westchester and downtown New York. Working with the school’s regular New York teachers, up to eight graduate teacher interns and as many as three school administration interns will be on site for the entire school year, subsidized by Pace. An intensive teacher training cohort program will support undergraduate student teachers from Pace, who will stay in the school as a team for three or four years. At the same time, Pace SOE professors will work with Pace High teachers on curriculum and evaluation methods in mathematics, science, humanities, modern languages and technology.

“Helping to design and run a school where we can prove and improve our teaching methods will add to the value of the teachers we send out to schools everywhere,” said Jan McDonald, dean of the Pace School of Education.
“The great thing about a summer program like this,” added McDonald “is that it will help begin to build relationships with our new students and teachers.”

BACKGROUND ON PACE HIGH SCHOOL
Pace High will be “extraordinary but not elite,” in Maloney’s phrase.
A collaboration between Pace University’s School of Education and New York City’s School Region 9, the school will be located in a separate wing of MS 131 on Hester Street between Eldridge and Fosyth Streets. MS 131 will continue to serve its current population, sharing a gym, blacktop play area, auditorium and lunchrooms with the new school.

The Pace High School proposal was one of six selected for New Visions funding out of 60 submitted in Region 9, an area covering all of Lower Manhattan as well as parts of the Upper East Side and a small section of the Bronx.

The new school will receive $400,000 in start up funds over four years from New Visions for Public Schools, an organization funded by $30 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Carnegie foundation (Carnegie Corporation of New York), and George Soros’s Open Society Institute. It will receive an additional $160,000 in initial funds from the City’s Department of Education and have a normal budget from the City.
Pace will donate in-kind services worth more than $1,000,000 over four years, and the scholarships Pace is guaranteeing for qualified students could be worth as much as $400,000 more.

The school’s mission is “the creation of a student-centered, inquiry-based, enriched educational environment in which serious expectations of high academic achievements are anticipated for every student. Central to our role as a school is that every student is known well and appreciated for his/her talents and contributions to our learning community. To this end, school practices are tailored to the individual needs of students so that their ambitious academic goals can be realized. PACE High School utilizes the resources of Pace University to provide a quality academic experience for our students.”

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university committed to opportunity, teaching and learning, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. It is one of the ten founders of Project Pericles, developing education that instills lifelong participation in democratic processes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. More than 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu.

Pace to Help Start Innovative High School in Chinatown

One of the newest of the city’s small, public secondary schools will blossom downtown this fall in Chinatown.

Contact
Christopher T. Cory, Director of Public Information
212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu
For immediate release
PHOTO EDITORS – digitized photo is available of the building,
which has distinctive architecture

PACE UNIVERSITY LEADS
CREATION OF NEW HIGH SCHOOL
IN CHINATOWN

School will be distinguished by unusually high level of university involvement

New York, NY, March 16, 2004 – One of the newest of the city’s small, public secondary schools will blossom downtown this fall in Chinatown.

The new Pace High School is a collaboration between Pace University’s School of Education and New York City’s School Region 9. Starting with 100 students and building to 400, the school will be located in a separate wing of MS 131 on Hester Street between Eldridge and Fosyth Streets. MS 131 will continue to serve its current population, sharing a gym, blacktop play area, auditorium and lunchrooms with the new school.

Pace High is one of the new small secondary schools announced last week by Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Schools Chancellor Joel Klein.

Its students will experience a rigorous academic curriculum, personal relations with teachers, and an unusually high level of involvement with a major national university.

They will have access to the University’s computing system and e-mail. Pace’s downtown Manhattan campus is only ten blocks away, and Pace identification badges will admit Pace High students to the library, student union, gym and cafeteria. Juniors and seniors will be able to attend lectures, activities and special events.

An “early college” program will give tuition-free access to Pace classes to as many as 40 juniors and seniors who finish their state diploma requirements. And Pace is guaranteeing a substantial number of full Pace scholarships to qualified graduates.

“Superb” resources. “When we say Pace is committed to lower Manhattan, we mean it in many ways,” said Pace President David A. Caputo. “We want to show that universities can play a major role in creating the fine schools that help young people and their communities prosper.”

Added Yvette Sy, the New York City public school system’s Project Director for Pace High School, “working on this school with Pace has made us surer than ever that the university and its students will add superb resources and stimulation and boost the opportunities of our students.”

Jan McDonald, dean of the Pace school of Education, noted that “Pace teachers have been sought-after for years by schools in the City and Westchester. Helping design and run a school where we can prove and improve our methods will add to the value of the teachers we send out to schools everywhere.”

High teacher ratio. Pace High students will get attention from a higher ratio of student teachers and interns than students in almost any public school in New York. Working with the school’s regular New York teachers, up to eight graduate teacher interns and as many as three school administration interns will be on site for the entire school year, subsidized by Pace. A cohort of undergraduate student teachers also will stay in the school as a team for three to four years, a teacher-training technique that the Pace education school has successfully developed in other schools.

Discounted educational benefits will encourage the teachers to model life long learning for parents, staff and students. Pace High faculty members who mentor Pace student teachers will get vouchers for tuition-free Pace courses, and all faculty members will get tuition reductions of nearly 50% for Pace graduate degrees in Educational Technology, Early Childhood Education, Literacy, School Leadership and Special Education, and courses in Bilingual, Middle Level and Gifted Education. At the same time, Pace professors will work with Pace High teachers on curriculums and evaluation methods in mathematics, science, humanities, modern languages and technology.

Westchester summer program. The school is one of the city’s few small public schools with its own summer preparatory program — a week for new students on Pace’s suburban campus in Briarcliff, New York that will be focused on organizational and time management skills. Staff members will have their own weeklong series of training sessions and workshops.

While many of the city’s new small schools appeal to students with a special interest, this one will take a cross section. Open to students from anywhere in New York City, it is expected to draw many pupils from the student body of MS 131, where family poverty makes more than 97 percent of the students eligible for free lunches. Only four other schools in the entire city have so many poor students.

Pace High will be “extraordinary but not elite” says Arthur Maloney, Ed.D., who headed the team that created the proposal for the school and is Assistant Chair of the Pace University School of Education.

Resume-building. Among its long list of features, the school will help students build a resume, not just a transcript, placing all its juniors and seniors in community-based and/or corporate internships. Like Pace students as of this year, to graduate, Pace High students will have to demonstrate meaningful contributions to the community outside the school. Placement assistance will capitalize on Pace’s proximity to the city’s financial and government centers, and on the skills of Pace’s Office of Co-op and Career Services. The office operates the metropolitan area’s largest voluntary co-op and internship program.

Pace High School students also will benefit from the involvement of other Pace University units including the School of Computer Science and Information Systems; the Center for Teaching, Learning and Technology; the Division of Information Technology; the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences; the Offices of Institutional Research and Philanthropy; and the Center for Downtown New York.

Pace High will grade with more than tests, incorporating “public performance assessments” before faculty panels, assessment exhibitions and the use of portfolios to assess the performance of both students and teachers. It will be one of the few city high schools to require competence in two languages for graduation. For most students, this will mean Mandarin or Spanish and English.

And the school will have extensive programs for involving parents, offering adult education courses for their own advancement such as English as a Second Language and information technology, plus activities for helping their children. A special College Counseling program will provide training for faculty members, students and parents on both getting into college and finding the necessary resources.

Gates, Carnegie and Soros funding. The new school will receive $400,000 in start up funds over four years from New Visions for Public Schools, an organization funded by $30 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Carnegie foundation (Carnegie Corporation of New York), and George Soros’s Open Society Institute. It will receive an additional $160,000 in initial funds from the City’s Department of Education and have a normal budget from the City. Pace will donate in-kind services worth more than $1,000,000 over four years, and the scholarships Pace is guaranteeing for qualified students could be worth as much as $400,000 more.

The Pace High School proposal was one of six selected for New Visions funding out of 60 submitted in Region 9, an area covering all of Lower Manhattan as well as parts of the upper east side and a small section of the Bronx.

The transformation of city high schools of which it is a part also has the collaboration of the United Federation of Teachers and the Council of Supervisors and Administrators.

Proven ideas. Pace High draws on proven best practices developed by the Coalition of Essential Schools based at Brown University under Theodore Sizer, and the small schools that Deborah Meier pioneered in the Central Park East community of Manhattan’s Spanish Harlem. The Pace Education School’s programs preparing New York City Teaching Fellows and teachers in the Teach For America program are among the city’s five largest, and the university has a 20-year-plus relationship with MS 131, regularly providing education students as teachers and after-school tutoring.

The new high school also is incorporating ideas from twenty-five 8th grade students who were asked for ideas about the “high school of your dreams.” Four of them sat on the planning committee.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university committed to opportunity, teaching and learning, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. It has eight campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. More than 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu.

Pace University to Host Community Chinese New Year Extravaganza

Eighty local school children from Chinatown in downtown New York will participate in Pace University’s School of Education’s 18th annual Chinese New Year Extravaganza celebrating the year of the Horse, 4700. More than 400 local school children from Chinatown and Brooklyn will come to watch the celebration. The celebration will take place at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts on Spruce and Gold Streets of the University’s downtown campus on February 6, from 12:00 – 1:30 p.m.

NEW YORK – Eighty local school children from Chinatown in downtown New York will participate in Pace University’s School of Education’s 18th annual Chinese New Year Extravaganza celebrating the year of the Horse, 4700. More than 400 local school children from Chinatown and Brooklyn will come to watch the celebration. The celebration will take place at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts on Spruce and Gold Streets of the University’s downtown campus on February 6, from 12:00 – 1:30 p.m.

To ring in the Year of the Horse children from Chinatown schools JHS 56, PS 2, and IS 131 will perform traditional Chinese dances choreographed by A.R.T.S., Inc. A children’s art exhibition will be also on display at the bookstore at One Pace Plaza, level B, from February 2 to 9 from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. There will be a special showing of the exhibit in the lobby of the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts on February 6.

The event is co-sponsored by JPMorgan Chase, United Chinese Students Association and the Office of Multicultural Affairs in conjunction with A. R. T. S., Inc. and the Chinese American Planning Council.

The Chinese New Year Extravaganza is a community event open to the public; reservations are not required for individuals but school groups should call in advance to ensure space. For access to the art exhibit please call in advance.

For more information call: Jennifer White at 212-346-1118

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.