The Christian Science Monitor: “No, Chinese inflation isn’t a good sign”

Experts say that Chinese inflation is a natural side effect of a healthy economy. Here’s why they’re wrong, acccording to “Guest Blogger” Joseph Salerno, a professor of economics in Pace’s Lubin School of Business.

The Christian Science Monitor writes that it has “assembled a diverse group of the best economy-related bloggers out there – “The Circle Bastiat” – and we are proud that Lubin’s Joseph Salerno is one of them!

Dr. Salerno’s most recent article focused on inflation in China. It is embedded below, or read it online.

No, Chinese inflation isn’t a good sign

Experts say that Chinese inflation is a natural side effect of a healthy economy. Here’s why they’re wrong.

By , Guest blogger / April 10, 2012

Well, well, well, the Chinese economy is experiencing inflation. Overall consumer prices rose by 3.6 percent in March 2012, year-over-year, including an upsurge in food prices of 7.5 percent. Even the prices of venerable Chinese herbal medicines took an upward leap of 8.3 percent. According to a CNNMoney report, inflation is “the price of prosperity.” The report goes on to fatuously instruct us, “While inflation poses challenges for consumers, it is the byproduct of one of the most robust economies in the world.” A comparison of China’s 9.2 percent real GDP growth in 2011 with the paltry 1.2 percent growth rate for U.S. real GDP in the same year is thrown in as supposed proof of this statement.

But this is utter nonsense and one of the most deeply entrenched myths in both academic economics and media commentary. Basic economic theory demonstrates that “economic growth,” which is nothing but  an increase in the supplies of various goods and services, is in and of itself deflationary. An increase in the supply of any good (or service), with the supply of money and all other factors fixed, results in a fall in its price and a growth in its sales, as the excess supply of the good drives the equilibrium price down and expands the quantity demanded. This irrefutable economic truth has been illustrated time and again since the late 1970s by sharp declines in the prices of items like personal computers, video game systems, HDTVs, digital cameras, and cell phones and of (uninsured) medical procedures like Lasik eye surgery and cosmetic surgery. Furthermore, this fall in prices has not caused stagnation in these industries but has instead coincided with their rapid expansion. I have explained this phenomenon of  “growth deflation” in more depth elsewhere.

What then is the cause of the accelerating Chinese inflation? We need look no further than the money supply. The broad measure of the Chinese money supply, M2, which includes currency in circulation and all bank deposits, increased by 13.6 percent in 2011, although the People’s Bank of China had targeted a 16 percent increase. The PBOC has announced that it will set the money supply growth rate at 14 percent for 2012. This inflation targeting policy, so beloved by contemporary macroeconomists, augurs more rapid price inflation for Chinese consumers for years to come. More important,  China’s long-standing super-loose monetary policy means that inflationary credit expansion has fueled a great part of the rapid growth of the Chinese economy, which is therefore unsustainable and doomed to collapse. Indeed, the pace of Chinese economic growth has already begun to falter in the last two quarters. In response, the PBOC has already cut reserve requirements twice in the last three months.

Having allowed the inflation tiger out of its cage, the Chinese government is now desperately hanging on to its tail. It must either cage the tiger forthwith  and confront the damage it has already wreaked in the form of a collapse in its economic growth rate; or it must inevitably lose its grip and permit its burgeoning market economy to be devoured by the beast in an inflationary breakdown and reimposition of direct controls.

The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of the best economy-related bloggers out there. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by the Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers’ own, as is responsibility for the content of their blogs. To contact us about a blogger, click here. To add or view a comment on a guest blog, please go to the blogger’s own site by clicking on blog.mises.org.

“On The Money!” with Steve Pomeranz: Guest Dr. Michael Szenberg, Distinguished Professor Of Economics, Lubin School of Business

Economist Michael Szenberg shares his thoughts on rescuing America, covering the deficit and restoring confidence with “The Investor’s Advocate” Steve Pomeranz, in an “On The Money!” radio interview broadcast to over one million listeners throughout Florida, Oklahoma, Indiana, New Hampshire and New York.

The position of the United States given both the high level of U.S. debt and its budget deficit within the framework of a globalized and interdependent world economy was the topic of discussion between Lubin Professor Michael Szenberg, Ph.D, and “On the Money” Host Steve Pomeranz, CFP.  

If you were not among the over one million listeners who heard the interview initially when it aired on Friday, October 28, on one of these 9 radio stations, click HERE to listen to a podcast now.  

Key points made and proposed by Dr. Szenberg include:

  •  The burning point at the present time is the high deficit and debt levels of the U.S. that affect the confidence in willingness and ability of the U.S. to  maintain its leadership position, which is so crucially needed.
  • China has substantially increased capabilities in terms of military and economic power. But it cannot match the power of the U.S. due to its lack of moral power.
  • How do we improve the economic capabilities of the U.S.? Reducing sharply the deficit and debt levels will increase the most important component of economic development – confidence in the country.
  • My proposal is for the U.S. President appearing in an extraordinary address, accompanied by leaders of both parties and representatives of every segment of the population – from multimillionaires like Warren Buffett, to blue collar workers. The address will focus on how to save America and prevent its decline similar to that of other civilizations in the past. The American exceptionalism will be reflected in the willingness of the people to contribute voluntarily part of their savings for the purpose of eliminating the public debt and reinforcing the confidence in the U.S.
  • What unites all Americans irrespective of their affiliations is that we all want America to prosper.

MEDIA ALERT/INSIDE TRACK DISCUSSION, OCT 25 at 7 PM – “Creative Destruction: Innovation in America and China” with Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman and Management Consultant/Best-Selling Author Richard Foster

Austrian economist Joseph Schumpeter’s “gales of creative destruction” are blowing and many companies are being taken under by this storm. Richard Foster shares his view on how the changing economy of China will determine which U.S. businesses will survive and prosper, and which ones will wither and die.

Get the INSIDE TRACK on how the changing economy of China will determine which U.S. businesses will survive and prosper … and which ones will wither and die.

PACE UNIVERSITY MEDIA EVENT ALERT

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25 at 7:00 PM, NEW YORK CITY CAMPUS

“CREATIVE DESTRUCTION: INNOVATION IN AMERICA AND CHINA”

An engaging, thought-provoking discussion with Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman and Leading Management Consultant, Best-Selling Author and “Wizard of Innovation” Richard Foster

When: Tuesday, October 25, 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM.

Where: Pace University, Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, 3 Spruce Street, New York, NY 10038. Directions: http://bit.ly/qxH0g3

Who:  Richard Foster is an emeritus director of McKinsey & Company, where he founded the technology and innovation practice, the health care practice, and the private equity practice, and led McKinsey’s worldwide knowledge development. He currently advises health care service and technology companies on how to capitalize on disruptive innovation. He has written two bestselling books: Innovation: The Attacker’s Advantage and Creative Destruction.

Stephen J. Friedman became president of Pace University on June 4, 2007. Friedman is a former senior partner at Debevoise & Plimpton LLC, commissioner of the Securities and Exchange Commission, deputy assistant secretary of the Treasury, executive vice president at The Equitable Companies Incorporated and the E.F. Hutton Group Inc., and U.S. Supreme Court law clerk. Friedman served for three years as dean of Pace University School of Law prior to being named president by the Pace University Board of Trustees.

What is Creative Destruction? The automobile cost blacksmiths their jobs; personal computers replaced the typewriter. The Internet has seriously impacted the publishing, music and film industries. Based on an “endless cycle of innovation” concept first popularized by economist Joseph Alois Schumpeter, creative destruction suggests that companies can outperform capital markets and maintain their leadership positions only if they creatively and continuously reconstruct themselves. In doing so, they can stay ahead of the upstart challengers constantly waiting in the wings.

About Inside Track with President Stephen J. Friedman: A forum that brings the world’s most renowned leaders to Pace University to inspire, motivate and provide deeper insight into social, political, economic and environmental issues that affect us all.

RSVP: The event is free and open to the public, as well as to the Pace community.  Please register in advance online at www.pace.edu/insidetrack

Pace Media Contact: Samuella Becker, sbecker2@pace.edu, 212-346-1637 or 917-734-5172

Teledifusão de Macau: History Professor Joseph Tse-Hei Lee interviewed about Chinese riots

Pace University history Professor Joseph Tse-Hei Lee attended a China study conference in Macau and gave a TV interview on June 16, 2011 on Teledifusão de Macau: English TV News on the Sichuan migrant workers’ riots in Chaozhou and Guangzhou, South China.

Visit the new Pace University News YouTube channel to see the video of the interview:

Professor Lee gives TV interview in China.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University Hosts Regional Finals of Competition in Knowledge of Chinese Language and Culture for Prizes of Trips to Beijing

On Saturday, April 23, from 10:00AM to 4:00PM in the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University’s downtown Manhattan campus, approximately 25 non-Chinese contestants will try to impress Chinese judges with knowledge of the world’s most-spoken language and its culture.

2nd Annual Chinese Bridge East USA Proficiency Competition for Foreign College Students; Celebrating Chinese Culture and Language Education

Saturday, April 23, 2011, 10 AM-4 PM, Pace University Schimmel Center for the Arts, 1 Pace Plaza, New York, NY

Media Contact:

Cara Cea, Pace Public Information, 914-773-3312, cell 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

NEW YORK, NY, April 21, 2011 – On Saturday, April 23, from 10:00AM to 4:00PM in the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University’s downtown Manhattan campus, approximately 25 non-Chinese contestants will try to impress Chinese judges with knowledge of the world’s most-spoken language and its culture.

They will give speeches in Chinese, perform Chinese songs and dances, demonstrate paper cuts, calligraphy, and martial arts, and answer questions China – past and present.

The winners will get a chance to compete against contestants from around the world in a final round this summer in Beijing, all expenses paid, where they could win scholarships to study in China for a semester.

The event is free and open to the public. The auditorium is located at 3 Spruce Street, just east of City Hall. Please contact alurio@pace.edu or call 212-346-1686 for free tickets.

Media admission by press pass.

The competition is the 10th annual “Chinese Bridge,” officially known as the Greater New York Chinese Proficiency Competition for Foreign College Students. It is hosted by the Confucius Institute at Pace University and sponsored by Hanban, the nonprofit organization organized by the Chinese government to spread knowledge of Chinese language and culture around the world.

Saturday’s competitors have risen to the top of an original field of approximately 85 contestants from preliminary rounds held earlier this month at New York University and Ohio State. The initial entrants came from over 13 countries including the US, England, Germany, Spain, Korea and Japan. They are studying at 32 universities ranging from Penn State and Princeton to the University of Akron and SUNY Binghamton.

Roughly a third of the regional finalists will be chosen for the final round.

Opened in 2009, the Confucius Institute at Pace University is the first university-based Confucius Institute in New York City and one of 60 in the US and nearly 300 around the world created by China to spread knowledge of Chinese language and culture.

Confucius Open House
April 29, 2011, 12:00-4:00PM, Student Union, 1 Pace Plaza, NYC Campus

Including tours of the Confucius Institute, a hands-on demonstration of calligraphy with world renowned expert Dr. Bin Zhou, a full breathing and body Qi Gong workout with master Xueming Bao, a presentation about our Chinese Classes, refreshments, and more.

About the Pace Confucius Institute

The competitions are among the first events arranged by the Confucius Institute at Pace. It expects to inaugurate Chinese language classes for both students and professional groups; encourage interdisciplinary scholarship on China through collaborate research, conferences and public lectures; develop innovative teaching and learning techniques and institutional exchanges, integrate study of China into Pace University’s liberal arts and professional curricula, and sponsor seminars for professionals in business, education, film and theater.

Its budget is contributed in equal shares by Pace, Hanban, and the Phoenix Publishing and Media Group, one of China’s largest media conglomerates. PPMG has sent executives to Pace’s graduate publishing program since 2007.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

The Epoch Times: “City Officials Kick Off Chinese New Year”

The Epoch Times’ article on the Lunar New Year celebration held at Pace University with members of the NY City Council and Pace’s Confucius Institute for learning Chinese language and culture quoted Pace President Stephen Friedman who spoke to the audience “about Pace’s ‘pursuit of commitment to provide the Lower Manhattan community with cultural entertainment.'”

Pace, the Confucius Institute at Pace University, and the New York City Council celebrated the Lunar New Year together in the company of many VIPs and Very Important Performers.

Read the full article in The Epoch Times.

Pace News Advisory

Visit the Confucius Institute at Pace!

NEWS ADVISORY: Lunar New Year Celebration (Chinese and other Asian cultures) with New York City Council and Pace University Confucius Institute

Public Lunar New Year Celebration will be hosted by New York City Council and Pace University Confucius Institute, with free Chinese music and refreshments. The event celebrates “lunar” New Year, the basis of festivals in China and other Asian countries.

 

1/31/11

EVENT LISTING

“HEAVENLY PEACHES”

Lunar New Year Celebration (Chinese and other Asian cultures) with New York City Council and Pace University Confucius Institute

WHAT: Public Lunar New Year Celebration hosted by New York City Council and Pace University Confucius Institute, with free Chinese music and refreshments. The event celebrates “lunar” New Year, the basis of festivals in China and other Asian countries. It will include brief remarks by City Council President Christine Quinn, Council Member Margaret Chin, and Pace President Stephen Friedman, a former corporate lawyer who has just returned from a trip to China, plus explanations of the new “Smart Chinese” language instruction offered by the Pace Confucius Institute.

WHERE: Student Union, Pace University downtown Manhattan campus, 1 Pace Plaza (just east of City Hall). Media admission by press pass.

WHEN: Sunday, February 13. Performance begins at 3 pm, buffet at 4:15. (The actual date of the Lunar New Year in 2011 is February 3, but the first fifteen days of the new year are all considered celebration days.)

WHO:  City Council President Christine C. Quinn

City Council Member Margaret Chin, District 1 (chief Council sponsor)

City Council Members Daniel Dromm (District 25) and Peter Koo (District 20)

Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman

Pace Professor Weihua Niu, Director, Pace Confucius Institute

PROGRAM: Costumed percussionists, singers and dancers from the Chinese Theater Works company will perform selections from the dramatic Kun form of Chinese opera with masks and drumming, the “Dance of Zhong Quei” from the repertoire of the Peking Opera, the Chinese lion dance, folksongs including “Fisherman’s Song at Sunset” and “Fighting the Typhoon,” and an excerpt from the “Monkey King” legend that is beloved throughout China, “Monkey King Steals the Heavenly Peaches.”

PERFORMERS: Singing and playing erhu, guzheng, and percussion will be Gang Tian, Qi Zhang, Junling Wang, Zhensheng Wang, Fuyin Zhai, Wenpang Zhang, Penghui Yang, Zhigang Liu, Kuang-Yu Fong, and Peking Opera percussionists Gang Tian, Shirong Huang, Qi Zhang, and Zhensheng Wang.

MENU will include dumplings and other traditional New Year foods.

REGISTRATION REQUIRED by February 7 to kmagee@council.nyc.gov

Media contact: Bill Caldwell, Pace media relations, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

NEWS RELEASE: China’s Oprah? Bestselling adapter of Confucius for stressed-out moderns to speak at Pace University Wednesday, Oct. 20

On Wednesday, October 20, Yu, the woman whose “Confucius from the Heart: Ancient Wisdom for Today’s World” has become a worldwide phenomenon, will speak on Confucius in downtown Manhattan at 6:30 PM, at the student union of Pace University’s campus just east of City Hall (corner of Spruce St. and Park Row). Her talk is free and open to the public. A day later, a second celebrated Chinese scholar, the expert on Chinese literature and art Liu Mengxi, will speak at Columbia Teachers College, exploring the distinct patterns of modernization in Europe, the US, and China. His talk, also free and open to the public, is at the Zankel Building, Room 125, 525 West 120th Street, on Thursday, October 21 at 6:30 pm.

Liu Mengxi

Scholar of Chinese literature and art to speak on European, US, Chinese modernization at Columbia Teachers College Thursday, Oct. 21

Both events, co sponsored with China Institute, signal increasing activity by Pace University’s recently-established Confucius Institute

NEW YORK, NY, October 12, 2010 — If Oprah Winfrey gave self-help lectures adapted from the U.S. Constitution and made them a book, could she sell 11 million copies around the world in four years?

That’s just what the Chinese TV personality and professor Yu Dan recently did with the wisdom of Confucius, whose ideas underpinned Chinese government and culture for thousands of years but were rejected by the country’s modern revolution.

On Wednesday, October 20, Yu, the woman whose “Confucius from the Heart: Ancient Wisdom for Today’s World” has become a worldwide phenomenon,  will speak on Confucius in downtown Manhattan at 6:30 PM, at the student union of Pace University’s campus just east of City Hall (corner of Spruce St. and Park Row). Her talk is free and open to the public.

A day later, a second celebrated Chinese scholar, the expert on Chinese literature and art Liu Mengxi, will speak at Columbia Teachers College, exploring the distinct patterns of modernization in Europe, the US, and China. His talk, also free and open to the public, is at the Zankel Building, Room 125, 525 West 120th Street, on Thursday, October 21 at 6:30 pm.

The two events are co-sponsored by Pace’s Confucius Institute, which this fall has begun teaching Chinese language and culture to Pace students, Wall Streeters, and others, and by the city’s China Institute.

Advance reservations for both can be made at ccampbell@pace.edu or 212-346-1880. Media are welcome at both; admission by press pass.

Inspiration and self-help

In 2006, Yu, a mediagenic professor of communications who is vice dean of Beijing Normal University, got time on nationwide TV in China during a national holiday period for a series of lectures about Confucius, based on his famous “Analects.”

In an inspirational self-help mode, Yu adapted Confucius for stressed-out moderns, weaving his 2,500-year-old sayings together with her own experiences.

The lectures made her a household name and soon became a book that turned into one of China’s all-time best sellers. It beat out the country’s other top seller, the Harry Potter series, according to a Los Angeles Times report. Sales hit five million legally and according to the New York Times reached six million more in pirated editions.”Confucius from the Heart” now has been translated into more than 25 languages. (It was published in the US in 2009 by Atria Books, a division of Simon and Schuster.)

Yu and Liu will be in New York after participating in the Second U.S. – China Cultural Forum at the University of California-Berkeley October 15 and 16. The forum is co-sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities, and Berkeley’s Center for Chinese Studies.

A third way to modernize?

Liu directs the Institute of Chinese Culture of the Chinese National Academy of Arts, where he also is a research fellow. He has compiled 35 volumes of classic works in Chinese culture and is founder and chief editor of the magazine Chinese Culture.

His October 21 talk will outline national modernization patterns, first of Europe and then of the U.S., and explore whether China is pursuing a third way. His lecture is titled “Agree to Disagree: On Chinese and American Cultural Modes.”

Liu’s presentation will be preceded by seven musicians from Nanjing Normal University performing such classic Chinese music as “Moon’s Reflection on the Second Spring,” “Purple Bamboo Tune,” and “The Scent of Jasmine Flower.”

50 Chinese phrases for business travel

The Pace Confucius Institute this fall inaugurated Chinese language classes for students and professional groups, starting with an early-morning (7:30 AM), month-long set of hour-long classes on 50 of the most useful phrases for business travel in China, and a one-month series of one-hour lunchtime classes in basic conversation.

The Institute also is offering custom courses conducted off campus at businesses and institutions, which one witty consumer of New York City’s ubiquitous Chinese “take out” food has called “Chinese take-in.”

Founded in 2009, the Pace Institute is the only Confucius institute in the New York metropolitan area associated with a University. Its seal is below, a traditional-style stamp saying “Confucius Institute Pace University” in “small-seal” script. It was created for the Institute by Beijing calligrapher Quiming Sun.

About Pace University

For 103 years, Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter:  NYC | PLV

Contacts

Christopher Cory, media relations, Pace University, 212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

Weihua Niu, PhD, Director, Pace University Confucius Institute, 212-346-1815, wniu@pace.edu

NEWS RELEASE: Teachers Day – a new celebration for New York?

On Friday, October 15, Pace University’s Conficius Institute will present a Chinese cultural festival at MS 345, the Castle Middle School on the Lower East Side of Manhattan at 220 Henry Street. The festival will be held after-school between 3:30 and 6:30 PM. About 60 middle school students are expected to attend.

Pace University Confucius Institute shows the way Friday, October 15 with transplant of traditional Chinese observance

Tree planting and cultural festival at Castle middle school on Lower East Side

NOTE: The Director of the Pace Confucius Institute, Weihua Niu, PhD, and school officials are available for interviews.

Photo available of this fall’s Teacher Day in China showing schoolchildren displaying collages and greeting cards that say “I love you, teacher.”

NEW YORK, NY, October 8, 2010 – In China, a special day each fall is devoted to celebrating teachers.

Why not do the same thing in New York?

That idea is being put forward by the Confucius Institute at Pace University, which teaches Chinese language and culture to students, businesspeople, and ordinary citizens.

As a demonstration, on Friday, October 15, the Institute will present a Chinese cultural festival at MS 345, the Castle Middle School on the Lower East Side of Manhattan at 220 Henry Street. The festival will be held after-school between 3:30 and 6:30 PM. About 60 middle-school students are expected to attend.

The theme of the festival will be honoring teachers, as they are honored in China at this time of year when Teachers’ Day is celebrated.

Media admission by press pass.

Nectarine tree and dumplings

Teachers’ Day falls around the traditional birthday of Confucius, the great sage and teacher.

He once said that “If you think in terms of a year, plant a seed; if in terms of ten years, plant trees; if in terms of 100 years, teach the people.” To symbolize the growth that teachers bring to their students’ lives, a nectarine tree will be planted in the courtyard of the school.

After the tree planting, the students will participate in two interactive workshops to learn Kung Fu techniques and philosophy and will view a short video on Chinese traditions. They will then paint murals to reflect on what they learned.

After the workshops, the students will be treated to a traditional Chinese buffet dinner of dumplings, stir-fried vegetables, and desserts. The festival will conclude with a version of the Chinese opera “The Monkey King,” performed by the acclaimed theatre troupe Chinese Theatre Works.

“The dumplings and Chinese food are optional, and so are the workshops and other details,” said Weihua Niu, PhD, the director of the Pace Confucius Institute. “We just think a ceremony involving students in honoring teachers is an idea that makes universal sense.”

She added that the Pace Confucius Institute will explore ways of encouraging the idea further next year.

About the Pace Confucius Institute

The Pace Confucius Institute, founded in 2009, is the only Confucius institute in the New York metropolitan area associated with a University.

This fall it is inaugurating Chinese language classes for students and professional groups, starting with an early-morning, one-month set of hour-long classes on 50 of the most useful phrases for business travel in China, and a month long set of one-hour lunchtime classes in basic conversation.

The Institute also is offering custom courses conducted at businesses and institutions. One witty consumer of New York City’s ubiquitous Chinese “take out” food has called these Chinese “take-in.”

The Institute additionally works to encourage interdisciplinary scholarship on China through collaborative research, conferences, and public lectures; develop innovative teaching and learning techniques and institutional exchanges; integrate study of China into Pace University’s liberal arts and professional curricula; and sponsor seminars for professionals in business, education, film, and theater.

Its budget is contributed in equal shares by Pace, the Office of Chinese Language Council International (Hanban), and the Phoenix Publishing and Media Group, one of China’s largest media conglomerates. PPMG has sent executives to Pace’s graduate publishing program since 2007.

About Pace University

For 103 years, Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter:  NYC | PLV

Contacts

Christopher Cory, media relations, Pace University

212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

Weihua Niu, PhD, Director, Pace University Confucius Institute

212-346-1815, wniu@pace.edu

230 Chinese Language Teachers to Participate in 8th Annual Conference at Pace

How are Americans doing at learning Chinese? Come find out on May 15 when the Confucius Institute at Pace University will host the 8th annual conference of the Chinese Language Teachers Association of Greater New York, in which more than 230 teachers and scholars are expected to participate.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

Do you Speak Chinese? Why not?

230 TEACHERS AND SCHOLARS EXPECTED TO PARTICIPATE IN 8TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF CHINESE LANGUAGE TEACHERS ASSOCIATION OF GREATER NEW YORK AT PACE UNIVERSITY

Confucius Institute at Pace to host; Pace demonstrates increasing links to China with third of four China related events in a month

NEW YORK, NY, May 12, 2010 – How are Americans doing at learning Chinese? Come find out on May 15 when the Confucius Institute at Pace University will host the 8th annual conference of the Chinese Language Teachers Association of Greater New York, in which more than 230 teachers and scholars are expected to participate.

Attendees from secondary schools, colleges and universities will be offered nearly 60 presentations on everything from Chinese naming conventions to motivating online learners and “digital Chinese storytelling.” The presenters range from master teachers from China to professors from Yale, Columbia and NYU to teachers of Chinese at such private schools as Far Hills Country Day School and Rye Country Day School.

More information on the conference is at http://clta-gny.org/10conf/10conf_invite.html.

This comes as part of current efforts by China to encourage foreigners to know it better at the levels that undergird commerce and diplomacy.

The conference will take place from 8:00am – 5:30pm in the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts auditorium, 1 Pace Plaza, NY, NY, entrance at 3 Spruce Street, just east of City Hall.

The event is free and open to the public. Media admission by press pass. Please notify us if you will cover this event or would like to interview some of the organizers and participants by phone.

Opened last May, the Confucius Institute at Pace University is the first university-based Confucius Institute in New York City and one of 70 in the US and over 300 around the world created by China to spread knowledge of Chinese language and culture.

More About the Pace Confucius Institute The conference is one of the four major events arranged by the Confucius Institute at Pace to celebrate its first anniversary. It expects to inaugurate Chinese language classes for both students and professional groups; encourage interdisciplinary scholarship on China through collaborative research, conferences and public lectures; develop innovative teaching and learning techniques and institutional exchanges; integrate study of China into Pace University’s liberal arts and professional curricula; and sponsor seminars for professionals in business, education, film and theater.

Its budget is contributed in equal shares by Pace, Chinese media conglomerate Phoenix Publishing and Media Group (PPMG), and Hanban, the executive body of the Chinese Language Council International. PPMG has sent executives to Pace’s graduate publishing program since 2007. Its Chinese partner university is Nanjing Normal University, one of the leading universities in China for preparing Chinese teachers for teaching Chinese as a second language.

A first anniversary celebration a screening of the film “Confucius” followed by a panel discussion is planned for May 19 beginning at 2:00pm at Pace’s downtown NYC campus as well. Panelists include professors from Pace, Purchase College and Yale University.

http://www.pace.edu/pace/dyson/media/files/pdf/confucius/first-anniversary/FirstAnniversaryProgram.pdf

For more information on Confucius Institute visit www.pace.edu/confucius

About Pace University

For nearly 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

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