The Journal News, The Huffington Post, MidHudson News Network, WPAP: Pace experts speak to media about Boston explosions

Pace has provided expert sources to news media as the public tries to make sense of the tragedy in Boston.

Pace has provided expert sources to news media as the public tries to make sense of the tragedy in Boston.

Joe Ryan was interviewed by The Journal News, Mid-Hudson News Network and WPAP, a Clearchannel radio station in Florida.

From The Journal News: “Joseph Ryan, a former New York Police Department officer who is now chairman of the homeland security graduate program at Pace University, said people can’t just rely on police to spot something. “The only way we can fight back is we all have to get involved,” he told The Journal News. “Constant vigilance in a free society is a necessary task that we all must undertake.”

Richard Shadick was interviewed by The Portland Press Herald in Portland, Maine. “Richard Shadick, director of the counseling center at New York’s Pace University, said there are similarities to 9/11 in the public’s feelings of uncertainty. “I think there is a sense of dismay now, too, though, that this doesn’t just happen in New York or Washington,” he said. Shadick said proximity plays a role in people’s feelings, too. People in Maine are likely to be affected differently than people in, say, Idaho. “But I do think these events become a permanent part of our collective consciousness,” he said.

Anthony Mancini was interviewed by the Huffington Post. “Letting children verbalize their concerns can help blunt the impact of their feelings, said Anthony Mancini, a Pace University psychology professor who focuses on grief and trauma. “Children do have the capacity to bounce back, and experiencing something horrific like the Boston Marathon … is not a sentence of trauma by any stretch at all,” he said. “Most children will do fine in the way that most adults would do fine.” While children who witnessed the explosion first-hand could face some degree of post-traumatic stress disorder, Mancini said, children are often resilient and bounce back.”

 

NEWS ADVISORY: Pace Presents The Good Life – Your Guide to Living a Life You Love

The first event in the Pace University spring lecture series will be “The Good Life: Your Guide to Living a Life You Love,” a panel discussion on Thursday, March 8, 6:30pm – 8:30pm on Pace’s Pleasantville campus

Panel discussion March 8 at 6:30pm at Pace University Kessel Student Center, Pleasantville Campus

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, February 29, 2012 – What’s the secret to sustaining balance in a fast-moving society? What defines a “Good Life” and how do we get it?

These questions will be explored at the first event in the Pace University spring lecture series. “The Good Life: Your Guide to Living a Life You Love” will be a panel discussion on Thursday, March 8, 6:30pm – 8:30pm on Pace’s Pleasantville campus in the Gottesman room of the Kessel Student Center, 861 Bedford Rd., entrance 3. The event is free and open to the public. Media admission by press pass.

The panel discussion will be led by faculty member Ross Robak, Ph.D., chair of psychology and mental health counseling and director of the Master of Counseling program for Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace. Robak will be joined by Pace psychology professors Anthony Mancini, Ph.D., and Paul Griffin, Ph.D.; Susan L. Maxam, University Director for Student Success from the Center for Academic Excellence at Pace; and financial expert Rosario Girasa, J.D., of Pace’s Lubin School of Business.

The evening’s panel discussion and Q&A will examine how to build a healthy, happy life – spiritually, mentally, physically and financially. The panel will explore society’s tendency toward increasingly busy lives made more complex by relationships, career ambitions, financial obligations and even technology. Technology allows for constant communication but comes with the burden of not being able to detach.

To RSVP, e-mail PaceCounseling@Pace.edu.

Future lectures in the spring series will include an Earth Month event in April on wildlife in Westchester and one in May on a documentary film, produced by Pace students, on the cork industry.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

The New York Times: A Postwar Picture of Resilience – NYTimes.com

Pace psychology professor Anthony Mancini wrote an Op-ed on post-war resilience that was published in The New York Times in print and online on February 6.

Pace psychology professor Anthony Mancini wrote an Op-ed that was published in The New York Times in print on February 6, 2012, on page A23 of the New York edition with the headline: A Postwar Picture of Resilience.

Here’s what appeared in print and online:

WHEN the United States announced last week that its combat troops in Afghanistan would be withdrawn by mid-2013, there was obvious relief. But it was followed by familiar concerns.

One of the biggest of those concerns is the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder among the tens of thousands of returning veterans, which according to some media reports runs as high as 35 percent. These reports have incited fears that we will soon face a PTSD epidemic. But are such fears justified?

According to mounting scientific evidence, they are not. In fact, the prevalence of PTSD among veterans of recent wars is about 10 percent — substantially lower than is commonly believed. Indeed, the picture emerging is one of remarkable psychological resilience among the military.

This story of resilience has been ignored, partly because many assume that humans are inherently vulnerable to trauma. That belief makes us receptive to messages, most delivered by the media, that reinforce this perspective.

A growing body of scientific research, though, is telling another story: in short, that a traumatic event does not necessarily sentence a person to PTSD. Although an exact figure cannot be determined, a series of population-based studies has provided estimates that it occurs in just 5 percent to 20 percent of service members deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, with most studies hovering around 10 percent. In a representative study soon to be published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, my colleagues and I examined stress responses among more than 7,000 members of all United States service branches, before and after their deployments. The respondents were not seeking treatment and were representative of the military as a whole. Perhaps most important, their reports were confidential and had no bearing on their military careers.

About 83 percent of respondents showed a pattern of resilience: they exhibited a normal-range ability to cope with stress both before and after deployment. By contrast, fewer than 7 percent showed signs of PTSD following deployment. Surprisingly, these numbers improved among those with multiple deployments, with 84.9 percent showing resilience and only 4 to 5 percent with PTSD. Predictably, those with more severe combat experiences, like witnessing death and injury to others, were at greater risk.

Statistics like these are unlikely to generate headlines for understandable reasons. We do not want to stigmatize those with the disorder. Nor do we want to suggest that war is easily managed or that the problem is not of the utmost importance. Even an estimate of 1 in 10 represents a public health issue of the first magnitude, requiring our full attention and resources.

War exacts immense demands on the human capacity to cope, but a forthright recognition of our capacity for resilience does no disservice to the afflicted.

With these challenges ahead of us, we should remember that PTSD is a treatable condition and that a realistic and informed understanding of our inherent coping abilities can only assist treatment and, perhaps one day, even prevention of this debilitating disorder.

Anthony D. Mancini is an assistant professor of psychology at Pace University.

A version of this op-ed appeared in print on February 6, 2012, on page A23 of the New York edition with the headline: A Postwar Picture of Resilience.

A Postwar Picture of Resilience – NYTimes.com.

Globe and Mail: “Catastrophic loss, and the resilience of the human psyche

Professor Anthony Mancini was mentioned in a Globe and Mail article regarding the resilience of the human psyche after trauma and loss.

Professor Anthony Mancini was mentioned in a Globe and Mail article regarding the resilience of the human psyche after trauma and loss. From the article:

While anecdotes are perfect ways to transmit the human dimension of catastrophes, they’re hardly scientifically sound ways to measure their impact. An exhaustive review of the research literature by Professor Bonanno and two colleagues (Maren Westphal of Columbia, and Anthony Mancini of Pace University), published last November, shows that although individuals vary in their reactions to natural disasters, resilience is the human norm.

Tokyo, Japan after the earthquake and tsunami (Picture taken from Globe and Mail)