Ambassador of Tanzania to discuss “The Challenges Facing Africa” at the Lubin School

“The Challenges Facing Africa” will be presented by the Center for Global Finance in association with the Center for International Business Development and the Center for Global Business Strategy at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business.

February 12, 2003

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Pace University, (212) 346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY

WHAT: “The Challenges Facing Africa,” presented by the Center for Global Finance in association with the Center for International Business Development and the Center for Global Business Strategy at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business.

WHO: Mr. Daudi N. Mwakawago, Ambassador of Tanzania (East Africa), Extraordinary & Plenipotentiary and Permanent Representative to the U.N., will be the guest speaker. Amb. Mwakawago will discuss the political, cultural and economic challenges, changes and opportunities that Africa faces in the 21st century, particularly from a global perspective.

WHEN: Wednesday, February 12, 12:00 pm to 1:15 pm

WHERE: Pace University, Multipurpose Room, One Pace Plaza. (Use Spruce Street entrance. Room is on B level.)

Pace M.B.A. students to serve as finance consultants at Securities Arbitration Clinic

Pace M.B.A. students to serve as finance consultants for small investors helped by Securities Arbitration Clinic
of Pace Law School

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

Pace M.B.A. students to serve as finance consultants for small investors helped by Securities Arbitration Clinic
of Pace Law School

New initiative allows law student interns and M.B.A. students to collaborate and learn from each other

White Plains, New York – February 3, 2003 – Pace University’s Lubin School of Business is collaborating with the Securities Arbitration Clinic (SAC) of John Jay Legal Services, Inc. at Pace Law School to enrich the service and curricular strength of both programs. In this interdisciplinary endeavor, M.B.A. students of the Lubin School will serve as finance consultants to the SAC and provide expert financial opinions on transactions in the client brokerage accounts of the clinic.

The Securities Arbitration Clinic at Pace Law School provides assistance to small investors who are unable to obtain legal representation because of the small amount of their claims. Law students, under the supervision of a faculty member, represent brokerage firm customers in handling their disputes with broker-dealers that must be resolved in arbitration.

Typically, law firms are not willing to handle securities arbitration cases where the amount of the claim is less than $50,000. The SAC specializes in these kinds of cases, providing service to those in the community who have small claims and need legal assistance in disputing and resolving broker misconduct.

“This collaboration will provide SAC student interns access to financial analysis to better understand our clients’ claims of wrongdoing by brokers,” said Jill Gross, Visiting Professor of Law and co-director of the Securities Arbitration Clinic. “Students will be trained in working with consultants and experts, a key aspect of lawyering in almost any area of practice.”

In turn, the M.B.A. students will learn to decipher actual (rather than simulated) investors’ account statements, understand brokerage firm conduct and trading, and work with lawyers on substantive cases. Dr. Ronald Filante, associate professor and director of the Student Managed Investment Portfolio at the Lubin School, will supervise the M.B.A. students.

“We expect this interdisciplinary curriculum approach to be a tremendous benefit to our students,” said Dr. Filante. “The experience gained by the students in our clinic will be extremely valuable when pursuing careers in both law and finance. Furthermore, the interaction between faculty from the business and law schools of Pace fosters the community of spirit and purpose that characterizes all great institutions of higher learning.”

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart International Airport in New Windsor. More than 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School.

New Study Shows Mutual Fund Rating Services Possess Little Ability to Predict Winning Funds

Although mutual fund rating services state that their ratings should not be used as signals of future performance, the simple fact is that investors and financial consultants do use the ratings to choose funds in which to invest. A new study, conducted by researchers at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, concludes that mutual fund rating services like Morningstar and Value Line show little ability to predict winning funds, and cautions those who use ratings as signals of future performance.

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

New Study Shows Mutual Fund Rating Services Possess Little Ability to Predict Winning Funds

New York, New York – January 15, 2003 – Although mutual fund rating services state that their ratings should not be used as signals of future performance, the simple fact is that investors and financial consultants do use the ratings to choose funds in which to invest. A new study, conducted by researchers at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, concludes that mutual fund rating services like Morningstar and Value Line show little ability to predict winning funds, and cautions those who use ratings as signals of future performance.

“Investors should be very cautious about interpreting mutual fund ratings,” said Matthew Morey, Ph.D., associate professor of finance at the Lubin School and author of the study. “Ratings should be used as measures of past performance, and investors should remember that the ratings are of dubious help in terms of predicting future winning funds.”

The new Pace study examines two issues. First, the study documents the mutual fund ratings/rankings methodology of the Morningstar, Value Line and Lipper Analytical systems. Second, the study investigates the out-of-sample predictive ability of the Morningstar and Value Line ratings.

The findings are as follows:

1. Analyzing the ratings methodologies, the researchers find the Morningstar system “emphasizes expense, load and risk-adjusted returns where risk is defined as downside risk”. On the other hand, the Value Line system “emphasizes the persistence of fund performance, i.e., the ability of a fund to consistently out-perform other funds in terms of simple (non-expense, non-load, non-risk adjusted) returns. There is also a difference in the time horizons that the two systems examine: Morningstar uses a system that emphasizes a fund’s long-term performance (up to 10 years), while Value Line uses a shorter period of time (up to five years). While both Morningstar and Value Line rate mutual funds on a scale of 1 to 5, the Lipper Analytical system, conversely, separates funds into many styles that are determined by Lipper itself, and then ranks funds in each of the defined styles from top to bottom by their total return. Lipper does not provide any formal ratings for funds.”

2. In terms of the predictive ability of the Morningstar and Value Line ratings, the researchers use “an approach that is robust to survivorship bias and load-adjusted returns.” Furthermore, the researchers use four different measures of “out-of-sample” performance and also examine alternative ratings systems that are based on simpler methodology than the Morningstar and Value Line systems. The researches note three findings in this analysis:

a) “Neither of the ratings systems, nor the alternative ratings systems, are able to successfully predict winning funds. Specifically, the researchers find that the difference in out-of-sample performance between top-rated and median-rated funds is never significant with the correct signs and sometimes actually has the incorrect signs.”

b) “There is some ability using risk-adjusted measures to predict losing funds, as the lowest rated funds do have lower levels of out-of-sample performance than other funds.”

c) “There is some weak evidence that the Value Line system actually predicts future performance better than the Morningstar system. However, this result only holds for the poor performing funds and only for the Sharpe index and Jensen alpha performance metrics. The Morningstar system is able to better predict future performance using the more complicated 4-index alpha performance metric.”

This study appears in the current issue of the Journal of Investment Consulting. For a copy of the paper, email wcaldwell@pace.edu .

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart International Airport in New Windsor. More than 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School.

Poll: Majority of Westchester Residents See Decline in Corporate Ethics Standards

A recent survey conducted by Pace University’s Lubin School of Business shows the vast majority of Westchester County residents feel that there has been a decline in the standards of corporate ethics. The survey, designed by graduate students of the Lubin School, focused on the landscape of American corporate ethics, changes in perceptions about ethics standards, and asked questions about liability for the actions of executives and potential restitution.

PACE UNIVERSITY PUBLIC OPINION POLL SHOWS MAJORITY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY RESIDENTS SEE DECLINE IN CORPORATE ETHICS STANDARDS

Most Residents Feel Corporate Executives Should Be Held Criminally Liable For Reporting Misleading Financial Results

White Plains, New York – November 6, 2002 – A recent survey conducted by Pace University’s Lubin School of Business shows the vast majority of Westchester County residents feel that there has been a decline in the standards of corporate ethics. The survey, designed by graduate students of the Lubin School, focused on the landscape of American corporate ethics, changes in perceptions about ethics standards, and asked questions about liability for the actions of executives and potential restitution.

Several poll findings are of particular interest:

· In general, 97% of the respondents claim they were familiar with stories of corporate wrongdoing.

· When asked if American corporations were ethical in their business practices, 48% agreed, 39% disagreed and 13% were not sure. However, the majority, 70% female and 50% male, indicated there has been a decline in the standards of corporate ethics.

· There was no divide between the sexes on the issue of criminal liability. Nearly 83% of the participants indicated corporate executives should be held criminally liable for reporting misleading financial results. Fifty-nine percent felt the penalty should be a jail sentence in addition to a monetary fine. Eight percent thought that a jail sentence alone was sufficient, 18% were in favor of a monetary fine, while 9% were not sure.

· Eighty percent of male high school graduates and 53% of male college graduates felt corporations were ethical, compared to 36% of female high school graduates and 42% of female college graduates, respectively. Education levels had a marginal impact on the issue of penalty. Fifty percent of male high school graduates and 59% of male college graduates wanted both jail and monetary fines levied. A wider margin was found among females: 73% of female high school graduates and 55% of female college graduates agreed with their male counterparts.

· When asked about restitution, the majority (78%) want to see reimbursement to 401K’s, 11% did not think it was required and 11% were not sure.

“Further analysis of responses indicates that Westchester County residents have a dim opinion of corporate ethics overall and feel corporate executives should be held liable and provide restitution for their wrongdoing,” says James S. Gould, professor of marketing at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. “Regardless of age or sex, citizens are concerned about declining corporate ethics and want something done about it.”

The results of the survey are based on 198 responses from Westchester County residents. The survey was almost equally split between males (48.5%) and females (51.5%). Three-quarters of the respondents represent adults between the ages of 20 and 49; the majority hold either a college or graduate-level degree.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart International Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School.

Pace Candidates’ Performance Highly Rated

The National Association of State Boards of Accountancy’s 2002 edition of Candidate Performance on the Uniform CPA Examination lists Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in the top 10 nationwide among schools with the highest passing percentage for 20 or more first-time baccalaureate candidates passing all CPA exam sections. In May 2001, 29.4% of Lubin accounting students passed all parts of the CPA exam.

PACE CANDIDATES’ PERFORMANCE HIGHLY-RATED
Kudos from NASBA for Students Taking CPA Exam

New York, NY – October 7, 2002 – The National Association of State Boards of Accountancy’s 2002 edition of Candidate Performance on the Uniform CPA Examination lists Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in the top 10 nationwide among schools with the highest passing percentage for 20 or more first-time baccalaureate candidates passing all CPA exam sections. In May 2001, 29.4% of Lubin accounting students passed all parts of the CPA exam.

“This recognition from NASBA is further evidence of Lubin’s continued strength in accounting, the discipline upon which the School was founded,” said Arthur L. Centonze, dean of the Lubin School. “We are delighted that so many Pace baccalaureate candidates were successful in passing this rigorous exam on the first attempt.”

Founded as a school of accountancy in 1906, the Lubin School is a nationally-ranked leader in business education. Theory and practice are intrinsically intertwined in the curriculum and Lubin is widely-recognized for graduating students who are prepared to make an immediate contribution to the workplace.

In addition to this current recognition, Lubin’s BBA program is nationally-ranked by U.S. News and World Report and its part-time MBA program is ranked 10th nationwide (which is 2nd in New York City and 1st in Westchester County) in its “America’s Best Graduate Schools 2003” survey. Also, Strategic Finance ranks Lubin 3rd nationwide in the number of alumni passing the Certified Management Accountant Examination.

Lubin is accredited by AACSB International: The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, the premier accrediting organization for business schools in the world.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart International Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School.

World Trade Institute of Pace University Awarded International Service Recognition

The Manhattan Chamber of Commerce (MCC) held its 2001 Annual Business Awards Breakfast at the Citigroup Center on Wednesday, November 28. Among the many awards issued by the MCC including one to Donald Trump, the invited keynote speaker for Special City Vision, The World Trade Institute of Pace University (WTI) received an award for International Service recognition.

New York– The Manhattan Chamber of Commerce (MCC) held its 2001 Annual Business Awards Breakfast at the Citigroup Center on Wednesday, November 28. Among the many awards issued by the MCC including one to Donald Trump, the invited keynote speaker for Special City Vision, The World Trade Institute of Pace University (WTI) received an award for International Service recognition.

The MCC’s Annual Business Awards Breakfast honors prominent businesses and leaders for their contributions to the community. Donna Sharp, the Executive Director of the World Trade Institute, accepted the award for her efforts in spearheading World Trade Week 2001. One of the highlights of World Trade Week 2001 was the keynote speaker Grant Aldonis, United States Under Secretary of Commerce. The International Trade Alliance has nominated Donna Sharp as chairperson for the up-coming World Trade Week 2002. WTI is actively seeking sponsorship and partnership for the event.

The WTI is the distinguished non- profit organization in the field of international trade education. WTI hosts seminars for the business professionals, certificate programs in export and import, custom programs, and 11 different language courses.

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The World Trade Institute has been a primary training resource for the business and financial community for over 29years. WTI is committed to professional, comprehensive, experience-based training for individuals, companies and public agencies that operate in the global marketplace. www.wti.pace.edu

NASDAQ Helps Launch New Center for Global Finance at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business

The Nasdaq Stock Market® today honored Pace University’s Lubin School of Business for establishing its new Center for Global Finance. As part of the recognition, Jorge Pinto, the Center’s director, was on hand to open the Nasdaq’s trading day, at the Nasdaq MarketSiteSM on Times Square in New York City. Pinto punched the red button that ignites the MarketSite Wall, opening trading on Nasdaq for the week. Participating in the ceremony were Pace University President David A. Caputo and Lubin School of Business Dean Arthur L. Centonze.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
Director Jorge Pinto opens Nasdaq Stock Market, Dec. 11

NEW YORK, December 11, 2000 – The Nasdaq Stock Market® today honored Pace University’s Lubin School of Business for establishing its new Center for Global Finance. As part of the recognition, Jorge Pinto, the Center’s director, was on hand to open the Nasdaq’s trading day, at the Nasdaq MarketSiteSM on Times Square in New York City. Pinto punched the red button that ignites the MarketSite Wall, opening trading on Nasdaq for the week. Participating in the ceremony were Pace University President David A. Caputo and Lubin School of Business Dean Arthur L. Centonze.

“The new Center for Global Finance will capitalize on the Lubin School’s strategic location in the world’s financial capital, its academic expertise in finance and international business, and our relationships with alumni in the financial services industry,” said Dean Centonze. “The Center will enhance these strengths and serve as a vital link between the Lubin School and the global finance community.”

“We are fortunate to have Jorge Pinto join us as the director for the Center for Global Finance,” said Centonze. “He brings a wealth of international experience and ties to the business, political and academic communities worldwide.”

Jorge Pinto comes to the Lubin School from the Mexican Consulate in New York. During his time as Consul General, Pinto was responsible for implementing a general modernization and exponential expansion of the Consulate’s operations, such as the launch of the Mexican Government’s first Web site in 1995. Ambassador Pinto has offered conferences relating to Mexico’s current affairs and U.S.-Mexico relations. He spent two years as the executive director of the World Bank and three years as Ambassador of Mexico in Sweden.

“The Center will develop research and academic programs that respond to the challenges that the new and changing economic global environment is imposing on business today,” said Jorge Pinto.

In the summer of 1999, Pace University’s Lubin School of Business created one of the first campus-based trading and analysis rooms with support, in part, from a $50,000 in-kind gift from Nasdaq. It’s basic function is to simulate an actual Wall Street trading room, thus giving students exposure to financial data and risk management environments that exist in the real world. The facility contains Nasdaq Market Link and the Nasdaq Head Trader simulation, coupled with Bridge data to integrate the actual conduct of business with concepts taught in the classroom.

The Nasdaq MarketSite, which opened in December 1999, communicates to the world up-to-the-minute market information and provides public education on the financial markets. The Nasdaq Stock Market lists nearly 5,000 companies, has the largest dollar volume of trades of any financial market, and trades more shares per day than any other U.S. market. Current market capitalization is $5.34 trillion. Nasdaq is a subsidiary of the National Association of Securities Dealers, Inc. (NASD®), the largest securities-industry, self-regulatory organization in the United States.

Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, with 5,800 students, offers undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degree programs, and hosts a number of research centers and institutes that extend its scholarship and teaching to a worldwide audience. The School is accredited by AACSB: the International Association for Management Education.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. More than 13,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Pace University’s Lubin School of Business to Honor Alfred R. Wassler of Consolidated Edison, Dec. 1

Pace University’s Lubin School of Business will honor alumnus Alfred R. Wassler, vice president of purchasing at Consolidated Edison Company of New York, during the School’s Eighth Annual Lubin Alumni Achievement Award Luncheon. The event will begin at 11:45 a.m., Friday, December 1, at the Chase Manhattan Bank headquarters in New York City. Wassler graduated from Pace University in 1971.

Posted by Public Affairs on November 28, 19100 at 12:34:43:

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK – Pace University’s Lubin School of Business will honor alumnus Alfred R. Wassler, vice president of purchasing at Consolidated Edison Company of New York, during the School’s Eighth Annual Lubin Alumni Achievement Award Luncheon. The event will begin at 11:45 a.m., Friday, December 1, at the Chase Manhattan Bank headquarters in New York City. Wassler graduated from Pace University in 1971.

“His commitment and generous service to the school and to Pace University have been significant for many years,” Lubin School of Business Dean Arthur Centonze said of Wassler. “He is an alumnus well deserving of this honor.”

Each year the Lubin School of Business honors a graduate in recognition of his or her outstanding professional leadership achievements, demonstrated contributions in the areas of community service and social responsibility, and commitment to Pace University and Lubin.

Recent Alumni Service Awards also will be presented to Keyla Hernandez,’92 and ’95, Community Relations and Media Manager, New York State Department of Health; and Raquel Del Monte ’92, Senior Associate-Equity Operations, Nomura Securities.

The Chase Manhattan Bank and PricewaterhouseCoopers, LLP have provided major sponsorship for the luncheon. Proceeds from the luncheon fund the Lubin Alumni Achievement Award Scholarship, which provides support to a Lubin student who demonstrates academic achievement, financial need, leadership qualities and civic responsibility.

The Lubin School of Business, with 5,500 students, offers undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degree programs, and hosts a number of research centers and institutes, which extend its scholarship and teaching to a worldwide audience. The School is accredited by AACSB: the International Association for Management Education.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

James E. Quinn of Tiffany & Co. is Named Executive in Residence at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business

James E. Quinn, vice chairman of Tiffany & Co., has been named an Executive in Residence at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business for the fall 2000 term, announced the school’s dean, Arthur L. Centonze.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK – James E. Quinn, vice chairman of Tiffany & Co., has been named an Executive in Residence at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business for the fall 2000 term, announced the school’s dean, Arthur L. Centonze.

The Lubin School’s Executive in Residence Program provides an arena for senior executives from around the world and Lubin students and faculty to exchange ideas on contemporary business issues. Each year, chairmen, CEOs, presidents and other top executives from the world’s leading corporations spend a day on campus discussing business and career issues.

As vice chairman of Tiffany & Co., Quinn, a Pace University alumnus, is responsible for retail, corporate, and direct marketing sales worldwide. On Thursday, September 28 Quinn will be at Pace University’s New York City campus for a daylong program meeting with business students and faculty.

Quinn earned his B.A. in communications from Hofstra University and his M.B.A in financial management from Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. In 1986, James Quinn joined Tiffany & Co. as vice president responsible for corporate sales. He continued to advance within the organization and was promoted to senior vice president of the corporate division in 1990 and to executive vice president in 1992. In 1995 he was named to Tiffany’s Board of Directors, and was appointed to his present position in January 1998.

An active participant in several business and civic organizations, Quinn serves on the board of directors of BNY Hamilton Funds, Mutual of America Capital Management, and the Fifth Avenue Business Improvement District. He also serves on the advisory committee for the Business Council for the United Nations and the North American Advisory Board for the University College of Dublin. Quinn is also trustee of the Museum of the City of New York and the Montclair Art Museum.

Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, with 5,500 students, offers undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degree programs, and hosts a number of research centers and institutes which extend its scholarship and teaching to a worldwide audience. The School is accredited by AACSB: the International Association for Management Education.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Pace University’s Lubin School of Business Launches Visiting Scholar Program

Pace University’s Lubin School of Business has created the Lubin Distinguished Visiting Scholar Program to bring world-renowned academics to campus. The School expects to host Distinguished Visiting Scholars three times a year, said Dr. Arthur L. Centonze, Dean of the Lubin School, in announcing the new program.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK – Pace University’s Lubin School of Business has created the Lubin Distinguished Visiting Scholar Program to bring world-renowned academics to campus. The School expects to host Distinguished Visiting Scholars three times a year, said Dr. Arthur L. Centonze, Dean of the Lubin School, in announcing the new program.

The Scholars will spend up to a week on campus in an intensively organized program similar to Lubin’s Executive in Residence program. Visitors will be guest speakers in classes, meet with groups of students and faculty, and be honored guests at various receptions. The new program is operated by the Center for International Business Studies in cooperation with the various Lubin Departments, and is coordinated by Professor Eric Kessler of Lubin’s Department of Management.

The first Distinguished Visiting Scholar will be Riordan Roett, the Sarita and Don Johnston Professor and Director of the Western Hemisphere Program at the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University. He will be at Pace University’s New York City campus in lower Manhattan April 4-7, 2000. Professor Roett’s visit is jointly sponsored by the Center for International Business Development and Pace’s Brazilian Institute.

Roett received his Ph.D. in political science from Columbia University and is a leading authority on Latin American economics and politics in the United States. He is the co-author and editor of Brazil Under Cardoso, and has authored or edited books such as The Mexican Peso Crisis: International Perspectives, The Challenge of Institutional Reform in Mexico, Political and Economic Liberalism in Mexico, Brazil: Politics in A Patrimonial Society (fourth edition), Mexico’s External Relations in the 90s, and Mexico and the United States: Managing the Relationship. He has written for Foreign Affairs and other journals and newspapers.

Roett served as senior political analyst for International Capital Markets (1994-1995) and as director of international relations in the Western Hemisphere for Chase Manhattan Bank (1983-1994). He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a faculty fellow of the World Economic Forum in Geneva. He is also an independent director of nine Salomon Smith Barney investment funds.

Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, with 5,500 students, offers undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degree programs, and hosts a number of research centers and institutes which extend its scholarship and teaching to a worldwide audience. The School is accredited by AACSB: the International Association for Management Education.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.