The Daily Tarrytown: Pace SAAC Raises Money for Make-A-Wish With Bingo

Pace University’s Student Athletic Advisory Committee held its sixth annual Bingo Night on Tuesday at Goldstein Health and Fitness Center and raised $2,600 for the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

From The Daily Tarrytown:

Pace University’s Student Athletic Advisory Committee held its sixth annual Bingo Night on Tuesday at Goldstein Health and Fitness Center and raised $2,600 for the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

More than 250 students and staff members took part in the fundraiser for Make-A-Wish, which is the charity of choice for all Division II schools. Lucio’s Pizza and Frank and Joe’s Deli provided free food to those in attendance.

The SAAC’s goal for the 2011-12 academic year is to raise $8,000, and Tuesday’s event brought the total so far to more than $6,000. This is the most that the SAAC has raised for Make-A-Wish in the history of Pace University.

The committee will be active in the next few weeks with community service events. If you are wondering what bingo we are talking about, have a look at the list of bingo sites from here. The SAAC will travel to the Bedford Road School on Saturday to assist the Pleasantville PTA in planting flowers in the courtyard of the school.

When Pace’s softball team hosts Bentley University on Sunday, the SAAC will launch the “Pace Goes Pink” breast cancer campaign for the spring season. Lacrosse will go pink on April 10, when the Setters host Adelphi University, while baseball will do so on April 22 against Assumption College.

The SAAC will participate in Relay for Life at Goldstein Fitness Center on April 20 and 21 and will host developmentally disabled children at a Pace baseball game on April 25.

Earlier this year, the committee partnered with Colleges Against Cancer and raised more than $2,500 for the Dickson Cancer Treatment Center in White Plains.

Read the original article here: Pace SAAC Raises Money for Make-A-Wish With Bingo | The Daily Tarrytown.

The Daily Pleasantville: Pace Athletics Names Eleventh Hall of Fame Class

The Pace University Department of Athletics named the five newest members of the Pace Athletics Hall of Fame.

The Pace University Department of Athletics named the five newest members of the Pace Athletics Hall of Fame.

Dennis Carpenter (football ’75), Katie Holden (softball ’01), Wanda Maynard-Morris (women’s basketball ’02), Marcus Mayus (lacrosse ’00) and Bob Scheinblum (men’s basketball ’61) make up the eleventh class in the history of Pace’s Hall of Fame and will be inducted with a ceremony on Tuesday, April 10 at 6 p.m. at the Tudor Room of Pace’s White Plains campus.

Carpenter was Pace’s quarterback from 1969 to 1974. He led the nation in total offense in his freshmen year, in which Pace won the Metropolitan Bowl. He earned MVP honors in both that game and the regular season. In his junior year, he led Pace’s top-ranked offense in terms of yardage. He led Pace to another win at the Metropolitan Bowl in his senior year. Carpenter was a teacher in Katonah from 1977 to 2005.

Holden was a four-time Northeast-10 All-Conference selection from 1998 to 2001 and a three-time member of the ECAC Division-II North All-Star Team. She made the CoSIDA Academic All-District team in her junior year and won the Woody Hayes Scholar-Athlete Award. She was Pace’s Letterwinner of the Year in her senior season. She now works as an attorney.

Maynard-Morris played from 1998 to 2002 and earned Northeast-10 All-Conference honors three times, along with ECAC All-Star Honors and Met Writers Association All-Star Honors. She was Pace’s Female Athlete of the Year in her junior season, in which she led Pace to the Elite Eight. She was the Pace Letterwinner of the Year and ECAC Player of the Year in her senior season. She is only the second player in Northeast-10 Conference history to be named Player of the Year and Defensive Player of the Year in the same season.

Mayus played lacrosse at Pace from 1996 to 1999. He earned Knickerbocker All-Conference honors in his freshman year and was Pace Athlete of the Year in his junior season. He was selected as Division II All-American and Northeast-10 All-Conference twice in his junior and senior years and earned Northeast-10 Player of the Year honors in his senior year. He now works as a doctor of internal medicine in Cos Cob, Conn.

Scheinblum was on the men’s basketball team from 1958 to 1961 and also played baseball at Pace. He was the captain of the basketball team in his senior year and was Pace Athlete of the Year. He graduated as Pace’s all-time leading scorer. He went on to be a lieutenant colonel in the United States Marine Corps and flew in 297 combat missions in Vietnam from 1967 to 1978. He won a gold medal and bronze medal at the Arkansas State Invitational Senior Olympics in 2000 and 2001, respectively, and averaged 20 points per game. He averaged 15 points per game in the 2001 National Senior Olympics. He retired as a captain and instructor for Delta Airlines in October 1999 and today volunteers as a pilot for Mercy MedFlight, a charitable air ambulance service.

Tickets for the event are $100 and are available here. 

From a report by Pace University Athletics/John M. Tagliaferri

Pace Athletics Names Eleventh Hall of Fame Class | The Daily Pleasantville.

Patch.com: Pace Basketball Team Spends Afternoon at Atria

In an article in the Pleasantville Patch, Sarah Studley reported that members of the Pace men’s basketball team traded an afternoon of studying and shooting hoops to spend time with residents of Atria Senior Living in Briarcliff Manor.

From Patch.com:

“The Pace players ran Bingo games, golf and putting competitions and scrabble games with the residents,” said Atria Engage Life Director Ryan Linehan in a statement. “The Pace players enthusiasm for working with our seniors was infectious and really brought out the best in our residents.”

“They were delightful,” said Toni Henry, an Atria resident after the Tuesday visit. “We had such a great time with them. They were all gentlemen and it was a real treat.”

The activities are part of an ongoing relationship between the volunteer members of the team and Atria that has been going on for the past four years.

Pauline Panvini, an Atria resident, said, “It was a good idea having the Pace players visit. It was a pleasant afternoon and we had fun!”

Read the original article here:

Pace Basketball Team Spends Afternoon at Atria – Pleasantville-Briarcliff Manor, NY Patch.

The Record: Where are they now? Hank Manning of Rutherford – NorthJersey.com

Hank Manning, a star catcher at Rutherford High School in the 1980s and a math major at Pace University, was preparing for life after baseball when a chance meeting became a life-changing encounter.

The Record newspaper in Bergen County, NJ profiled Pace University baseball coach Hank Manning on Monday, November 14, 2011.
 
From The Record:

Hank Manning considered becoming an engineer, but chose to develop baseball players instead of designing materials or structures.

Manning, a star catcher at Rutherford High School in the 1980s and a math major at Pace University, was preparing for life after baseball when a chance meeting became a life-changing encounter.

Helping out a friend, Manning was coaching a North Arlington Babe Ruth team in the summer of 1990. As it played a tournament in Syracuse, N.Y., Manning was approached by a professional scout, Rene Mons, who had seen him play for Pace and in the Cape Cod Baseball League.

“I kind of was a little bitter at baseball,” Manning said. “I ran into a scout and he said, ‘What are you doing?’ I said I was done with baseball; no one really wants me. He really encouraged me to start playing again. I did.”

Running into Mons led to a nine-year career in professional baseball as a player and coach, and ultimately Manning’s current position as head coach at Pace.

“It really was definitely a turning point,” Manning said. “If he didn’t tell me to keep working or stick it out, who knows where I would be. It was a good chance meeting.”

Manning, 43, believes he still would have coached somewhere voluntarily, but wouldn’t have had a career in baseball if not for the meeting that was much more than chance.

“Karma, fate, whatever you may want to say,” Manning said. “But I haven’t looked at my paycheck in 13 years to be honest with you.’’

Manning, who lives in Park Ridge with his wife, Kristen, and their children, Julia and Matthew, is in his 13th year at Pace, 11 as the Division II school’s head coach. Previously, he experienced the often roller-coaster life of professional ball.

Not being drafted as a junior – following a summer when his .292 average ranked in the top 20 in the Cape Cod League that featured future major league stars Frank Thomas, Mo Vaughn, Jeff Bagwell, Jeff Kent and Chuck Knoblauch – soured Manning.

But meeting Mons pushed Manning to play in the Met League and try out for the Reds, Indians and Pirates. He eventually got a deal with the Chicago White Sox with help from late scout Ed Ford of Jersey City.

Manning spent five years with the organization, reaching as high as Class AAA, and once played on the same team as Michael Jordan. Manning made national headlines by telling a Birmingham, Ala., newspaper he thought the basketball legend was taking away someone’s job. USA Today picked up the story.

“A couple of days later, Michael tapped me on the shoulder in a playful way and was joking with me about some of the comments,” Manning said. “That was my first introduction to make sure you know what you’re saying to the media.”

Manning’s White Sox career ended in 1995. He had two stints with Winnipeg in the Northern League and a brief one with the Red Sox organization before getting his first bench job.

Manning managed the Johnstown (Pa.) Steal to the Frontier League’s best record in 1997. After two years as the assistant general manager/coach of the New Jersey Jackals – the 1998 Northern League champs – Manning’s college coach Fred Calaicone called. He wanted someone he could groom as his successor, and Manning gladly returned to Pace.

Since becoming head coach in 2000, Manning is 235-303-3. Nine of his players have been drafted by major league teams, and five others play in independent leagues. He enjoys developing players, and runs Touch ’Em All Baseball Camp every summer at Pace.

It’s likely none of it would have happened if Manning hadn’t run into Mons.

“Baseball is a real funny game,” Manning said. “You could be on the outs and all of a sudden it could turn on a dime.”

Read full article on NorthJersey.com:

Where are they now? Hank Manning of Rutherford – NorthJersey.com.

Pleasantville Patch: Women’s Volleyball Turns It Around

After losing its first four matches, Pace University has turned things around, winning the last nine consecutive games. Pace Coach Karrin Moore, who is in her second year at the Pleasantville-based school after three years as an assistant at Bentley, credits the players on the team for the turn around.

After losing its first four matches, Pace University has turned things around, winning the last nine consecutive games.

Pace Coach Karrin Moore, who is in her second year at the Pleasantville-based school after three years as an assistant at Bentley, credits the players on the team for the turn around.

“It’s a new year,” Moore said. “Every time you get back in the gym, you just got to hope that everyone works as hard as you want them to and that they want it badly.”

This group of players does, according to Moore.

“It is a great group of girls who work really hard and they want to win,” Moore said. “They want to do what it takes, in practice, off the court and everything else to get there. I really lucked out in that they do all those things.”

Moore said the team members are great competitors.

“I like how hard they work,” Moore said. “The skill stuff we do at the beginning of practice. They know if they do that, then they can get into game play.”

Moore said now that she would love the team to keep up its level of play.

“There are a few teams out there that will give us a run for our money, especially if we are not playing at our best,” Moore said. “I would like to hopefully win our conference (Northeast-10) tournament this year. We made it to the finals last year, that was a great experience. Hopefully then we’ll go back to the NCAAs and go a little bit further than the first round, which we made last year.”

The Setters are in a position to achieve those things because of the talented corp of players on hand.

One of those players is junior libero and co-captain Elyse Rowland, who was named Northeast-10 Libero of the Week for Sept. 12-17. For the season, her 5.97 digs per set leads the Northeast-10 Conference and is sixth in the nation in Division II.

“She had a fantastic week that week,” Moore said. “In every match she had at least five digs, actually averaged 10 digs per set in one match. She goes hard all the time.”

Another key performer for Pace is junior middle blocker Tamilee Webb, who had a team high 13 kills in a 3-0 win against New York Tech Sept. 20. Webb is fourth in the conference with a .300 hitting percentage.

“Tami is short for a middle (5-foot-8) but she plays really big,” Moore said. “She is super athletic.”

Junior outside hitter Nora Rugova provides Pace with someone who is calm and doesn’t get rattled on the court easily, according to Moore.

Senior setter and co-captain Shea Hansen brings with her to the court a great knowledge of the game.

“She knows our players, she works hard to know the other team and makes good decisions on the court,” Moore said.

Freshman outside hitter Melanie Pavels plays a lot of beach volleyball, can read the game and has good court sense, Moore said.

Senior defensive specialist Ursula Vero gives Pace someone who is a solid defensive player. Vero is ninth in the conference in services aces per set at 0.53.

“Ursula has been a huge help this year,” Moore said. “She works hard on her game.”

The full story can be found here: http://pleasantville.patch.com/articles/womens-volleyball-pace-turns-it-around

New Jersey Herald: “North Warren alumnus is King of the hill at Pace”

Pace University Baseball pitcher Mackenzie King featured in the New Jersey Herald.

By Anthony Spaulding, New Jersey Herald

When he arrived on Pace University’s campus for his freshman year in 2006, Mackenzie King received some insight from head coach Henry Manning as to how his baseball career would unfold.

“Coach told me it was gonna be a roller coaster of a ride,” the former North Warren star recalled. “There’s gonna be a lot of ups and a lot of downs. But you want to finish on top.”

Four years later, the redshirt senior pitcher has climbed his way to the top of Pace’s rotation, putting together a 3-2 record with a 3.00 ERA and 54 strikeouts. In addition, the right-hander also has tossed two complete-game shutouts and become the school’s all-time leader in strikeouts with 205.

“I feel good,” King said of his season. “I want to make sure I get better.”

King didn’t look like he needed to improve when he stepped on the mound as a freshman, posting a 5-2 mark with a 1.43 ERA and 43 strikeouts in 32 innings as a reliever. His wins and strikeouts represented records for a Pace freshman, and his ERA was second best among freshmen all-time.

In his sophomore season, King made 22 appearances (two as a starter) while going 3-3 with a 1.88 ERA and fanning 80 in 52 innings. His strikeouts ranked fifth in the Northeast-10 Conference and he also earned a spot on the all-conference second team.

“My first two years were a big up,” King said.

But all of a sudden, he experienced a huge downer.

While playing in the Coastal Plains League in Virginia during the summer of 2008, King heard a “click” in his throwing shoulder after throwing a changeup. The day after his pitching appearance, he couldn’t pick up a ball due to the pain.  
“It kind of swelled up on me,” King said.

King later learned it was a partial tear in his labrum that required arthroscopic surgery on it. He attributed the injury to too much throwing.

“I threw 52 innings in my sophomore year and I was getting an inning or two pretty much every game,” King said. “It was just wear and tear on my shoulder.”

King rehabilitated the shoulder for a full year, forcing him to redshirt status to keep his four years of eligibility intact. King said the hardest part about the healing process was the mental aspect.

“It was a huge battle,” King said. “You feel like it is all right, but then it might hurt and you are not sure if you should throw. You just keep hoping the next day it feels better.”

King thought he got better when it came time for his junior season, saying how he got his speed back on most of his pitches. He believed in his ability so much that he switched from a full-time reliever to a starter.
However, his results spoke otherwise.

King appeared in only nine games, starting six, to finish the year at 1-6 with a 8.60 ERA while totaling 301⁄3 innings. He also collected only 28 strikeouts while allowing 29 earned runs on 45 hits.

“I’m not sure if I was 100 percent mentally ready,” King recalled. “It showed during the games. I didn’t feel like I could throw inside on anybody and I got hit around. I wasn’t used to that at all.”

Manning said it was tough to watch King pitch at less than 100 percent.

“If you look at the numbers, they weren’t MacKenzie King-like,” Manning said. “It wasn’t what we saw the first two years.”

Manning and pitching coach Grisha Davida suggested to King in the offseason to change his delivery from mostly an “all-arm” approach to a more balanced one using his entire body. However, the biggest adjustment Manning said was to have him space out his stamina.

“He was running out of gas,” Manning said. “Coming from a reliever (to a starter), he went hard for one inning. I think the pitching coach and I helped him realize to not waste your bullets the first time you’re out there.”

King hasn’t wasted any pitches this year, especially during the week from April 3-10, when he fired his two complete-game shutouts against The College of St. Rose and Assumption College. King allowed six hits and struck out a career-high 15 in the Setters’ 9-0 win over St. Rose and followed it up with a 10-strikeout performance while giving up nine hits in a 1-0 blanking of Assumption.

The win over Assumption was special because it put King at 202 career strikeouts to surpass Dustin Corbett’s (2005-08) school record of 199. King said it was nice to break the mark, but he said he is focused on developing his post-graduate career.

“I want to play this summer and continue playing after school,” King said. “I’m gonna play wherever I can.”
If King wants to have a future in baseball when he leaves Pace, he will have to listen to another piece of advice from Manning.

“He just has to be diligent in doing it,” Manning said. “He’s got to pursue it.”

Click here for the full release http://www.njherald.com/story/news/042411College-BAS-King

NEWS RELEASE: Pace Student Athletes Help Raise $3,100 for the Make-A-Wish Foundation

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, March 31, 2011- The fifth annual Student Athletic Advisory Committee (SAAC) Bingo Night was a huge success on Tuesday night in the Goldstein Health and Fitness Center. In total $3,100 was raised for Make-A-Wish Foundation, the chosen philanthropy of all Division II Institutions. More than 350 students and staff participated in the event, which featured free food from Lucio’s Pizza and Frank & Joe’s Deli.

PLEASANTVILLE, NY- The fifth annual Student Athletic Advisory Committee (SAAC) Bingo Night was a huge success on Tuesday night in the Goldstein Health and Fitness Center. In total $3,100 was raised for Make-A-Wish Foundation, the chosen philanthropy of all Division II Institutions. More than 350 students and staff participated in the event, which featured free food from Lucio’s Pizza and Frank & Joe’s Deli.

The SAAC goal for the academic year was $3,000 and with last night’s fundraiser, the SAAC total for the 2010-11 school year soared over $5,000. This is the largest total for Make-A-Wish that the Pace SAAC has raised in its history. Shea Hansen, SAAC President and a member of the women’s volleyball team expressed her excitement by saying “It was a great night for all Pace students and I am proud of our executive board for putting together such a successful event”.

In the upcoming weeks, SAAC will be busy with four remaining events to finish the semester. SAAC is currently holding a clothing drive along with a bake sale to raise funds to buy essential supplies to support the relief efforts in Japan. SAAC and the Pace Athletics Department will be recognizing the 167 student-athletes on April 6th who were named to the Northeast-10 Conference Commissioner’s Honor Roll as a part of National Student-Athlete Day during common hour. Also, a co-sponsored Powder Puff game with Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc. to raise money for the DJ Henry Dream Fund will be held on April 16th. Lastly, SAAC will be participating in Relay for Life which will be held in the Goldstein Fitness Center on April 29th.

D.J. Henry’s Boston Memorial Service Gets Broad Media Attention

ASSOCIATED PRESS AND A MEDIA MULTITUDE: “Hundreds mourn athlete shot by police.” Head Coach Chris Dapolito was the second person quoted in the Associated Press story about the inspiring memorial service for DJ Henry in Boston attended by 175 Pace students, faculty and staff members and an estimated crowd of 2000. ”There is no cure for how you feel, but there is a treatment for dealing with it. … You must find a way to pick up where D.J. left off and promise to do all that he would have done with his life,” Dapolito said. Read more.

Danroy Henry's parents, Danroy Sr. and Angella Henry, during Friday's memorial service. AP Photo/ STEPHAN SAVOIA

The memorial service was covered by a media multitude including three Boston TV channels, New York stations WCBS-TV, WPIX-TV, along with print and web media such as The Associated Press, The Huffington Post, Boston Globe, Boston Herald, Brockton Enterprise, Tacoma (WA) News Tribune, The Journal News, Enterprisenews.com, the FanHouse  website (with observations about the football team), Sports Channel News, and The Chappaqua Patch.

Head Coach Chris Dapolito was the second person quoted in the Associated Press story (and the first in the NY Daily News story) about the inspiring service at a convention center in Boston, which was  attended by 175 Pace students, faculty and staff members and an estimated crowd of 2,000.

”There is no cure for how you feel, but there is a treatment for dealing with it. … You must find a way to pick up where D.J. left off and promise to do all that he would have done with his life,” Dapolito said.

For video coverage of the memorial, click here.

For a video tribute to D.J. on thebostonchannel.com, click here.

For the full AP article, read below or click here.

Hundreds in Mass. mourn athlete shot by NY police

By JAY LINDSAY
Associated Press

BOSTON (AP) — He was a little boy beaming under Mickey Mouse ears. He was a driven college football player nicknamed Smooth and had a wrist tattoo that read “Family First.” He was an incredibly slow eater.

Photos, family and friends portrayed different sides of Danroy “D.J” Henry at his memorial service Friday in Boston, less than two weeks after he was shot to death in his car by police in suburban New York.

Conflicting stories and confusion surround his death, but no one mourned the 20-year-old Henry as a victim Friday.

“We are gathered to celebrate the life of D.J. Henry. Let me say it again, we are here to celebrate his life,” pastor Gideon A. Thompson of Jubilee Christian Church said to applause on what would have been Henry’s 21st birthday.

An estimated 2,000 people attended the service in a ballroom at the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, including childhood friends, college teammates and classmates at Pace University and U.S. Sen. Scott Brown of Massachusetts.

Speakers told of Henry’s faith and devotion to others and asked the audience to honor him by how they live.

“There is no cure for how you feel, but there is a treatment for dealing with it. … You must find a way to pick up where D.J. left off and promise to do all that he would have done with his life,” said Pace University coach Chris Dapolito.

Henry, of Easton, was shot by police who were responding to a disturbance that spilled outside a Thornwood, N.Y. bar on Oct. 17.

Police have said an officer knocked on the window of a car Henry was driving, and he drove away and hit two officers. But passengers said Henry was trying to move his car out of the fire lane and wasn’t a threat to police.

A law enforcement official said Henry’s blood alcohol level was above the legal limit to drive at the time. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the autopsy report hadn’t been released.

The attorney for Henry’s family questioned that and is conducting separate blood tests.

Earlier Friday, the lawyer, Michael Sussman, said a police officer was not in harm’s way when he fired the first shot at Henry. Sussman said a ballistics expert he hired determined the same officer fired at least three shots, one into the hood and two into the windshield.

Sussman said the angle of the shot into the hood indicates it was fired from the side and that it would have come first since the officer was on top of the hood when he fired twice into the windshield.

Lucian Chalfen, a spokesman for the Westchester County District Attorney’s office, declined to comment because the investigation is ongoing.

At the memorial, some speakers referred to the cloud around Henry’s death, with Thompson calling Henry a “young man that has been snatched away from us, his life snuffed out like a candle.” Henry’s uncle Kevin Murphy sang in lyrics he wrote for Henry: “What makes men do the evil that they do? How the hell did they disrespect you?”

His mother, Angella Henry, told the audience, “As we continue to fight for the truth, we will continue to need your love and support.”

But most of the service focused on Henry’s personality and life up until the night of the shooting.

Childhood pictures of Henry – at the beach, showing off a Burger King crown, buried in bubbles in a tub – flashed on a screen as mourners walked in.

His friend Desmond Hinds, who was in the car the night of the shooting, recalled hours sitting with Henry as he ate his meals with excruciating slowness. “He wanted to digest his food, that’s what he said,” Hinds said.

His younger sister, Amber, shared an essay she’d written in junior high about how her oldest brother was her hero. His younger brother, Kyle, talked about his brother’s closet full of stylish shoes and how he’d keep Kyle looking good, dropping piles of clothes on the floor when he visited and announcing, “Hand-me-downs!”

“I just smiled because I knew it was coming,” Kyle said.

Speaking at a lectern draped with a cloth with Henry’s Pace football number, 12, his father, Dan Henry, talked about how he’d worn the number during his days playing basketball, and his son adopted it after seeing a picture of him wearing it. It became a symbol of how important family was to his son, he said.

His father said the family still feels his presence.

“That’s what sustains us now,” he said.

Looking out at the large crowd, he added, “Even though he didn’t want to have a big 21st birthday, he’s going to.”

Associated Press writer Jim Fitzgerald in Valhalla, N.Y., contributed to this report.

(This version CORRECTS the name of the slain athlete’s uncle to Kevin Murphy, not Dan Murphy.)

NEWS RELEASE: Live Web Coverage of DJ Henry Pre-Game Tribute Announced by Pace University, University of New Haven

Live web-stream video and radio coverage is available this afternoon of the home football game against University of New Haven beginning with a bagpipe rendition of “Amazing Grace” and moment of silence honoring Danroy (“DJ”) Henry. The simple pre-game ceremony was scheduled before the game where Henry’s Pace University teammates resume their season after his death. (Left: Both sides of the Pace logo near the end posts on the football field have a paw print painted with the number 12 inside in honor of DJ.)

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, October 30, 2010 – Live web-stream video and radio coverage is available this afternoon of the home football game against University of New Haven beginning with a bagpipe rendition of “Amazing Grace” and moment of silence honoring Danroy (“DJ”) Henry. The simple pre-game ceremony was scheduled before the game where Henry’s Pace University teammates resume their season after his death. Last Saturday’s game was canceled.

Video is at mms://realserv.pace.edu/live.

The broadcast starts 30 minutes before the 12:45 pre-game ceremony. Kickoff at 1 pm. Broadcasts are free but viewers may encounter buffering issues due to heavy traffic.

Live radio coverage is provided by station WNHU-FM, 88.7, of the University of New Haven, streamed at http://www.wnhu.net/?dest=home.

Live statistics will be available at http://www.pacesettersathletics.com/landing/081509_fball_broadcast.

Team members are wearing black wristbands with Henry’s number, 12, woven into the fabric. To symbolize the loss of Henry its first defensive play will be executed with one player missing. The three remaining games of the season are dedicated to Henry.

Coach Chris Dapolito and several players will hold a post-game news conference about the game.

Contacts

John Tagliaferri, Pace Sports Information, cell 914-424-6126, jtagliaferri@pace.edu

Cara Cea, Pace Public Information, cell 914-906-9980, ccea@pace.edu

About Pace Athletics

Pace University has played football since 1978. Pace sponsors 19 intercollegiate sports in the NCAA Division II. The Setters compete primarily as a member of the Northeast-10 Conference. Players are drawn by Pace’s well-rounded program, career-oriented academics, and location in the New York metropolitan area. The University fields teams on its Pleasantville Campus in baseball, basketball, cross country, football, golf, lacrosse, swimming, diving, tennis, track and field, equestrian, soccer and volleyball.

About Pace University

For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

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