Pace University’s Lubin School of Business Announces New e.MBA@Pace program To Commence January, 2000

Pace University’s Lubin School of Business will offer an online MBA
program that combines Internet-based learning with residencies for experienced
managers. This unique 24-month program is called e.MBA@Pace (pronounced
“e dot MBA at Pace”) and will be based on several large-scale projects and a
series of management skill modules. The first e.MBA class will begin in
January, 2000.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1696

NEW YORK-Pace University’s Lubin School of Business will offer an online MBA
program that combines Internet-based learning with residencies for experienced
managers. This unique 24-month program is called e.MBA@Pace (pronounced
“e dot MBA at Pace”) and will be based on several large-scale projects and a
series of management skill modules. The first e.MBA class will begin in
January, 2000.

The e.MBA@Pace program assigns projects, based on contemporary business
issues, to student teams. Team projects present student teams with complex
business problems that invite cross-disciplinary approaches for solution.
Examples of possible team projects include:

· Decide, as a manager of an American-based multinational, where to
locate new call centers to handle global call traffic.

· Develop a marketing plan for the expansion of a low-cost air
carrier into the NYC metropolitan area.

· Create a business plan to attract venture capital for a newly
developed, hand-held computing device that combines voice, e-mail,
fax, and data-base applications.

According to Lubin School Dean Arthur L. Centonze, the innovative new
educational structure adds to Pace University’s well-known full-time
and part-time graduate MBA programs, accredited by the AACSB, the
International Association for Management Education. Based on initial
inquiries, Lubin expects a significant demand for e.MBA@Pace among busy
executives and professionals who live a long distance from Pace’s
campuses or who travel extensively for business.

“Students will master traditional business tools, both qualitative and
quantitative, on a ‘need to know’ or ‘just in time’ basis,” said John
Dory, professor of management. “This approach to education, called
‘action learning’ or ‘outcome-based learning,’ has been highly effective
in complex business problem-solving situations.”

The students will also attend a series of 10 residencies at Pace
facilities during the 24 month degree program. The residencies will
allow for the presentation of project results, give program participants
time to work with faculty on individual assignments and enable faculty
to administer examinations. These face-to-face sessions will include
workshops on various management skills. Professor Dory notes that
candidates for the e.MBA@Pace program will have several years of
professional experience and a commitment to an innovative approach to
graduate business education. “To fluorish in the program, students must
be self-motivated, able to work independently and comfortable using the
Internet.”

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New
York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,000 students are enrolled
in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson
College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer
Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law,
Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Online Holiday Sales Bring Millions of New Customers to E-Companies:Strategies for Developing Consumer Loyalty

Online holiday sales surpassed all expectations and point
to a major shift in consumer buying power. In order to retain these millions
of new customers and develop consumer loyalty, John Hooks, professor of
computer science at Pace University, recommends that e-businesses emphasize
a basic tenet of business success: customer service.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1696
News@Pace.Edu

WHITE PLAINS, NY – Online holiday sales surpassed all expectations and point
to a major shift in consumer buying power. In order to retain these millions
of new customers and develop consumer loyalty, John Hooks, professor of
computer science at Pace University, recommends that e-businesses emphasize
a basic tenet of business success: customer service. In order to overcome
the impersonal nature of an electronic storefront, Hooks suggests the
following:

· Set up a toll-free number so that customers can call with questions or
orders.

· Keep in mind that an on-line retail operation has the potential to
receive orders and inquiries 24 hours a day. Make sure customer service
hours are clearly posted on your website.

· If you know you are experiencing a time lag or if you are out of
inventory for a particular item indicate this to your online customer
via e-mail as soon as possible. Nothing frustrates a buyer more than
the lack of timely information regarding their order.

· Follow up the transaction with an e-mail or phone call thanking
the customer for their business. Buyers will flock to an e-merchant
that possesses an attitude of gratitude!

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New
York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled
in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the
Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School
of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education,
School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade
Institute.

Pace University Study Shows that Temporary Workers are Just as Motivated as Permanent Staff

If you’re concerned that your temporary staff is slacking off, don’t worry – a new Pace University study shows that contingent workers are just as motivated as permanent employees. New findings of the attitudes, behaviors and motivations of contingent workers shatter many popular myths about this sector of the labor force.

Posted by Public Affairs on March 25, 1998 at 13:51:13:

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK – If you’re concerned that your temporary staff is slacking off, don’t worry – a new Pace University study shows that contingent workers are just as motivated as permanent employees. New findings of the attitudes, behaviors and motivations of contingent workers shatter many popular myths about this sector of the labor force.

“Far from being less committed, less satisfied, less skillful than core employees, contingent workers frequently scored higher in such areas of this survey,” said Peter Allan, a professor of management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York. “Management should not overlook the potential of these workers. Despite lacking job security and other benefits, they certainly have the motivation to function productively.”

Allan surveyed 197 professional and technical workers – both core and contingent – about how they perceived their jobs. Then he assessed those attributes that are linked to motivation and performance, such as task significance, autonomy, skill variety and feedback. The Pace University study shows:

· Contingent workers scored higher in their ability to be self-motivated by their jobs. Possible reason: lacking permanent positions, contingents may have valued their jobs more; permanent workers may take their jobs for granted.
· Contingent workers scored significantly higher in task identity and job feedback. Possible reason: contingents are hired for tasks that are whole identifiable pieces of work and provide information about the effectiveness of their performance.
· Contingent workers scored higher in need for growth, suggesting that they were likely to respond more favorably to jobs that offered them challenges.

With the exception of job security, the core workers did not score significantly higher in any category, including in their satisfaction with compensation. In many cases, professional and technical contingent workers are paid better than full-time employees are.

“Generally, contingent workers do not enjoy the same kinds of benefits that full-time employees do, such as pensions or health insurance,” Allan said. “But in many cases, people choose to be contingent workers, because it allows them job flexibility. Often hired for a special project, they leave when the assignment is complete, thus freeing them to care for an aging parent or young children. This type of temporary work also can be ideal for a retired person who wants to keep a hand in the labor force.”

Businesses need to tailor work to be motivating to the contingent workers, and provide them direct feedback on their performance in order to maximize motivation and production, Allan said.

Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, with 5,500 students, offers undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degree programs, and hosts a number of research centers and institutes which extend its scholarship and teaching to a worldwide audience. The School is accredited by AACSB: the International Association for Management Education.