The Caledonian-Record: “The Path To Normalcy”

A young teacher is murdered by a couple pretending to need help. Her 2-year-old child is left in the car unharmed. Amy Ash Nixon, a reporter from the local St. Johnsbury, Vt newspaper, The Caledonian-Record, turns to Pace’s Dr. Richard Shadick to ask how their community can recover from a horrifying violent crime like this.

The abduction, assault and murder of Melissa Jenkins – a popular teacher at St. Johnsbury Academy – has left the community searching for answers, reports The Caledonian-Record in the article, “The Path To Normalcy.”

Many people have been in both shock and disbelief, a feeling that things like this aren’t supposed to happen here.

Dr. Richard Shadick, director of the counseling center and an adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University in New York City, offered his insight into the tragedy that has rocked St. Johnsbury and neighboring towns this week in an interview with Reporter/Columnist Amy Ash Nixon.

“How to help the community heal is the question. It really helps for the local government to have a clear plan in mind about the situation or the traumatic event that occurred. We saw a great example of that with 9/11 in New York City with the mayor providing information that was clear and accurate,” said Dr. Shadick. “People tend to heal faster from traumatic events when they know what is going on.”

“Information about trauma should be disseminated to the community. It’s a horrific situation, but that doesn’t mean that everyone is going to submit to a post-traumatic stress disorder, or get depressed or anxious,” he said Friday afternoon. “Most people are resilient when it comes to circumstances like this. So to get information out about the fact that people are resilient and they can take certain steps to heal from this trauma and not become incapacitated by it,” said Dr. Shadick.

On hearing the signs of community support, about the pink balloons and ribbons tied everywhere, Dr. Shadick said, “that can be very healing.”

“Providing information about what is the process for healing is helpful, too. And to provide guidance when healing isn’t going right,” he said. “If someone is having great difficulty eating or sleeping for weeks and weeks on end, if they are feeling depressed or suicidal, these are all signs that help from a mental health professional is indicated.”

“There are different groups of people that may need different things. Children may need to have a different type of intervention, if you will, than adults, and people who knew the victim may need more support, and an opportunity to grieve differently than the rest of the community,” said Dr. Shadick. “Memorials are helpful. Scholarship funds, those kinds of things, fundraising for the family and many people respond very positively to taking an active role in helping the victims, and that can be very healing.

WCAX-TV “The 9/11 Generation”

A look at the terrorists’ attacks on New York, Washington, D.C., and Shanksville, PA, through the memories of young Lubin sophomore Jarid Raftery, who was 10 years old at the time.

September in Vermont is traditionally filled with stories of leaves changing colors and kids heading back to school. But on a bright September morning 10 years ago, the story for many young Vermonters was one of sadness, uncertainty and fear.

Eighty miles north in Richmond, then-10-year-old Jarid Raftery learned of the attacks when he found his mom in tears.

“My mom was sitting on the couch watching TV crying,” Jarid recalled to a reporter from his Burlington, Vermont, hometown TV station, WCAX. “And I was with my sister and her two friends and we were basically asking her, what’s wrong, what’s going on?”

For a little boy used to playing in the park behind his home in a setting fit for postcards, the attacks were scary, too.

“Especially here in Vermont, we all feel really safe, it’s a great environment, it’s a great place to grow up. So to see that happen even somewhere like 6 hours away, it was just scary for us, definitely scary,” Jarid said.

Jarid memories of the attacks on New York, Washington, D.C. and Shanksville, Pa., are like so many others who watched the horrors through young eyes.

The Rafterys stayed glued to the TV.

“We went and sat down and watched it with her and were just watching this catastrophe happen,” Jarid said.

Jarid’s mom, Ayeshah Raftery, was a flight attendant at the time. She’s from New York City and couldn’t keep the tragedy from her kids.

“A lot of parents were deciding whether to tell their children what was going on, but I needed to tell them what was going on because we had family there,” she explained.

The Rafterys were spared– their family was OK. But a decade later Jarid still thinks of the thousands who died that morning.

“It was almost hard to believe that two of the tallest buildings that I have ever seen in my life don’t exist anymore and that all of those offices and people who worked there, were there every day and essentially spent their lives there are now dead or very injured or escaped by the skin of their neck, basically,” Raftery said.

Stories and images from 9/11 did not stop Jarid from leaving Vermont and heading to college in the city home to the largest terrorist attack the United States has ever seen.

“It looks unreal and you go there today and this is not what you see,” Jarid said.

Jarid is a sophomore at Pace University, a short distance from where the twin towers went down.

“I walk by it all the time and I always just see the gates and every time I look at that area, it just brings back instantly that memory,” he said.

He was at ground zero last spring when Osama Bin Laden, the man behind the Sept. 11 attacks was killed by U.S. forces.

“It was one of the most incredible experiences I have ever been through in my entire life,” Jarid said.

An experience that continues to shape the 20-year-old’s 9/11 story.

“This one man stood up on the gates of ground zero that said, I’m Muslim, don’t panic and led everyone in the crowd in singing the pledge of allegiance, saying the pledge of allegiance and singing that national anthem,” Jarid said.

Ten years later as the bright September skies return, Jarid knows the 9/11 memories he shares with other young people will not fade.

“It clicks for everyone, something inside of them definitely changes and shifts and it is something that as Americans we can all relate to and definitely bond over,” he said.

DailyFinance – “Then and Now: How the Economy Has Changed Since 9/11”

Think back to the evening of Sept. 10, 2001: It’s been 10 years, and in some ways, it’s as if nothing has changed. That Monday night, the United States was coming off a recession stemming from a bursting bubble, consumer confidence was declining, and predatory lending was in the headlines.

But as we all know, everything did change the next morning, in ways that we are still working to understand.

Over the last decade, consumer confidence and housing prices have gone through a dramatic rise and fall, and two massively expensive wars in Iraq and Afghanistan were initiated. 

AOL’s DailyFinance asked economists including Lubin’s Niso Abuaf, to share their thoughts on two questions: What were the most significant economic shifts between 2001 and 2011; and if that decade had a headline, what would it be. 

The Great Disappointment in Real Wage Growth and European Integration

Niso Abuaf, professor of finance, Pace University

“Technology [the innovation of the ’90s] bore fruit and the productivity gains we have experienced in technology, media and telecom sectors have been tremendous with the iPhone, iPad, Blackberry and virtual workplace. But has that accrued to the typical U.S. worker or European worker?  Unfortunately, those productivity gains have not translated into real wage gains and it has been a disappointment. Wages have not kept up with productivity gains. Another disappointment is that Europe’s lack of political union and its response to crisis in [the PIIGS nations] has not been as decisive and quick a response as the U.S. response during the Great Contraction.”

CNBC: September 11: Ten Years Later — Special Report — Are Americans Safer?

Professor Darren Hayes comments in a CNBC story on safety and security in America since 9/11.

Professor Darren Hayes comments in a CNBC story on safety and security in America since 9/11.

From the article:

“We created a whole government department, Homeland Security, but regrettably, we are probably not safer,” said Darren Hayes, a professor at Pace University and an expert in computer forensics and security. “There is still much work to be done.”

Read the full article:

September 11: Ten Years Later — Special Report — Are Americans Safer? – CNBC.

MEDIA ADVISORY: NYC Press Center for Journalists Covering 10th Anniversary of Terrorist Attacks Announced by Pace and National September 11 Memorial & Museum at the World Trade Center

Pace’s Multipurpose Room will be transformed into a newsroom for reporters worldwide covering the 10th anniversary of 9/11.

WHEN: Saturday, September 10, 10am – 8pm; Sunday, September 11, 7am – 7pm

WHERE: Pace University (east of City Hall; blocks from the World Trade Center site).  Use Pace’s Spruce Street courtyard side entrance for Multipurpose Room.  Directions to Pace’s NY Campus

WHAT: High-speed wireless Internet access, workspace, pool broadcast on large-screen monitors, full-service cafeteria, snack shop and peer camaraderie. 

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS: Space granted on a first-come, first-served basis to those showing a New York City press badge or media organization credentials.

PLEASE NOTE:

  • We cannot help with parking. Call 212-NEW-YORK (639-9675) for more information, or visit www.nyc.gov/apps/311.
  • Pace’s Internet portal is robust and highly reliable, but due to construction in the neighborhood, we cannot absolutely 100% guarantee uninterrupted service.
  • To plan your trip to the 9/11 Memorial, use the online reservation system at www.911memorial.org

9/11 ON CAMPUS:  Highlights include: “Witness to Tragedy and Recovery”: Comprehensive exhibition of photos of the terrorist attack and subsequent recovery, a collaboration between Pace and the National Press Photographers Association; student candlelight memorial vigil on Sunday night (time TBD); interviews with Pace faculty experts on 9/11 topics

9/11 MEMORIAL MEDIA CONTACTS: Michael Frazier: office 212-312-8800; cell 347-415-0219; mfrazier@911memorial.org;  Sarah Lippman: office 212-312-8800, cell 646-703-4503, slippman@911memorial.org

PACE MEDIA CONTACTS: Christopher T. Cory: office: 212-346-1117; cell 917-608-8164; ccory@pace.edu;  Samuella Becker: office: 212-346-1637, cell 917-279-5419; sbecker2@pace.edu

National Press Photographers Association (NPPA): “Living In The Echo Of 9/11”

Donald Winslow of News Photographer magazine writes an article, which is featured on the National Press Photographers (NPPA) website, that announces the upcoming collaboration between Pace University and the NPPA. Pace and the NPPA will be sponsoring a symposium and photography exhibit this Fall to mark the anniversary of 9/11. The event is free.

From the article:

“To mark the anniversary of 9/11, NPPA and Pace University are sponsoring a special event, a “visual journalism night of remembrance” that is a both a symposium with speakers and a reception for a photography exhibit. “Witness To Tragedy And Recovery” is a free event (but registration is required). It will explore the impact of media images of the 9/11 World Trade Center attack and recovery. The September 8, 2011, program begins at 5:30 p.m. EDT at Pace University and has been planned to welcome the hundreds of journalists from across the world who will converge on New York City for the anniversary.”

Read the full article and learn more about this event at NPPA.org.

Reuters – “New York finally sees progress at Ground Zero site” – Dr. Richard Shadick

As the ninth anniversary of 9/11 approaches this Saturday, Dr. Shadick reflects on the anger and anxiety over the proposed mosque near the site of the former Twin Towers and the need for a physical memorial in a sacred where people can honor their losses. The Reuters article has been picked up by hundreds of websites worldwide including FoxBusiness.com, ABCNews.com and Yahoo.com.

As the ninth anniversary of 9/11 approaches this Saturday, Dr. Shadick reflects on the anger and anxiety over the proposed mosque near the site of the former Twin Towers and the need for a physical memorial in a sacred where people can honor their losses.  The Reuters article has been picked up by hundreds of websites worldwide including FoxBusiness.com, ABCNews.com and Yahoo.com.

“Some of the anxiety and anger over the plan for a mosque near Ground Zero is fueled by the lack of completion of the 9/11 memorial, and to some extent the fact that (al Qaeda leader Osama) bin Laden is still at large,” said Richard Shadick, director of counseling and professor of psychology at New York’s Pace University.

“A physical memorial in a sacred place where people can honor their losses, I believe, would help quell the pain experienced right now,” Shadick said.

Read the complete text online at http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSN0812292520100909

Pace University Offers Afghanistan and Iraq Veterans 50 Percent Tuition Scholarship

Starting this fall, Pace University will offer a 50 percent tuition scholarship to U.S. military veterans who have served in Afghanistan and/or Iraq from 2001 to the present.

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY OFFERS AFGHANISTAN AND IRAQ
VETERANS 50 PERCENT TUITION SCHOLARSHIP

Uniquely applies to almost all undergraduate and graduate programs, in traditional classroom settings and online

Recognizes “sacrifice and commitment to our country,”
says Pace President Stephen J. Friedman

New York, NY – May 12, 2008 – Starting this fall, Pace University will offer a 50 percent tuition scholarship to U.S. military veterans who have served in Afghanistan and/or Iraq from 2001 to the present.

While other private schools offer scholarships to veterans, as far as Pace knows its program is unique because it applies to virtually all undergraduate and graduate degree programs, university-wide, offered both in traditional classrooms and online, and full and part-time.

(The only exceptions are law, doctoral, and EMBA degrees, which make up about seven percent of the nearly 3900 degrees Pace awards each year. In those programs, Afghanistan and Iraq veterans will receive special consideration; the law school has funding that includes both endowed and need based grants for those who meet the criteria.)

“We are proud to support the education of veterans, and welcome them.” said Pace President Stephen J. Friedman. “They often are sought after by employers who recruit graduates of our diverse professional programs. This new scholarship offer recognizes their sacrifice and commitment to our country, and makes their education more affordable.”

Requirements. Announced today, the scholarship begins this fall for the University’s campuses in New York City and Westchester County. It covers Pace’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

It is open to all veterans who meet Pace’s admissions requirements, and includes veterans now at Pace. Veterans must provide a copy of their DD-214 form with one of the following designations:

Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal (before 2005)
Operation Afghanistan Campaign Medal (2005-present)
Operation Iraqi Freedom Medal

In addition to the 50 percent tuition scholarship, admitted veterans are eligible to receive need-based financial aid from Pace as well as the benefits offered by the GI Bill, provided that all tuition-specific aid does not exceed tuition and the total aid package does not exceed the cost of attendance. In addition, Pace is waiving application fees for these veterans. The scholarship is renewable based on academic performance.

Applicants are encouraged to apply by early summer, but admissions counselors will continue working with applicants through the beginning of the fall semester.

Veterans can get full details and apply for the Pace scholarship by filing an application for graduate or undergraduate admission available on the University’s website at www.pace.edu/veterans. Interested veterans may learn more about the Free Application for Federal Student Aid by visiting www.fafsa.ed.gov.

Undergraduate tuition at Pace for the 2008-2009 academic year is $30,632 for full-time study. Tuition for part-time undergraduate study is $879 per credit. Graduate tuition varies by school and ranges from $763 to $925 per credit.

For 101 years Pace University has offered an unusual combination of professional and liberal arts education, combined with the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling more than 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

9/11 Events at Pace on 9/11

Pace University holds “The First 24 Hours” Remembrance Vigil” on the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

Contact: Sammie Becker, 212-346-1637, 917-734-5172, sbecker2@pace.edu

9/11 events on 9/11
at Pace University Downtown Campus

“The First 24 Hours” REMEMBRANCE VIGIL

When: Monday, September 11 from 8:46 a.m. to 8:46 a.m. on Tuesday, September 12
Where: Lobby, the Pace University Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, 1 Pace Plaza (East of City Hall. Use Spruce Street entrance between Park Row and Gold St.)
Why: Because many people may not want to be alone with their memories on the fifth anniversary, Pace will open its doors for a round-the-clock viewing of “The First 24 Hours,” an exhibition organized by the New York State Museum, of artifacts recovered from the World Trade Center disaster site.
Cost: Free

CANDLELIGHT WALK/SILENT VIGIL
5th annual memorial candlelight vigil (candles provided)
When: Monday, September 11, 9:00 pm
Where: Pace University, 1 Pace Plaza
What: After a moment of silence, Pace University students, staff and faculty members and members of the public, are given candles and walk down Nassau St. and across to the World Trade Center site, passing the Federal Reserve Bank where others will join them.
Cost Free

Pace is the closest university to Ground Zero (three blocks away) and suffered the loss of 47 students and alumni on 9/11.
These events follow a three-day public conference last week, “Aftershock: Rethinking the Future Since September 11, 2001” that presented panel discussions and preeminent speakers including New York City Deputy Mayor Daniel Doctoroff, Presidential Advisor David Gergen, Co-chair of the National 9/11 Commission Lee Hamilton, Presidential Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, and “Weekly Standard” Editor William Kristol.

Subways: 2, 3 to Park Place/Broadway or Broadway/Nassau/Fulton; A, C, J, M, Z to Broadway/Nassau/Fulton; 4, 5, 6 to Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall, J, N or R to City Hall/Broadway.

Major conference, multiple 9/11 activities set for Pace downtown campus

Pace University is holding a collection of 9/11 activities from September 6-12 this year.

Calendar Listing

Contacts:
Chris Cory, Pace University, 212-346-1117 / 917-608-8164
Frank Lentini, M. Booth and Associates, 212-481-7000 ext. 601

9/11 Activities at Pace University, New York Campus
September 6 – 12, 2006
All Events are FREE
Pace is located THREE blocks from the World Trade Center disaster site, at 1 Pace Plaza (across from City Hall)

9/11 Three-Day CONFERENCE: “Aftershock: Rethinking the Future since September 11, 2001” will examine issues ranging from the emotional impact on individuals to the economic effects on the global economy. Featuring Former White House Adviser David Gergen, Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, 9/11 Commission Co-chair Lee Hamilton, Editor William Kristol and many others. Free admission, full program available at www.pace.edu/aftershock.
When: Wednesday, September 6 – Friday, September 8, 2006, beginning at 9 AM
Where: The Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University, One Pace Plaza (use Spruce Street entrance)
URL: www.pace.edu/aftershock
Cost: Free, Pre-registration requested at website
Contact: Mark J. Schepp, 212/346-1020, mschepp@pace.edu
Subways: 2, 3 to Park Place/Broadway or Broadway/Nassau/Fulton; A, C, J, M, Z to Broadway/Nassau/Fulton; 4, 5, 6 to Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall, J, N or R to City Hall/Broadway.

9/11 EXHIBITION Event: Pace University will host “The First 24 Hours,” a traveling exhibition, organized by the New York State Museum, of artifacts recovered from the World Trade Center disaster site. Many of the objects have not been seen since they went into storage after the attacks.
Items Recovered: U.S. flag rescued from the rubble, a section of the chain link fence on Broadway hung with dried flowers and notes seeking missing persons, a firefighter’s air tank, a seat belt from one of the hijacked airplanes, and a battered 1” x 3” plaque saying “78” (which denoted the Sky Lobby floor in the south tower which took a direct impact while many people waited for their elevators).
When: September 6 – Sunday, September 10 from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. It will be open for a 24-hour, round-the-clock remembrance on Monday, September 11 from 8:46 a.m. to 8:46 a.m. on Tuesday, September 12.
Where: The Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts Lobby at Pace University, 1 Pace Plaza (use Spruce Street entrance)
URL: www.pace.edu/aftershock
Contact: Mark J. Schepp, 212/346-1020, mschepp@pace.edu
Cost: Free
Subways: 2, 3 to Park Place/Broadway or Broadway/Nassau/Fulton; A, C, J, M, Z to Broadway/Nassau/Fulton; 4, 5, 6 to Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall, J, N or R to City Hall/Broadway.

The First 24 Hours REMEMBRANCE VIGIL Event: Because many people may not want to be alone with their memories of family, friends, neighbors and business/school colleagues on the fifth anniversary, Pace will open its doors for a round-the-clock viewing of “The First 24 Hours,” an exhibition, organized by the New York State Museum, of artifacts recovered from the World Trade Center disaster site. Pace is the closest university to Ground Zero (three blocks away) and suffered the loss of 47 students and alumni on 9/11.
When: Monday, September 11 from 8:46 a.m. to 8:46 a.m. on Tuesday, September 12
Where: The Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts Lobby at Pace University, 1 Pace Plaza (use Spruce Street entrance)
URL: www.pace.edu/aftershock
Contact: Mark J. Schepp, 212/346-1020, mschepp@pace.edu
Cost: Free
Subways: 2, 3 to Park Place/Broadway or Broadway/Nassau/Fulton; A, C, J, M, Z to Broadway/Nassau/Fulton; 4, 5, 6 to Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall, J, N or R to City Hall/Broadway.

9/11 Memorial Candlelight Walk / Silent Vigil: This year is the 5th annual candlelight vigil, headed by the Civic Traditions Committee from the Office of Housing and Residential Life, will begin at the main entrance at 1 Pace Plaza. After a moment of silence, participants, including Pace University Students, proceed to walk towards the World Trade Center Site.
When: Sunday, September 10, 9:00pm
Where: Pace University, 1 Pace Plaza
URL: www.pace.edu/aftershock
Contact: Mark J. Schepp, 212/346-1020, mschepp@pace.edu
Cost: Free
Subways: 2, 3 to Park Place/Broadway or Broadway/Nassau/Fulton; A, C, J, M, Z to Broadway/Nassau/Fulton; 4, 5, 6 to Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall, J, N or R to City Hall/Broadway.

9/11 CRAIN’S BREAKFAST at Pace University Event: Deputy Mayor Daniel Doctoroff will discuss downtown’s progress five year’s after the September 11th terrorist attacks, as well as the city’s overall economic recovery
When: Wednesday, September 6. Networking Breakfast: 8:00-8:30 a.m; Program: 8:30-9:30 a.m.
Where: The Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University, One Pace Plaza (use Spruce Street entrance)
URL: http://www.newyorkbusiness.com/calendar.cms
Cost: Free. Those wishing to attend must register at the above website.
Subways: 2, 3 to Park Place/Broadway or Broadway/Nassau/Fulton; A, C, J, M, Z to Broadway/Nassau/Fulton; 4, 5, 6 to Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall, J, N or R to City Hall/Broadway.