“Aftershock: Rethinking the Future Since September 11, 2001”

Five years after the terrorist attacks of 9/11, Pace University, four blocks from Ground Zero, will host a major conference to examine how those tragic events changed the world in which we live.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contacts:
Chris Cory, Pace University, 212-346-1117 / 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu
Frank Lentini, M. Booth and Associates, 212-481-7000 ext. 601

Note: photos are available on request of objects from the related exhibition of 9/11 artifacts, including a battered 1” x 3” plaque saying “78.” It denoted the sky lobby floor in the south tower, which took a direct impact while many people waited for their elevators.

PACE UNIVERSITY TO HOST
“AFTERSHOCK: RETHINKING THE FUTURE
SINCE SEPTEMBER 11, 2001”

CONFERENCE TO EXAMINE
“THE DAY THAT CHANGED
EVERYTHING”

Speakers include Former White House Adviser David Gergen,
Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin,
9/11 commission co-chair Lee Hamilton, Editor William Kristol.
Event is Part of Pace University Centennial Celebration

NEW YORK, N.Y., July 24, 2006 – Five years after the terrorist attacks of 9/11, Pace University, four blocks from Ground Zero, will host a major conference to examine how those tragic events changed the world in which we live.

Taking place Wednesday through Friday, Sept. 6-8, at the University’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts on Spruce Street, just East of City Hall in New York City, the conference is likely to be the most wide-ranging anniversary forum on the effects of 9/11. Many of the high-level participants have not spoken publicly about 9/11 before.

The conference is titled “Aftershock: Rethinking the Future Since September 11, 2001.”
Admission is free but registration is required. More information is at www.pace.edu/aftershock.

Officials and scholars. The nearly 40 speakers include the vice chair of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks upon the United States, Lee Hamilton, a former Congressman who now is president and director of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; David Gergen, White House adviser to Presidents Nixon, Ford, Reagan and Clinton and editor-at-large of US News & World Report, who will deliver the opening address; Doris Kearns Goodwin, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author and Presidential historian; and Bill Kristol, editor of The Weekly Standard, who will give the closing speech.

Their views will be juxtaposed with the practical experience of many of the key public officials involved in rebuilding and protecting the city’s downtown, including John Cahill, Secretary to Governor George Pataki and his downtown reconstruction coordinator; Stefan Pryor, President of the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, and Congressman Jerrold Nadler. US Senator Charles E. Schumer, State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, and New York City Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly have been invited.

Topics: From Emotions to Economy. “This conference is about preparing for America’s future,” said Pace University President David A. Caputo, a political scientist who also is a conference participant. “We expect to help prioritize the steps that our nation, state, and city need to take to complete our emotional and political reaction to the aftershocks of 9/11. We hope for both contention and consensus on issues from port security and pandemics to local and national politics and foreign policy to reduce the threat of attacks.”

Nine panels will probe everything from the emotional impact on individuals to the economic effects on the global economy. One session examines how 9/11 has changed the preparedness of first responders; another looks at the environmental impact of the attacks; a third examines victims’ families and their influence on public policy.

Exhibitions. Accompanying the discussions will be an exhibition of artifacts from 9/11, many not seen since they went into storage after the attacks. Organized by the New York State Museum, “The First 24 Hours” will include a U.S. flag rescued from the rubble, a section of the chain link fence on Broadway hung with dried flowers and notes seeking missing persons, a firefighter’s air tank, and a seat belt from one of the hijacked airplanes. Also on display will be an evocative art installation recreating a World Trade Center office abandoned by a fleeing worker. The work was created a year ago as the senior project of a Pace undergraduate fine art major, Dan Daley. Both exhibitions will be open to the public at times posted on the website.

Pace students will participate in separate seminars with Gergen, Kristol, Godwin and Hamilton. At the public sessions, a bloc of seats will be reserved for students attending Pace High School, the new “small” public school on which Pace collaborates with the New York City Department of Education.

Education, Slavery, Environment. The conference is part of Pace’s Centennial celebration, which includes three other nationally-significant conferences — a Founders Day Symposium on higher education in a global society (Sept. 27-28); a conference on the Legacies of Slavery and Sisterhood: The Life and Work of Harriet Jacobs (Oct. 6-7) and a worldwide legal summit on Implementing Environmental Legislation (Oct. 16-20).

The Centennial also includes a yearlong volunteer initiative called “100 Opportunities for Service and Civic Engagement” and “Roll Back the Clock Day,” during which Pace cafeterias will offer representative 1906 food items at 1906 prices.

Pace frequently serves as a forum for major addresses by international figures. Starting July 25, Pace will be the location of a series of debates and town meetings involving candidates for New York State offices in this fall’s elections, presented by NY1. Former President Bill Clinton began the Centennial with a speech at Pace in March, a year after Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-NY) hosted a town hall meeting on social security there. Millions of Americans tuned in to the 2003 Democratic Presidential candidates’ debate held at Pace and broadcast on MSNBC.

A private university in the New York metropolitan area, Pace has a growing national reputation for offering students opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement, international perspectives and measurable outcomes. It is one of the 10 founders of Project Pericles, developing education that encourages lifelong participation in democratic processes. Pace has campuses in downtown and midtown New York City and in Pleasantville, Briarcliff, and White Plains, New York (a graduate center and law school). The University enrolls approximately 14,000 students in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu.

Downtown Art from Pace Program Finds Uptown Home at Rockefeller Location

Last summer, the Chilean-born artist Carolina Bermudez, a Queens resident, supervised a group of 8-12-year-old children in the Summer Arts program at Pace University’s downtown campus. The Rockefeller Brothers Foundation bought the children’s post 9/11 mural.

Contact
Tamra Plotnick, Director of Noncredit Adult and Continuing Education Programs
212-346-1692, cell 917.655.7577, tplotnick@pace.edu
or Christopher T. Cory, Executive Director of Public Information, Pace University
212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

ADVISORY
Editors: This could make a photo with caption, or a fuller story on how art helps kids and their future teachers make good.

ART BY DOWNTOWN KIDS WITH HISPANIC MENTORS
FINDS VERY UPTOWN LOCATION

WHEN: Monday, July 11
11:30 AM -12:30 PM

WHERE: Rockefeller Brothers Foundation, 427 Madison Avenue, 37th floor. Ask for Miriam Aòeses (212.812.4224).

WHAT: Last summer, the Chilean-born artist Carolina Bermudez, a Queens resident, supervised a group of 8-12-year-old children in the Summer Arts program at Pace University’s downtown campus. The students made a 5×10-foot mural showing post 9-11 New York City in bright colors. Bermudez was helped by Omar Granillo, a student in Pace’s school of education who lives in the Bronx and holds an educational fellowship funded by the Rockefeller Brothers Foundation designed to encourage minority students to enter teaching. When the course ended he carefully folded the work, put it in his backpack, and carried it to an institute in Washington, DC for Rockefeller fellows. There, foundation representatives decided to have it professionally framed, at a cost that turned out to be nearly $4,000. It now covers much of the wall in the foundation’s conference room in midtown.

On Monday one of last summer’s student artists, Willa Rubin, a 12-year-old resident of Manhattan’s Battery Park City who is a returning student in this summer’s Pace arts program, plus Bermudez, Granillo and professor Patricia Brock, Granillo’s mentor at the Pace ed school, will visit the foundation for lunch and their first glimpse of their displayed masterpiece.

Media are welcome to cover.

Latest Pace Poll on Downtown Rebuilding Shows Health Worries, Skepticism on Terror Alerts

Unresolved doubts about the long-term health effects of 9/11 trouble Lower Manhattan residents. Nearly 6 in 10 (59%) believe the events of September 11 created a long-term health risk for themselves and their neighbors, and a majority (52%) is not reassured by government studies addressing the issue, according to the latest survey by The Pace Poll, a center for survey research at Pace University.

Contact: Martha Cid 212-481-7000

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

To view the complete survey research report, please visit: http://www.pace.edu/PacePoll

PUBLIC FEARFUL OF LONG-TERM HEALTH EFFECTS FROM 9/11,
PACE POLL FINDS

Downtown residents are skeptical of terror alerts

NEW YORK, NY, October 1, 2004 – Unresolved doubts about the long-term health effects of 9/11 trouble Lower Manhattan residents. Nearly 6 in 10 (59%) believe the events of September 11 created a long-term health risk for themselves and their neighbors, and a majority (52%) is not reassured by government studies addressing the issue, according to the latest survey by The Pace Poll, a center for survey research at Pace University.

This is the third survey in The Pace Poll’s Lower Manhattan Rebuilding Tracking Study, which will be fielded every six months through the remainder of the redevelopment effort.

Environmental cleanup:

Public confidence in the environmental cleanup has waned. In August 2003, the Pace Poll found that 61% of downtown residents said the cleanup and monitoring of air quality in Lower Manhattan was going well. In February 2004, less than half (48%) said the cleanup had gone well. Today, only 39% say it went well. “Declining confidence in the environmental cleanup around Ground Zero suggests that, in the public’s mind, many questions are still unanswered,” said Jonathan Trichter, Director of the Pace Poll.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA):

In addition, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) preliminary statements on the air quality at Ground Zero, which were later shown to be unsubstantiated,
appear to have affected the Agency’s credibility. Just 26% of residents trust the EPA to tell the truth about air quality in Lower Manhattan “just about always” or “most of the time.” In contrast, a majority (54%) thinks the EPA tells the truth “only some of the time,” while 16% say the EPA “never” tells the truth.

Terror alerts:

Downtown residents suspect the Administration’s terror warnings are politically calculated. Almost half (46%) of Lower Manhattan residents “strongly believes” and another 17% “somewhat believes” that the Federal government’s color-coded terror warnings are issued for political purposes and not in response to genuine threats.

Issues:

When asked without prompting to name their top-of-mind concern, the plurality of downtown residents (22%) identifies “affordable housing,” 8% say “business returning;” 7% cite “economic development,” and 5% name “finances.” September 11th-specific concerns, like the WTC site memorial (4%), receive fewer mentions. “The traditional social problems of downtown living are restoring the pre-9/11 issue landscape, as resilient residents move on with their day-to-day lives,” said Trichter.

Projects:

Downtown residents dislike the proposal to bury part of West Street in order to eliminate the highway that isolates Battery Park City from the rest of Manhattan – 36% support the plan against 54% who oppose it. The development of the Far West Side is also unpopular among Lower Manhattan residents (35% support it, 60% oppose it).

As for the proposed rail link connecting downtown Manhattan to Long Island and Kennedy Airport, two-thirds (66%) of Lower Manhattan residents support the project in general while 24% oppose it. Yet, for residents who assess the project after learning that “President Bush recently supported Governor Pataki’s request to use two billion dollars of tax incentives for businesses to build [the] direct rail link connecting Lower Manhattan to Kennedy Airport and Long Island,” 50% oppose the project while 45% support it.

* * * *
The Pace Poll is an independent initiative backed by the resources of Pace University, a leader in a range of academic and professional programs. The Pace Poll conducted the survey in conjunction with the University’s Center for Downtown New York (CDNY). By routinely measuring regional and national public opinion on both long-standing and timely topics of civic life, The Pace Poll helps public opinion play a more visible role in the open discussion of current affairs. Jonathan Trichter, the Director of the Pace Poll, is in charge of its survey research, management and analysis.
# #
The results are based on telephone interviews conducted between August 12 and August 31, 2004, among 539 Lower Manhattan residents (living below 14th Street) 18 years of age or older. The sample consisted of phone numbers selected via random digit dial from among exchanges that ensured regions were represented in proportion to their population. The results of the tracking survey are statistically significant within a ± 4% margin of error at a 95% level of confidence. Error margins increase for cross-tabulations and split sample questions.

Vexing Issue of Police-Fire-Ems Emergency Coordination to be Explored at Summit Oct. 14

From the recent report of the national 9/11 commission to the McKinsey and Co. examination of New York City’s response, the 9/11 disaster has spotlighted the importance of police, fire and EMS coordination for homeland security and emergencies — and the difficulties of achieving it.

Contacts
Inspector Daniel Jackson, White Plains Dep’t of Public Safety,
914-422-6350 or djackson@ci.white-plains.ny.us
or
Christopher T. Cory, Director of Public Information, Pace University
212-346-1117, ccory@pace.edu

Note to media: The location of this summit is two blocks’ walk from the White Plains Metro North railway station.

VEXING ISSUE OF PUBLIC SAFETY COORDINATION
FOR HOMELAND SECURITY AND EMERGENCIES
TO BE EXPLORED IN FIRST-EVER POLICE/FIRE/EMS SUMMIT
ON THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14

Organizers hope to encourage national pattern,
already are working with national police and fire organizations

White Plains, NY, October 1, 2004 — From the recent report of the national 9/11 commission to the McKinsey and Co. examination of New York City’s response, the 9/11 disaster has spotlighted the importance of police, fire and EMS coordination for homeland security and emergencies — and the difficulties of achieving it.

Yet promising models of coordination already exist, notably in White Plains, New York, Phoenix, Arizona and Charlotte-Mecklenberg, North Carolina.

To encourage officials to explore these and other models, a first-in-the-nation public safety summit will convene Thursday, October 14, 2004 from 9 am to 5 pm in White Plains at the Pace University graduate center, 1 Martine Avenue.

The co-sponsors are the White Plains Department of Public Safety (which coordinates its police and fire bureaus under a Public Safety Commissioner); two leading national organizations, the Police Executive Research Forum and the International Association of Fire Chiefs; Pace University, through its Edwin G. Michaelian Institute for Public Policy and Management; and the newly formed Foundation for Emergency Preparedness (details below).

Deliberately postponing New York City’s unique issues for a later day, the organizers have invited federal homeland security and domestic preparedness officials, plus high-level police, fire, EMS and private sector executives from mid-sized cities with populations between 50,000 and 250,000 throughout New York, New Jersey and Connecticut.

The conference will discuss presentations by senior public safety officials from Phoenix, Charlotte-Mecklenburg and the White Plains Department of Public Safety.

National experts. Broader context will come from two nationally-recognized experts on emergency preparedness — Arnold Howitt, Ph.D., executive director of the Taubman Center for State & Local Government at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government, and Jerome Hauer, former director of the New York City Mayor’s Office of Emergency Management under Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and now director of the Response to Emergencies and Disasters Institute at George Washington University Medical Center.

“We hope to help leaders in public safety identify collaborative models that police, fire, EMS, municipal governments and the private sector can use to prepare for and respond to critical incidents,” said White Plains Public Safety Commissioner Frank Straub. Straub is the former Deputy Commissioner of Training and an Assistant Commissioner in the New York City Police Department’s Counter Terrorism Bureau. He holds a PhD. in criminal justice and is an adjunct professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City.

“Police, fire and EMS leaders haven’t dropped the ball,” added Brian Nickerson, the lawyer and political scientist who is Director of Pace’s Michaelian Institute – “it’s that few institutional frameworks have been established to help them jointly identify the issues, get feedback from one another and coordinate their efforts into a plan.”

The conference will stress “building blocks” that can lead to opportunities for collaborative emergency preparedness such as routine police-fire problem solving, “Weed-and-Seed” initiatives, safe housing, and joint all-hazards planning.

New foundation created. The conference is an early result of a three-way partnership created this spring between Pace, the White Plains Department of Public Safety and a new foundation, the Foundation for Emergency Preparedness, established with donations from members of the Fenway Charitable Foundation and other private benefactors.

Pace’s Michaelian Institute has been working with municipal governments to address these issues for the last three years. It presented a half-day conference on emergency preparedness in 2002; more recently it worked with Commissioner Straub and the new foundation to conduct a focus group of emergency responders to highlight issues in need of further attention.

“We hope these models, and variations of them, will set a pattern for and help to facilitate improved public safety coordination all across the country,” said Straub.

Date: Thursday, October 14, 2004
Time: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Location: Pace University Westchester Graduate Center
1 Martine Avenue, White Plains, New York 10601
Title: “Building Sound Homeland Security Foundations: Effective Models
for Mid-sized U.S. Cities”

Pace Poll on Memorial Shows Satisfaction with Process, Preferences for Two Designs

A Pace Poll exit survey conducted via paper ballot among people as they viewed the World Trade Center Site memorial competition finalists has found significant satisfaction with the selection process up to now, along with strong support for two particular designs, “Votives in Suspension” and “Suspending Memory.”

Contacts:
Richard Small, M. Booth &Associates, 212-481-7000 x 560
Diane Fusilli, M.Booth & Associates, 212-481-7000 x 605
Christopher T. Cory, Director of Public Information, Pace University
212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

For IMMEDIATE RELEASE
NOTE: Full analysis and topline results are at http://www.pace.edu/pacepoll

PACE POLL ON 9/11 MEMORIAL
FINDS SATISFACTION WITH PROCESS TO DATE,
PREFERENCE FOR “VOTIVES IN SUSPENSION,” “SUSPENDING MEMORY”

New York, December 15, 2003 – A Pace Poll exit survey conducted via paper ballot among people as they viewed the World Trade Center Site memorial competition finalists has found significant satisfaction with the selection process up to now, along with strong support for two particular designs, “Votives in Suspension” and “Suspending Memory.”

The results were released by Jonathan Trichter, Director of the Pace Poll.

The Pace Poll conducted the study in cooperation with the Pace University Center for Downtown New York (CDNY) as part of CDNY’s mission to serve Lower Manhattan as an academic, research, and civic leadership partner in revitalizing downtown.

“We’ve read a lot saying the process should be scrapped. These findings run contrary to that viewpoint,” said Daniel Slippen, Director of CDNY.

The Pace study surveyed 816 viewers who examined the eight designs in the Winter Garden of the World Financial Center during the four days from last Thursday through Sunday night.

“Unlike many of the earliest visitors to the exhibit, these visitors are less likely to posses a particular expertise. But they also are less likely to have come to the Winter Garden at this late date with a particular agenda,” said Trichter. He added that “by no means” do the demographic characteristics of those polled represent the population at large.

Satisfying process. Almost 62 percent of the Pace Poll respondents say their satisfaction with the selection process to date is either a 5 or a 4 on a five-point scale, with 5 meaning “very satisfied” and 1 meaning “very unsatisfied.” Among those who say they are New York City residents, 47 percent judge the process that highly. Overall, only four percent proclaim themselves “very unsatisfied.”

Almost identical numbers (63 percent, 49 percent of New Yorkers) rank their satisfaction with the designs at the 4 or 5 level.

Support for “Votives.” The Pace Poll survey determined preferences for the eight finalists by three measurements: the percentage of viewers who rated each design a “good choice” (versus “satisfactory” or “not acceptable”); the percentage of viewers who selected each design as their “favorite”; and the percentage of viewers who selected each design as their “second choice.” The last two preferences were then combined as an added assessment of general favorability.

The strongest support is for “Votives in Suspension,” by Norman Lee and Michael Lewis, which rates a “good choice” among 43 percent, the favorite among 18 percent and the second favorite choice among 15 percent.

Next is “Suspending Memory, by Joseph Karadin with Hsin-Yi Wu, a “good choice” for 40 percent, a favorite for 21 percent and a good second choice for 10 percent.

The third most appealing design is “Inversion of Light” by Toshio Sasaki, a “good choice” for 32 percent, a favorite for 10 percent, and a second choice for 12 percent.

Least popular was “Lower Waters,” a good choice for 20 percent, a favorite for only five percent, and a second choice for eight percent.

Encouraging participation. “We think that for our students and for our fellow-citizens, participation in the democratic process is encouraged by good information,” said David A. Caputo, the political scientist who has been President of Pace since 2000. He added: “Pace has hosted key forums on the rebuilding of Downtown New York from the initial discussions of plans for Ground Zero to the most recent workshops of Imagine New York. We’re pleased to add these findings to the public discussion.”

The Pace Poll previously has surveyed attitudes of downtown New Yorkers toward the rebuilding process generally. Pace is a comprehensive, independent university committed to opportunity, teaching and learning, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. It has eight campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school, and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. More than 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. Www.pace.edu.

Congresswoman Nita Lowey to speak at 9/11 monument dedication

Nita Lowey to speak at 9/11 dedication ceremony for the unveiling of the Book of Remembrance Monument to honor the 47 Pace University students and alumni victims of the World Trade Center Tragedy.

Contact: Jennifer Riekert (914) 422-4128 Mary Horgan (914) 923-2798
jriekert@law.pace.edu mhorgan@pace.edu
www.law.pace.edu
ADVISORY
Release: Immediate

CONGRESSWOMAN NITA LOWEY TO OFFER OPENING REMARKS
FOR 9/11 MONUMENT DEDICATION
AT PACE LAW SCHOOL

WHAT: Dedication ceremony for the unveiling of the Book of Remembrance Monument to honor the 47 Pace University students and alumni victims of the World Trade Center Tragedy.

WHEN: September 11, 2003, 1:00 p.m.

WHERE: The Quad, Pace Law School, 78 North Broadway, White Plains, New York.

WHO: Congresswoman Nita Lowey
Pace University President David Caputo
Pace Law School Dean David Cohen
As a member of the Homeland Security Task Force of the Democratic Caucus, Lowey supported passage of the landmark Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act, which will improve community response to bioterrorism.

Locally, Lowey secured $1 million for Westchester County to lead the region in the development of an overall bioterrorism response plan, which will ensure that area counties, hospitals, schools and emergency providers are properly equipped and prepared for action in case of a bioterrorism event.

Founded in 1976, Pace Law School is a New York Law School with a suburban campus in White Plains, N.Y., 20 miles north of New York City. Part of Pace University, the school offers the J.D. program for full-time and part-time day and evening students. Its postgraduate program includes the LL.M. and S.J.D. degrees in Environmental Law and an LL.M. in Comparative Legal Studies. Pace has one of the nation’s top-rated Environmental Law programs and its Clinical Education program also is nationally ranked, offering clinics in domestic violence prosecution, environmental law, securities arbitration, criminal justice and disability rights. www.law.pace.edu

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Pleasantville and White Plains, NY and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport in New Windsor, NY. More than 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu

Have we changed since 9/11? Symposium co-sponsored with 92d St. Y

On Wednesday, September 17, at 7:00 PM, a week after the two-year anniversary of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, the 92nd Street Y and Pace University present 9/11: Have We Changed? The program, a panel discussion among Lower Manhattan councilman Alan Gerson, former Windows on the World chef/director Michael Lomonaco and New York Times columnist Frank Rich, considers how New Yorkers have come to understand the events of 9/11, how the city has “processed” this transformative experience, and how we see the events two years after they occurred.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
TICKETS/RESERVATIONS: 212.415.5500 | www.92Y.org
Media contacts:
92ND STREET Y – ALIX FRIEDMAN
212.415.5453 | afriedman@92Y.org
PACE UNIVERSITY – CHRIS CORY
212.346.1117 | ccory@pace.edu

92nd Street Y and Pace University Present
9/11: HAVE WE CHANGED?

Alan Gerson, Councilman • Michael Lomonaco, Chef/Director, Windows on the World Frank Rich, New York Times • Edward Linenthal, University of Wisconsin, Moderator

Evening Starts with Short Video by Project Rebirth

Wednesday, September 17, 7:00 PM
Schimmel Theatre, One Pace Plaza (Spruce Street b/w Park Row and Gold Street); $5

Also:
WHY AMERICA SLEPT:
THE REASONS BEHIND OUR FAILURE TO PREVENT 9/11
Gerald Posner, Correspondent, Today Show

Wednesday, September 17, 12:00-1:00 PM, 35 West 67th Street; $15

NEW YORK, NY: SEPTEMBER 5, 2003 – On Wednesday, September 17, at 7:00 PM, a week after the two-year anniversary of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, the 92nd Street Y and Pace University present 9/11: Have We Changed? The program, a panel discussion among Lower Manhattan councilman Alan Gerson, former Windows on the World chef/director Michael Lomonaco and New York Times columnist Frank Rich, considers how New Yorkers have come to understand the events of 9/11, how the city has “processed” this transformative experience, and how we see the events two years after they occurred.

The event will take place in an unusual location for the Y – at Pace University’s downtown campus, just five blocks from Ground Zero and across from City Hall.

The discussion will be moderated by Edward Linenthal, a professor of religion and American culture at the University of Wisconsin and an expert and communities’ efforts to sustain memory. He is the author of, among other works, Preserving Memory: The Struggle to Create America’s Holocaust Museum (1994) and The Unfinished Bombing: Oklahoma City in American Memory (2001). At a Pace University conference in fall 2002 entitled Building Memories: The Future of September 11, Professor Linenthal addressed the twin topics of how communities react after terrorist attacks and how communal memory functions and changes over time. At that conference, Professor Linenthal asked how we remember events that undermine our bedrock convictions while simultaneously trying to create meaning from those events.

The evening begins with a brief segment of a time-lapse video. The video is the creation of Project Rebirth, a seven-year initiative to document the reconstruction of Ground Zero. Based at Pace University, Project Rebirth is the product of Los Angeles film executive Jim Whitaker and New York producer David Solomon, who will introduce the video. The footage will ultimately become part of a 20 – 30-minute film to be shown at the cultural center planned for Ground Zero.

Earlier in the day, the 92nd Street Y presents another talk on the topic of 9/11: Why America Slept: The Reasons Behind Our Failure to Prevent 9/11. Today show investigative reporter Gerald Poser considers the issue during a one-hour noontime talk at the Y’s west side location (35 West 67th Street, b/w Columbus and CPW), $15.

The 92ND STREET Y unites culture, education and community service in one multifaceted institution. Founded in 1874 by a group of visionary Jewish leaders, the Y has grown into an organization guided by Jewish principles but serving people of all races and faiths. Its mission is to enrich the lives of the 300,000 people who visit its three facilities each year. People come to the Y to attend performances of classical and popular music, jazz, American standards and modern dance; to hear renowned novelists, poets and playwrights read from their work; to listen to world leaders, public figures and experts in every field discuss timely issues; to explore the richness of Judaism with eminent scholars; and to see thought-provoking foreign and independent films. Adults and children enjoy classes in art, music, dance, writing, wellness and fitness, while parents, families, teenagers, older adults, and young people with special needs participate in programs that help them reach their full potential. Committed to sharing its programs with all New Yorkers regardless of economic circumstance, the 92nd Street Y provides over $1 million in annual financial assistance and an outreach program that brings the arts into the lives of 8,000 economically disadvantaged local schoolchildren. For more information, visit www.92Y.org/content/PRESS_RESOURCES.asp.

PACE UNIVERSITY (www.PACE.edu) is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located near Stewart Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Science, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Liehard School of Nursing and Pace Law School.

World Trade Institute of Pace University Reopens in Downtown New York

Nearly two years after its operations and conference centers were destroyed in the attack on the World Trade Center, the World Trade Institute of Pace University (WTI), a major institute for international trade education, is reopening its doors at new facilities on Pace’s campus in downtown New York.

Contact: Crystal Parmar, 212-346-1188, cparmar@pace.edu or Bill Caldwell, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

WORLD TRADE INSTITUTE OF PACE UNIVERSITY REOPENS
IN DOWNTOWN NEW YORK
WITH NEW FACILITIES, UPDATED PROGRAMS

Destroyed on 9/11, institution plans eventual return to original site

NEW YORK, NY – SEPTEMBER 2, 2003 – Nearly two years after its operations and conference centers were destroyed in the attack on the World Trade Center, the World Trade Institute of Pace University (WTI), a major institute for international trade education, is reopening its doors at new facilities on Pace’s campus in downtown New York.

A reception and ribbon-cutting ceremony will be held at WTI’s new location, 163 William Street, 18th floor, on Thursday, September 4, from 6 to 8 p.m. The 45,000 square foot space is intended to be temporary, since the Institute hopes eventually to move back to its original site.

The space now includes 20 classrooms, breakout rooms, a multipurpose room and administrative offices on five floors. It is nine blocks from Wall Street, across from City Hall, and adjacent to the Broadway/Nassau stop for multiple subway lines.

The facilities were made possible thanks to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) obligating more than $4.1 million — the largest reconstruction grant awarded for temporary space for higher education post 9/11 — to the state of New York to help Pace recover from damages sustained in the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center.

The Institute was originally located in space Pace University rented on the 55th floor of One World Trade Center. Miraculously, all of the staff and participants there on September 11 were evacuated to safety. In the weeks immediately afterward, working from makeshift quarters in midtown Manhattan with borrowed computers and personal telephones, the WTI staff began to rebuild its administrative infrastructure and restructure its disrupted class and program schedule. WTI then relocated temporarily to offices at Pace’s Midtown Center, where the Institute has operated for the past year.

“We welcome back the World Trade Institute to the downtown community,” said Pace University President David A. Caputo. “Pace remains committed to re-establishing the Institute’s headquarters at the World Trade Center site, and to helping the global economy that increasingly is dependent on international trade.”

Under the leadership of Executive Director Donna Sharp, the WTI staff has restructured the Institute’s curriculum, reestablished relationships with its students and the international trade community, and significantly expanded the scope of WTI’s international trade and logistics educational programs.

The new space will let WTI schedule courses at more convenient times than the midtown facility permitted and relieve potential schedule conflicts with other university programs.

“This year marks the World Trade Institute’s 30th year as a leading provider of international trade and commerce education, and promises to be one of our most exciting times in recent years,” said Sharp. “Our updated programs and facilities are designed to provide an improved learning and working environment for our talented students, instructors and staff.”

The Institute offers a broad curriculum of international trade and logistics classes through its School of International Trade and Commerce and its Language Center, as well as seminars on a wide variety of timely topics. It provides an educational forum to promote global commerce in the public, private, and non-profit sectors with a curriculum of international trade and transportation courses that is one of the country’s most comprehensive. Subjects include logistics, finance, trade documentation, regulations, customs law, importing and exporting, internet technology, and marketing. (www.wti.pace.edu)

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. (www.pace.edu)

Distinguished, contentious panel on 9/11, Iraq, empire and democracy June 3

With the Middle East at a pivot point and the world freshly alert to the aftermath of 9/11 terrorism, four of the nation’s most distinguished and contentious commentators on public affairs will assemble next week for a public roundtable on “9/11, Iraq, Empire and Democracy.”

Contact:
Chris Cory, 212-346-1117, ccory@pace.edu or
Bill Caldwell, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu
Office of Public Information, Pace University

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Hitchens, Kristol, Schell, Toensing to discuss
9/11, Iraq, Empire and Democracy
at Pace University NY campus June 3

New York, May 21, 2003 – With the Middle East at a pivot point and the world freshly alert to the aftermath of 9/11 terrorism, four of the nation’s most distinguished and contentious commentators on public affairs will assemble next week for a public roundtable on “9/11, Iraq, Empire and Democracy.”

The free event will take place at Pace University’s downtown Manhattan campus, across from City Hall, Tuesday, June 3 from 4:30 to 6:30pm in the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, Spruce and Gold Streets. Space is limited. Reservations are being taken at kvinciguerra@pace.edu or 212-346-1396.

The participants are Christopher Hitchens, Vanity Fair columnist and author of A Long Short War: The Postponed Liberation of Iraq; Jonathan Schell, Nation columnist and author of The Unconquerable World: Power, Violence and the Will of the People; Saad Ibrahim, human rights activist; and Chris Toensing, editor of Middle East Report.

Their discussion will be moderated by Micah L. Sifry and Christopher Cerf, co-editors of The Iraq War Reader: History, Documents, Opinions, being published this month by Touchstone books. The authors will sign copies of their books at a reception after the discussion.

The event is part of an annual, weeklong Pace University course in public affairs that is attended by students from all over the country. This year’s topic is “Democracy at a Critical Juncture: The Ongoing Implications of 9-11” Its organizers are political science professors Christopher Malone and Gregory B. Julian, and it is part of Pace’s participation in Project Pericles.

Pace is one of the first ten colleges selected to develop Project Pericles, the new national consortium of private colleges and universities that will encourage civic involvement. Pace’s President, David A. Caputo, is one of three college presidents who have been involved in the initiative from its inception, and Pace is the only New York university in the group.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, NY and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart Airport in New Windsor, NY. More than 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu

Pace University receives $4.1 million in federal funds to replace classroom space lost on 9/11

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has obligated more than $4.1 million – the largest reconstruction grant awarded for higher education post 9-11 – to the state of New York to help Pace University recover from damages it sustained in the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center.

Photo editors: Shots of news conference available by email on request.

Pace University receives $4.1 million in federal funds to replace classroom space lost on 9/11

Senators Schumer, Clinton help announce largest reconstruction grant to date for higher education

New York, NY – November 26, 2002 – The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has obligated more than $4.1 million – the largest reconstruction grant awarded for higher education post 9-11 – to the state of New York to help Pace University recover from damages it sustained in the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center.

The $4,156,543 grant reimburses Pace University for improvements and alterations to provide alternate classroom space for the university’s World Trade Institute after its facilities on the 55th floor of One World Trade Center were destroyed.

The grant was announced at a news conference at Pace’s downtown campus, three blocks from Ground Zero, at which both U.S. Senators participated, on November 22.

Senator Hillary Clinton praised the leadership of Pace and other institutions in encouraging FEMA to recognize the importance of higher education, which she said did not “neatly fit into any of the pre-existing categories.”

Bounce back. Said Senator Charles Schumer: “If this is a metaphor for New York, it says we live with our losses and never forget them but bounce back and don’t let the bad guys win.”

David A. Caputo, president of Pace University, thanked “FEMA and all those who worked so diligently to secure these funds,” including “the congressional, city and state leadership and the leadership at FEMA and SEMO [the New York State Emergency Management Office, or SEMO], so we can restore our educational facilities to what they were before the 9-11 tragedy.”

Added FEMA Director Joe M. Allbaugh: “This grant helps Pace University’s students resume their normal everyday activities with as little interruption as possible. Non-profit institutions such as Pace are an integral part of the New York community and the federal government remains committed to helping New Yorkers recover from the tragedy of Sept. 11.”

“This funding allows a vital segment of our downtown community to continue their educational studies in a safe, secure environment,” said SEMO director Edward F. Jacoby, Jr.

Pace’s World Trade Institute offers a broad curriculum of international trade and logistics classes through its School of International Trade and Commerce and its Language Center, as well as seminars on a wide variety of timely trade and logistics-related topics, providing an educational forum to promote global commerce in the public, private, and non-profit sectors.

The grant is funded through the FEMA / State of New York Public Assistance program. President Bush authorized FEMA to pay for 100 percent of the program costs following his disaster declaration after the Sept. 11 tragedy. Public Assistance reimburses government agencies and certain non-profits for eligible disaster-related damages and costs not covered by insurance. Among the categories eligible for reimbursement are
debris removal, emergency protective measures and the repair or restoration of damaged public facilities.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart International Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School.