914INC: “Westchester Corporations’ Charitable Involvement”

Rebecca Tekula, PhD, and Anna-Kay Sinclair of The Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University are interviewed about corporate philanthropy in Westchester—who gives and what they get in return.

Hundreds of companies make a conscious effort to support worthy causes in the county. But what do the companies—and their stockholders—get out of the deal, wondered reporter Dave Donelson in an article appearing in Westchester business lifestyle magazine 914Inc.

It’s not an idle question. Corporate philanthropy is big business in Westchester and it’s growing more important as nonprofit providers of essential social services face budget cuts from state, county, and municipal governments and declines in giving by private individuals.

How big?

According to Anna-Kay Sinclair of The Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University, there were 971 registered private foundations with assets of over $2.8 billion in the county in 2010. That year, six Westchester-based corporate foundations made up 20 percent of total private foundation revenue—more than $78 million of the $391 million total for the county. The major half-dozen were foundations funded by PepsiCo, Pepsi Bottling Group, IBM, Dannon, Heineken, and MBIA based in Armonk.  

Potential sales growth helps explain what The Wilson Center’s executive director, Rebecca Tekula, PhD, observes: “What I see is less idiosyncratic donations based on the personal interests of the corporate leaders and more social responsibility related to the core business.”

In other words, donations are made not because the CEO likes the opera, but because companies believe it helps build the bottom line.

Interest.com: “6 ways to make giving to charity work for you”

Your mother always taught you to share with others. Yet, it’s often difficult to choose a charity and to know when to give, how much to give and when to move on to another cause. Pace’s Dr. Rebecca Tekula advises why it is important to “do your research” before giving back.

Interest.com, a Bankrate website which claims a readership of 500,000 monthly, helps consumers make smart decisions about almost every aspect of their financial lives, including donating to a cause they care about.

Rebecca Tekula, executive director of the Helene and Grant Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University in New York, advocates using online resources to determine which charities really deserve your money.

Tip 5. Do your research.

Tekula suggests that people look at their philanthropic investments in the same way they’d view other investments.

You’re not only investing your funds, you also need to consider long-term expectations.

In addition to investigating a cause’s website, Tekula shares some of her favorite online resources for researching charities:

Guidestar — This is a great starting-off point and fundamental resource for analyzing facts, including tax returns and salaries.
Charity Navigator — This website uses a star system based on evolving and sophisticated fundamentals of the organizations. A great resource for the financially savvy reader that looks at the charities the way you look at a business, based on return on philanthropic investment, return on social investment.
GiveWell — The next step in evaluating a charity, according to Tekula, the top-rated charities it recommends are proven, cost effective, underfunded and outstanding.

To read all “6 ways to make giving to charity work for you” – click here 

New Scholarship Fund for Black Music Pioneer Covered by New York Daily News Online

Pace’s new scholarship fund for black music pioneer Sydney Small was covered by New York Daily News online.

Pace’s new scholarship fund for black music pioneer Sydney Small was covered by New York Daily News online on September 16. Click on the link or read the excerpt of the text below.

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv/2010/09/16/2010-09-16_black_pioneers_legacy_to_live_on.html?r=entertainment

“A scholarship fund has been established at Pace University for the late Sydney Small, who ran WWRL (1600 AM) and was a lifelong advocate for minority voices in the mainstream media.

Small died Aug. 8 while cycling in Central Park. He was 72.

The Brooklyn native founded the National Black Network (NBN) in 1972. NBN evolved into Access 1, which owns WWRL and other radio stations.

He was a founding member of the National Association of Black Owned Broadcasters (NABOB) and a prominent spokesman for minority media ownership.

When ratings for minority stations dropped under Artbitron’s new Portable People Meter (PPM) system, he was among the station owners asking Arbitron to reassess the system.

He also helped press Madison Avenue to give minority media a greater share of advertising dollars and led NABOB’s efforts to get federal distress loans for minority broadcasters threatened by the recession.

To contribute to the Sydney L. Small scholarship fund at Pace, go to pace.edu/givenow.”

Danielle Ricco Holiday Toy Drive

The event was created in order to remember Danielle and keep her spirit alive by collecting and donating toys to make the holidays brighter for children.

MEDIA ALERT

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION AT PACE UNIVERSITY
HOSTS THE FIRST ANNUAL DANIELLE RICCO HOLIDAY TOY DRIVE
IN MEMORY OF FORMER STUDENT WHO HAD A PASSION FOR MUSIC, CHILDREN, CHRISTMAS AND ALL THINGS DISNEY

WHEN: Saturday, December 16 at 10 AM

WHERE: Pace University, One Place Plaza, NYC campus. The Danielle Ricco Holiday Toy Drive will “kick off” outdoors on the Pace plaza, at the building entrance that directly faces City Hall.

WHY: To remember Danielle and keep her spirit alive by collecting and donating toys to make the holidays brighter for children.

SPECIAL GUESTS: The Ricco family and Amy Vallarelli, who was with Danielle the night she died, will attend this event, which is being sponsored by the Student Government Association (SGA) at Pace University.

WHAT TO BRING: Unwrapped toys for boys and girls, new and in their original packaging. Recipients of the gifts will be selected by Danielle’s family. While Saturday, December 16 is a big day for the drive, more toys are expected to come in over the next few days. The toy drive ends on Wednesday, December 20. Toys can be dropped off in large boxes labeled in Danielle’s name at both Pace University’s two main undergraduate campuses in Manhattan and Pleasantville, New York. Donations will also be solicited by the SGA at the women’s (5:30 PM) and men’s (7:30 PM) Pace vs. Le Moyne basketball games held at the Goldstein Health, Fitness & Recreation Center on Pace’s Pleasantville campus on Saturday, December 16. Directions to Pace campuses can be obtained at page.cfm?doc_id=154

ABOUT DANIELLE: Danielle Ricco, age 20, died on June 14, 2006, on the West Side Highway after a taxi accident claimed her life and injured two other Pace students, Amy Vallarelli and Enza Salustio, in addition to Enza’s sister, Anna. A native of Staten Island and a hospitality major, Danielle had just completed her sophomore year at Pace. She was about to realize her longtime dream of working for the Walt Disney Company when her life was unexpectedly cut short just before her summer internship.

MEDIA CONTACT: Samuella Becker, Pace University, 212-346-1637 and 917-734-5172, sbecker2@pace.edu

C-SPAN class and photo exhibit to explore New Orleans in the aftermath of Katrina

C-SPAN to cover U.S. Senator Mary Landrieux of Lousiana, and Alan Colón, black and African studies professor from New Orleans’ Dillard University, in live course on race and other problems in Katrina response from Pace University and Denver University Thursday, February 16 at 3 PM.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact:
Cara Halstead, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 914-773-3312, Cell: 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu

KATRINA AFTERMATH COMES TO METRO NY AREA:
C-SPAN to cover U.S. Senator Mary Landrieux of Lousiana, and Alan Colón, black and African studies professor from New Orleans’ Dillard University, in live course on race and other problems in Katrina response from Pace University and Denver University Thursday, February 16 at 3 PM.

Discussions by Colón on same day to be open to public
in Pleasantville and Downtown Manhattan campuses of Pace

Pace to exhibit recent disturbing documentary photographs, starting March 13, showing how little has changed in New Orleans’ 9th ward after five months.

Pace students to spend spring break in New Orleans to help with rebuilding effort

Editors Note: Media welcome to all events listed below. Prof. Alan Colón will be available to meet with press and for photo ops by appointment in between sessions as well. Also, a preview of Pace Professor Chris Malone’s documentary Katrina aftermath photos (to be on exhibit in March) will be on display during Colón’s talks.

Professor Alan K. Colón, Ph.D.

The C-SPAN course, now completing its second year, will appear on C-SPAN 3. It uses C-SPAN technology to simultaneously link students and their professors at the participating universities with studios in Washington, and regularly has high-ranking figures in politics and social issues as guests. The Pace section is taught by Christopher Malone, Ph.D, a new Orleans native who has revisited the city twice since the storm, volunteered in the reconstruction effort, and written passionately about the city’s unique spirit of survival.

Alan Colón, PhD., will spend Thursday, February 16th at Pace University in both Westchester and New York City. The theme of his talks will be:
“New Orleans in the Aftermath of Katrina: Lessons about Race, Culture, Class, Poverty, Education, Health Care, Emergency Preparedness, and Urban Development in the United States.”

Pace University: Pleasantville – 861 Bedford Rd.
Thursday, February 16
Gottesman Room – Kessel Campus Center, entrance 3
Public Presentation – 12:20pm – 1:30pm

Pace University: New York City – 1 Pace Plaza (across from City Hall)
Thursday, February 16th
Multi Purpose Room (entrance on Spruce St. between Park Row and Gold))
Public Presentation – 4:30pm – 5:30pm
Informal Reception and Conversation with Faculty and Staff – 5:30pm – 6:30pm

Both events are free and open to the public. Media admission is by press pass.

Colón is the National Endowment for the Humanities Eminent Professor of Education and African World Studies at Dillard University, a historically-black university in New Orleans 9th Ward. Colón’s research interests are in black and African studies, spanning history, sociology, and education, student development, and enrollment management. Before his appointment at Dillard, Colón was a professor and administrator at Hampton University of Virginia, The College of Charleston, and Howard University. He earned a Ph.D. in Higher Education Administration from Stanford University and an MSW from the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. He serves on the Board of Directors of the National Council of Black Studies and on the Advising Board of the African Heritage Studies Association.

Exhibit of New Orleans documentary photos March 13th – April 4th
New York City – 1 Pace Plaza, Peter Fingestin Gallery, Student Union
“Abandonment: New Orleans, Katrina, and the City that Care Forgot.”

The 30 images in the exhibit were taken by Pace Professor Chris Malone, PhD., during two trips to his native city of New Orleans in November and January. According to Malone, five months after the hurricane’s devastation, the neighborhoods in the images are largely untouched, frozen in time from the days following Katrina. Most of the images are from the devastated Ninth Ward, though many were taken elsewhere in the city.

Alternative spring break trip to New Orleans
March 19-24th, 2006

Pace students may participate in an Alternative spring break trip to New Orleans for a week to assist a New Orleans agency for the homeless with various projects to restore shelters and transitional housing. Details to be announced. The program is being organized by the Office of Student Affairs and Project Pericles at Pace University.

Pace University Sponsors America’s Walk for Diabetes

Students from all Pace University campuses have joined the Pace team for the walk, under team captain Jill Rothman, nurse educator in the Primary Health Care Associates Department at Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing.

Contact: Jill Rothman, Lienhard School of Nursing, Pace University, 914-882-8918, jrothman@pace.edu or Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY

October 15, 2004

PACE UNIVERSITY SPONSORS AMERICA’S WALK FOR DIABETES
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, AT RYE PLAYLAND, RYE, NY

WHAT: America’s Walk for Diabetes, the American Diabetes Association’s signature special events fund-raising campaign. With strong support from the community including sponsorship and corporate teams, this event raises nearly $20 million to find a cure for diabetes and to support the association’s mission.

WHO: Students from all Pace University campuses have joined the Pace team for the walk, under team captain Jill Rothman, nurse educator in the Primary Health Care Associates Department at Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing. A large number of Pace supporters are proudly walking to help the American Diabetes Association fight against diabetes, a disease affecting over 18.2 million Americans. This year’s team has a strong and committed group of freshman students from Valley Dorm on Pace’s Briarcliff campus and from Alpha Lambda Sigma Sorority on the Pleasantville campus.

“It is so important for students to give back,” says Rothman. “Their dedication and strong commitment to support such a worthy cause teaches the importance of helping others. Each student volunteering their time and support is an inspiration to others.”

WHEN: Sunday, October 17, 10 a.m.

WHERE: Rye Playland, Rye, NY

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university committed to opportunity, teaching and learning, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. It is one of the ten founders of Project Pericles, developing education that encourages lifelong participation in democratic processes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and the law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. Approximately 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu

Required Service: Media Advisory on Pace Pioneering Decision

Service here is linked to classes from math to media. Subject areas run from holiness to hemlock; service venues from gritty urban courts and AIDS centers to the church that wanted help with a museum about work done there by the first American-born Roman-Catholic saint, Mother Seton. Students have to analyze and reflect on the implications of what they are doing.

June 15, 2004

Required Service for College Students

You may have seen the Sunday op-ed in the New York Times calling for campuses to consider a “service requirement for graduation.” It’s by the novelist Dave Eggers, author of “A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius.” He says “some” colleges now do this.

Indeed. I’m writing just to make sure you know that a year ago Pace University was among the few major universities to make community service a full requirement for all students.

If you follow up on the trend to service requirements, or on the still-increasing trend for students to do collegiate service in general, we’ve got not only examples, but also evaluations.

Service here is linked to classes from math to media. Subject areas run from holiness to hemlock; service venues from gritty urban courts and AIDS centers to the church that wanted help with a museum about work done there by the first American-born Roman-Catholic saint, Mother Seton. Students have to analyze and reflect on the implications of what they are doing.

The requirement reflects Pace’s encouragement of participatory citizenship under President David A. Caputo, a Yale-trained political scientist who took over in July 2000. Additional impetus comes from Pace’s role as one of the 10 private colleges and universities that a year ago founded Project Pericles, a nationwide, nonprofit consortium of campuses that are increasing their students’ readiness for participatory citizenship. The project was envisioned and initially funded by the foundation set up by the industrialist and philanthropist Eugene M. Lang, creator of the “I Have a Dream” project.

Christopher T. Cory, Director of Public Information, Pace University 212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

Pace University Business Students Learn a Lesson in Entrepreneurship and Philanthropy

Pace University Lubin School of Business students in Dr. Robert Isaak’s Management 449 Honors seminar learned more this semester than just how to run a business. They also got a lesson in philanthropy when their own business ventures earned a profit and they decided to donate the money to worthy causes. The 27 undergraduate students will present nearly $900 to two local organizations on Tuesday, May 2, at 6 p.m., Rm. 100 in the Goldstein Academic Center on the Pleasantville campus.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. – Pace University Lubin School of Business students in Dr. Robert Isaak’s Management 449 Honors seminar learned more this semester than just how to run a business. They also got a lesson in philanthropy when their own business ventures earned a profit and they decided to donate the money to worthy causes. The 27 undergraduate students will present nearly $900 to two local organizations on Tuesday, May 2, at 6 p.m., Rm. 100 in the Goldstein Academic Center on the Pleasantville campus.

Dr. Isaak divided his class into two groups assigning each the task to create temporary businesses that are environmentally conscious. Students were asked to plan, launch, operate, and shut down their businesses and eventually pay back the $1,000 they were subsidized from the Lubin School to start their ventures.

The first group created and published a book titled Giving the Earth Back to the Kids, that focuses on teaching children about the environment. The students asked for $5 donations to cover the cost of the book. The books, printed on recycled paper, earned a profit of $458.81. The money and books will be donated to the Pleasantville Cottage School, a residential treatment center for children from broken homes.

The second group created a series of calendars that included pictures of Pace’s campus, of various Pace clubs and organizations, and of the University’s student athletes. Students took the photographs with a digital camera, designed the calendars with environmental epigrams, solicited advertising from local businesses, and persuaded the campus bookstore to sell their product. They earned a profit of $439.55, which will be donated to the Pace Environmental Center.

Dr. Isaak, whose tenth book is titled Green Logic: Ecopreneurship, Creativity and Ethics (Kumarian Press, 1999), said “The only way to teach entrepreneurship is through entrepreneurship. This course shows us that Pace students are capable of starting their own businesses as well as understanding how to share the profit.”

Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, with 5,500 students, offers undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degree programs, and hosts a number of research centers and institutes which extend its scholarship and teaching to a worldwide audience. The School is accredited by AACSB: the International Association for Management Education.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.