The Journal News: Rockland hosts major test of carbon storage to fight climate change | LoHud.com

Environmental writer for The Journal News, Greg Clary, called upon Pace Energy and Climate Center head Jamie Van Nostrand for his expertise regarding an experimental process of burying carbon under ground.
(Left: Workers for the TriCarb Consortium for Carbon Sequestration drill test wells along the Garden State Parkway in Chestnut Ridge on April 6. Peter Carr/The Journal News).

Environmental writer for The Journal News, Greg Clary, called upon Pace Energy and Climate Center head Jamie Van Nostrand for his expertise regarding an experimental process of burying carbon under ground.

From The Journal News:

A science project in Rockland is expected to speed up next month, when geologists drill holes to see whether carbon dioxide can be injected into the earth to keep it from rising into the air and creating climate problems.

… The technology also raises questions, even from those who support the concept.

“This pushes CO2 underground — but who bears the responsibility later on if it leaks out?” said James Van Nostrand, executive director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center. “The technology isn’t new, but so far no one has made it work on a large scale.”

Van Nostrand called it “the opposite of extraction” and said landowner issues haven’t been sorted out as mineral rights were long ago.

The process sounds similar to hydrofracking because liquid or gas is injected into the earth, but carbon dioxide is different than the chemicals, sand and other materials used in hydrofracking to force out natural gas from underground reservoirs.

For carbon dioxide storage, the concern is more about ensuring it doesn’t leak back from deep underground.

Van Nostrand said carbon storage is one of the strategies the government is investing “a lot of money” in to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent by 2050, part of an international campaign to reduce the effects of air pollution.

… Van Nostrand said the U.S. needs to use every technology possible to change the current emission trends.”The bottom line is we still get 49 percent of our energy from coal,” he said. “We have to develop carbon capture and storage.”

To read the full article:

Rockland hosts major test of carbon storage to fight climate change | The Journal News | LoHud.com.