Pace University Study Finds Pomegranate Effective in Fighting Viruses and Bacteria

If the answer to improved health through protection against common germs and pathogens was as simple as drinking pomegranate juice it seems everyone would be a lot healthier.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Cara Halstead, Public Information Officer, Pace University
914-773-3312 Office, 914-906-9680 Cell, chalstead@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY STUDY FINDS PURE POMEGRANATE JUICE AND POMEGRANATE LIQUID EXTRACT EFFECTIVE IN FIGHTING VIRUSES AND BACTERIA

100% Pomegranate juice and POMx liquid extract could significantly reduce microbes found in the mouth that commonly cause cavities, staph infections and food poisoning

NEW YORK, NY, May 22, 2007 – If the answer to improved health through protection against common germs and pathogens was as simple as drinking pomegranate juice it seems everyone would be a lot healthier.

Recent preliminary research by Milton Schiffenbauer, Ph.D., a biology professor at Pace University in New York, indicates it just might be that simple. The research revealed that 100% pomegranate juice and POMx liquid extract (pomegranate polyphenol extract), made from the Wonderful variety of pomegranate grown in California, have antiviral and antibiotic effects. His findings will be introduced May 22 at the American Society for Microbiology’s annual meeting in Toronto in a presentation entitled: “The Inactivation of Virus and Destruction of Bacteria by Pomegranate Juice.”

In this exploratory study, Schiffenbauer tested 100% pomegranate juice and POMx liquid extract and the effect each had on a bacterial virus T1 and several bacteria over various periods of time, in various conditions and with the addition of other ingredients. The titer of T1 virus,(a model system) which infects E.coli B decreased up to 100% within 10 minutes of the addition of 100% pomegranate juice or POMx liquid extract. The research was funded by Pace University and POM Wonderful LLC and was conducted using POM Wonderful pomegranate products.

Both were also found to be effective in the destruction of bacteria S. mutans, known to cause cavities, S. aureus, the most common cause of staph infections, and B. cereus, a common cause of food poisoning. Schiffenbauer’s findings also indicate that 100% pomegranate juice and POMx liquid extract inhibit the spread of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), having widespread implications in the treatment of these potentially pathogenic microorganisms.

The addition of the POM products to various oral agents, including toothpaste and mouthwash, gave these agents an antimicrobial effect.

This work comes on the heels of earlier studies conducted by Schiffenbauer that found that white tea and green tea extracts also have antimicrobial effects. According to Schiffenbauer, pomegranate has gotten even better results than the teas.

About POM Wonderful
POM Wonderful is the largest grower of the Wonderful variety of pomegranate. The company exclusively grows and sells this variety because of its exquisite sweet flavor, health benefits, large size and plentiful juice. POM Wonderful’s pomegranates are grown in Central California, in the sunny San Joaquin Valley. Fresh pomegranates are in season from October through January and November is National Pomegranate Month. In addition to selling the fresh fruit, the company also juices its fresh pomegranates to make POM Wonderful pomegranate juice and POMx. To learn more, visit http://www.pomwonderful.com.

About Pace University
For more than 100 years Pace University has been preparing students to become leaders in their fields by providing an education that combines exceptional academics with professional experience and the New York advantage. Pace has three campuses, in New York City, Westchester, and White Plains. A private metropolitan university, Pace enrolls nearly 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Plans for Queens School to be Built on Toxic Site to be Discussed Today at Pace

Pace University biology student Alessia Eramo, with her professor and mentor, James M. Cervino, Ph.D. and the chair of the Pace biology department, Richard Schlesinger, Ph.D., will be holding a town hall style meeting with the city’s School Construction Authority (SCA) and local government officials to discuss a proposed school in Queens to be built on a toxic site or “brownfield” and to present the results of studies they conducted at the site at the request of New York State Senator Frank Padavan. According to the Environmental Protection Agency’s website, brownfields are real estate “the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence … of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.”

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact:
Cara Halstead, Public Information Officer, Pace University
914-773-3312 Office, 914-906-9680 Cell, chalstead@pace.edu

PLANS TO BUILD A SCHOOL ON A TOXIC SITE IN QUEENS
TO BE DISCUSSED AT PACE UNIVERSITY

Analysis of the New York State Department of Conservation Clean-up proposal to be presented to city’s School Construction Authority by Pace researchers

NEW YORK, NY, April 11, 2007 – Pace University biology student Alessia Eramo, with her professor and mentor, James M. Cervino, Ph.D. and the chair of the Pace biology department, Richard Schlesinger, Ph.D., will be holding a town hall style meeting with the city’s School Construction Authority (SCA) and local government officials to discuss a proposed school in Queens to be built on a toxic site or “brownfield” and to present the results of studies they conducted at the site at the request of New York State Senator Frank Padavan. According to the Environmental Protection Agency’s website, brownfields are real estate “the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence … of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.”

To be called the Gateway School, the new structure is planned for a site on Goethals Ave. between 160th and 161st Streets in Jamaica, Queens.

WHAT: Presentation of toxicology research to the School Construction Authority and the public

WHEN: Thursday, April 12, 12:00pm

WHERE: Pace University, downtown New York City campus (near City Hall), 41 Park Row, Dyson Conference Room, 16th floor

WHO: Pace University researchers presenting to the city’s School Construction Authority, Queens government officials, and other concerned parties. This meeting is free and open to the public. Media admission is by press pass.

Cervino, a marine pathologist who is also a post doc researcher with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Cape Cod, MA, was asked by Senator Frank Padavan (R) NY to analyze the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) clean-up proposal of the site. Pace biology department chair, Richard Schlesinger, Ph.D., will also be on hand to answer questions regarding human health concerns pertaining to the site and the proposed sub slab depressurization system, designed to eliminate soil gas, to be installed after the toxins are removed.

BACKGROUND: Soil samples were collected in 2001 and 2002 and then again in 2005 and 2006 at the request of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). After a remedial action plan was developed by the SCA and input received from the NYSDEC, the plan was approved by the DEC. Recent soil vapor samples analyzed by the Pace researchers revealed hazardous chemical substances remain including fuel, medical waste and cleaning chemicals. Although there are provisions in the SCA plan for removing these hazardous substances, the Pace researchers have found additional issues that should be resolved to minimize the health risks associated with them.

White Tea better than green tea?

New studies conducted at Pace University, have indicated that White Tea Extract (WTE) may have prophylactic applications in retarding growth of bacteria that cause Staphylococcus infections, Streptococcus infections, pneumonia and dental caries. The effect of WTE was determined by observing zones of inhibition of bacteria grown on Mueller Hinton II Agar (Kirby-Bauer technique). In regard to bacterial virus inactivation, White Tea was more effective than green tea. Results obtained with the bacterial virus, a model system; suggest that WTE may have an anti-viral effect on human pathogenic viruses. The addition of White Tea Extract to various toothpastes enhanced the anti-microbial effect of these oral agents.

Contact: Mary E. Horgan 914-923-2798 mhorgan@pace.edu

White Tea better than green tea?
NEW STUDY SHOWS THAT WHITE TEA HAS AN INHIBITORY EFFECT ON VARIOUS PATHOGENIC BACTERIA, FUNGI AND BACTERIAL VIRUS.

Anti-Viral and Anti-Bacterial effect of Toothpaste is enhanced by adding White Tea Extract.

New York, NY – May 23, 2004 – New studies conducted at Pace University, have indicated that White Tea Extract (WTE) may have prophylactic applications in retarding growth of bacteria that cause Staphylococcus infections, Streptococcus infections, pneumonia and dental caries. The effect of WTE was determined by observing zones of inhibition of bacteria grown on Mueller Hinton II Agar (Kirby-Bauer technique). In regard to bacterial virus inactivation, White Tea was more effective than green tea. Results obtained with the bacterial virus, a model system; suggest that WTE may have an anti-viral effect on human pathogenic viruses. The addition of White Tea Extract to various toothpastes enhanced the anti-microbial effect of these oral agents.

Studies have also indicated that WTE has an anti-fungal effect on Penicillium chrysogenum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the presence of WTE, Penicillium spores and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells were totally inactivated. It is suggested that WTE may have an anti-fungal effect on pathogenic fungi.

“Past studies have shown that green tea stimulates the immune system to fight disease,” says Milton Schiffenbauer, Ph.D., a microbiologist and professor in the Department of Biology at Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts & Sciences and primary author of the research. “Our research shows White Tea Extract can actually destroy in vitro the organisms that cause disease. Study after study with tea extract proves that it has many healing properties. This is not an old wives tale, it’s a fact.”

Several findings in the new study are of particular interest:

• The Anti-Viral and Anti-Bacterial effect of white tea (Stash and Templar) is greater than that of green tea.

• The anti-viral and anti-bacterial effect of several toothpastes including, Aim, Aquafresh, Colgate, Crest and Orajel were enhanced by the addition of White Tea Extract.

• White tea extract exhibited an anti-fungal effect on both Penicillium chrysogenum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

• White Tea Extract may have application in the inactivation of pathogenic human microbes, i.e., bacteria, viruses, and fungi.

The results of this study will be presented at the 104th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology on May 23, New Orleans, Louisiana

Dr. Schiffenbauer can be reached at (212) 346-1968 or mschiffenbauer@pace.edu

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. (www.pace.edu)

Pace University Researchers Examine the Role of Black Teas in Attacking Viruses

In the last decade green tea has acquired a reputation as a holistic means of preventing various illnesses from cancer to cataracts. Recent research studies conducted by Dr. Milton Schiffenbauer and his students at Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts & Sciences have shown that black teas (blended, unblended and filtered, and unfiltered) and iced tea drinks like Snapple, Bigelow and Arizona, may actually destroy certain human viruses. Results also indicated that the anti-viral effects of some oral agents like toothpaste and mouthwash were enhanced by the addition of tea extract.

Contact: Mary E. Horgan
(914) 923-2798
mhorgan@pace.edu

New York, NY — In the last decade green tea has acquired a reputation as a holistic means of preventing various illnesses from cancer to cataracts. Recent research studies conducted by Dr. Milton Schiffenbauer and his students at Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts & Sciences have shown that black teas (blended, unblended and filtered, and unfiltered) and iced tea drinks like Snapple, Bigelow and Arizona, may actually destroy certain human viruses. Results also indicated that the anti-viral effects of some oral agents like toothpaste and mouthwash were enhanced by the addition of tea extract.

The results of this research are based on a model system using a bacterial virus, TI, which infects Escherichia coli B or “E-coli” as it is more commonly known. The research has shown that TI is inactivated by tea.
“Tea has long been believed to have medicinal properties; our results justify this belief,” said Dr. Schiffenbauer. “The most significant finding of our research to date indicates that tea extract has a very potent anti-viral effect on human viruses, i.e. Herpes Simplex type I and II.”

All teas originate from the Camellia sinesis plant. The only difference between the green, red and black teas is due to the fermentation process after the leaves are picked. All teas contain polyphenols or antioxidants that protect human cells from reactive atoms (free radicals) that are responsible for body tissue damage. Flavorids are the group of polyphenols that occur naturally in tea. It is suspected that the concentration level of these polyphenols in the body is responsible for the tea’s beneficial properties. Polyphenols may also contribute to the prevention of various types of cancer, including pancreas, colon, bladder, prostate, and breast.

Pace University’s Dyson College of the Arts & Sciences funded the research. Schiffenbauer and his students presented their findings at the 101st General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology in Orlando, Florida, May 21-22.

The Dyson College of Arts & Sciences offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in the arts, humanities and sciences, and guides the general education of all Pace University undergraduate students. The College’s teaching philosophy stresses a combination of classroom instruction, technology, practical experience and community service.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.