May 3 All-Day Symposium on Polymath Artist/Writer Patrick Ireland, Brian O’Doherty

“Patrick Ireland/Brian O’Doherty remains under-recognized, though he is a significant contemporary artist and author with more than 40 one-person shows in the US and abroad and had a much-praised career retrospective exhibition in 2006 in Ireland,” says Christopher Cahill, director of the Pace University Institute for American Irish Studies. “This symposium should illuminate his multifarious, interrelated gifts — and even his puckish humor.”

Media contacts
Christopher Cahill, Executive Director, Pace American Irish Institute
212-346-1574, cell 917-952-0141, ccahill@pace.edu
Christopher T. Cory, Pace Public Information, 212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164

PACE SYMPOSIUM TO PROBE PATRICK IRELAND/BRIAN O’DOHERTY,
PROTEAN POLYMATH OF THE ARTS

International symposium May 3 to explore links between
work of acclaimed artist and writer and that of artists as diverse as
Marcel Duchamp, James Joyce, and Borromini

New York, NY, April 30, 2007 — “Patrick Ireland/Brian O’Doherty remains under-recognized, though he is a significant contemporary artist and author with more than 40 one-person shows in the US and abroad and had a much-praised career retrospective exhibition in 2006 in Ireland,” says Christopher Cahill, director of the Pace University Institute for American Irish Studies. “This symposium should illuminate his multifarious, interrelated gifts — and even his puckish humor.”

So, who is Patrick Ireland/Brian O’Doherty and why the two names?

• As a painter, he sometimes runs strings through art galleries to create abstract shapes that recombine as a viewer walks around them.
• He helped develop the avant-garde Conceptual art movement.
• His works are owned by museums like the Metropolitan Museum of Art, MOMA and the Centre Pompidou.
• He’s the former art critic of The New York Times and the “Today” show.
• He’s a novelist whose “The Deposition of Father McGreevie” was short-listed for the UK’s famed Booker Prize in 2000.
• He created major public television series like American Masters and Great Performances as a senior official of the National Endowment for the Arts.
• The dual names arise because he is an Irish patriot whose real name is Brian O’Doherty but who has vowed to exhibit his art under the name “Patrick Ireland” until “until such time as the British military presence is removed from Northern Ireland.”

He will soon be accorded an all-day symposium on his work in the Multipurpose Room of Pace University’s downtown New York City campus, 1 Pace Plaza near City Hall (enter on Spruce St.), from 10 am to 5 pm on Thursday, May 3. Presented by the Pace University Institute for American Irish Studies, US and international critics and scholars will explore links between Ireland/O’Doherty’s art and writing and the works of other cultural pioneers.

The program is free and open to the public. The full schedule can be found at page.cfm?doc_id=16017. Lunch will be available in the University cafeteria. Reservations are suggested at 212-346-1593 or ccahill@pace.edu. The symposium is supported by grants from the Luce Foundation and Ethelyn A. Chase, Chair Emerita of the American Academy of Poets.
The symposium will be introduced by Lynn Gumpert, Director of the Grey Art Gallery at NYU and moderated by Christopher Cahill, Executive Director of the Institute for American Irish Studies at Pace University. Speakers will include, among others, Martin Filler, independent critic, on Ireland’s Rope Drawings; Liam Kelly, Professor of Visual Culture, University of Ulster, Belfast, on Ireland’s performative Vowel Grid; Christina Kennedy, Senior Curator: Head of Collection, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, on Ireland and Borromini; James McManus, Professor of Art History, California State University at Chico, on Ireland and Duchamp; Brenda Moore-McCann, independent scholar and critic, on aesthetics and conceptual art; Whitney Rugg, Ph.D. candidate, University of Chicago, on O’Doherty and the National Endowment for the Arts; and Gemma Tipton, independent critic, on Ireland’s Casa dipinta in Todi, Italy. Program notes are being written by Patricia Hamill, a professor in the Pace University English department.
Twelve-week mini festival. The Pace symposium, evocatively titled “One Here Now: The Art and Writing of Patrick Ireland/ Brian O’Doherty,” is the largest event in a 12-week US retrospective on the artist that began April 17 with an exhibition at NYU’s Grey Art Gallery (through July 14) accompanied by gallery talks, lectures, and performances by the author of his “Vowel Poems” and a “Structural Play.” Information on NYU events at www.nyu.edu/greyart.

With a digital art gallery, three conventional galleries, and expanding programs in fine and performing arts, for more than 100 years Pace University has been preparing students to become leaders in their fields. A Pace education combines exceptional academics with professional experience and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. Pace has three campuses, in New York City, Westchester, and White Plains. A private metropolitan university, Pace enrolls nearly 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Note: Media admission requires press pass. Media registration through Christopher Cahill (addresses above)

“The Globalization of Ireland”

In a special lecture sponsored by The Institute for American Irish Studies at Pace University, author and acclaimed international business journalist Michael J. O’Sullivan will provide insight into Ireland’s great leap forward from developing to postindustrial economy, and how it became one of the great globalization success stories.

MEDIA ALERT

Why Irish Eyes Are Smiling …
Acclaimed Author and International Journalist
Michael J. O’Sullivan Discusses
“The Globalization of Ireland” –
Pace University, November 30, 6 PM

Ireland is both the “happiest” nation in the world (ranked by Economist Intelligence Unit) and one of the great success stories for globalization. But WHY? Can it last? Can the U.S. learn from it?

In a special lecture sponsored by The Institute for American Irish Studies at Pace University, author and acclaimed international business journalist Michael J. O’Sullivan will provide insight into Ireland’s great leap forward from developing to postindustrial economy, and how it became one of the great globalization success stories. Specifically:

• Challenges which continue to face Ireland and Irish society due to globalization
• What other countries, particularly the U.S., can learn from Ireland
• What globalization means to Ireland and how it has changed the country
• Secrets of Ireland’s success
• Special relationship between Ireland and the United States
• Key role of the U.S. in the globalization of Ireland

When: Thursday, November 30, 2006 at 6 p.m.

Where: Pace University, One Pace Plaza, New York (across from City Hall)

Who: Michael J. O’Sullivan is the author of the book “Ireland and the Global Question,” published in the United States by Syracuse University Press (and in Ireland by Cork University Press). O’Sullivan appears weekly on major business stations such as CNBC, Bloomberg, CNN and on the BBC World Service radio. He has written op-ed articles in international newspapers including The Wall Street Journal Europe. Educated at UCC and Bailliol College, Oxford, O’Sullivan has taught economics at Princeton University. He currently works in the City of London.

Contact (General Public) – Christopher P. Cahill, The Institute for American Irish Studies at Pace University, 212-346-1574, ccahill@pace.edu

Contact (Media Relations) – Samuella R. Becker, Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1637, sbecker2@pace.edu

American Irish Institute Opens with Stanley Crouch

The eminent author, New York Daily News columnist and jazz critic Stanley Crouch will deliver the keynote address at the opening ceremony of the Institute for American Irish Studies at Pace University.

STANLEY CROUCH TO OPEN PACE UNIVERSITY INSTITUTE FOR AMERICAN IRISH STUDIES
OCTOBER 11, 2005

“American is always the issue”

WHO: The eminent author, New York Daily News columnist and jazz critic Stanley Crouch will deliver the keynote address at the opening ceremony of the Institute for American Irish Studies at Pace University.

WHAT: An unusual choice for the first event of an American-Irish institution, Crouch, who is black, will discuss how Americans of Irish descent influenced black culture and were influenced by it. His examples of “Americana” will range from the Irish American director John Ford’s classic vision of the American West to German American Fred Astaire’s “Bojangles of Harlem” performance in the musical Swingtime to minstrel shows.

WHEN: Tuesday, October 11, 2005, 3 – 5 p.m., Multipurpose Room, One Pace Plaza, (across the street from City Hall)

Media admission is by press card.

The event will also include remarks by Tim O’Connor, Consul General of Ireland and a performance by noted American Irish tenor Michael Londra (Riverdance, The Passion Symphony).

Columnist, novelist, essayist, critic and television commentator, Crouch is a co-founder of Jazz at Lincoln Center. In 1993, he received both the Jean Stein Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters and a MacArthur Foundation grant. He is now working on a biography of Charlie Parker.

Expanding on its 100 year commitment to its Latin motto of Opportunitas, Pace University established the Institute for American Irish Studies in May 2005. Christopher Cahill, the long-time editor in chief of The Recorder, the journal of the American Irish Historical Society, is the Institute’s Executive Director. By highlighting the rich history, complex integration and diverse cultural exchanges of the Irish in America, the University intends the Institute to be a first step in creating a broader move towards migration and immigration studies. The Institute’s advisory board includes such American Irish luminaries as authors Edward Conlon and Thomas Kelly, actress Karen Duffy, lawyer and community leader Brian O’Dwyer, and others drawn from the worlds of finance, government, labor, academia, and the arts.