Broadway World: Tony Winner John Doyle Named Pace Performing Arts’ Musical Theater Artist-in-Residence

Broadway World published an article on Pace Musical Theater artist-in-residence John Doyle.

Broadway World published an article on Pace Musical Theater artist-in-residence John Doyle.

From Broadway World:

Scottish director John Doyle is Pace Performing Arts Musical Theater Program’s second artist-in-residence. The unique Artist in Residence program within the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences is made possible through an anonymous endowed gift.

Doyle, whose inventive re-staging of Sweeney Todd earned him a Tony Award, will work with faculty members at Pace Performing Arts Musical Theater program throughout this academic year to teach a variety of master classes and critique student projects, including vocal performance, song interpretation, the process of composition and the creative process. Doyle will give a public lecture in spring 2014, in which he will explore the creative process of directing musical theater.

To read the full article, click here.

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NEWS RELEASE: Sister St. John Delany presented with proclamation by Mayor Tom Roach declaring “Sister St. John Delany Day” in White Plains

White Plains Mayor Tom Roach declared October 24, 2013 to be “Sister St. John Delany Day” at a ceremony at the Center for Literacy Enrichment located on the Pace Law School campus yesterday.

Lifelong educator Sister St. John Delany presented with proclamation by White Plains Mayor Tom Roach declaring October 24, 2013 “Sister St. John Delany Day” in the City of White Plains

WHITE PLAINS, October 25 – White Plains Mayor Tom Roach declared October 24, 2013 to be “Sister St. John Delany Day” at a ceremony at the Center for Literacy Enrichment located on the Pace Law School campus yesterday.  Mayor Roach presented Sister St. John Delany, PhD, Founder and Director of the Center for Literacy Enrichment with an official proclamation to mark this special occasion. The room was filled with Sister’s friends and supporters from the Westchester community, including Interim Superintendent of White Plains schools Timothy Connors and fellow educators and administration officials from Pace University.

In a heart-felt speech Mayor Roach spoke about Sister’s dedication to teaching and her contributions to literacy in Westchester and the countless students she has taught through the years. “Sister Delaney is a remarkable person who has been teaching and caring for others for most of her life.  You can see the affection that the young people who work with her have for her and it is heart-warming and inspiring to watch. That’s the kind of thing you can’t quantify.”

“Sister St. John absolutely exemplifies the values of the Pace University School of Education,” says Dean Andrea (Penny) Spencer, Dean of the School of Education. “As a teacher, she is a tireless advocate who ensures that all students have the skills and opportunities to grow into excited and life-long learners. She further serves as a beloved instructor and mentor to pre-service educators, inspiring them to create caring classroom communities where learning is a joy not a task.”

Sister St. John taught first grade in White Plains from 1941 to 1972 before founding the Center for Literacy Enrichment and becoming an Associate Professor in the School of Education at Pace University. Sister’s former students include U.S. Poet Laureate (2004-2006) Billy Collins, football great Bob Hyland and Pat Casey, editor of the White Plains Examiner. Sister will also be honored on December 6 at a lunch at the Marriot in Tarrytown as a Senior Hall of Fame Honoree for her significant contributions to enhance educational opportunities and achievement for Westchester County children.

Years before commercial tutoring centers became the norm, Pace University’s Center for Literacy Enrichment was established offered affordable literacy instruction to students of all ages. This year, the Center is proudly celebrating its 41st anniversary with its founder and Director, Sister St. John Delany who is 90 years young. “We encourage students in their efforts with their studies,” said Sister at the ceremony. “We tell the students, ‘You can do it. You can do better’ … and they do.”

About the Center for Literacy Enrichment

The Center for Literacy Enrichment, part of the School of Education at Pace, is housed on Pace University’s Law School campus in White Plains. The Center is staffed by trained literacy tutors, many of whom are enrolled in the Masters in Literacy Program at Pace. The Center serves a broad range of students from diverse socio-economic and cultural backgrounds. Instruction to improve reading skills is provided in small groups or private sessions to K-12 students – both U.S. and foreign-born. The Center takes a skills-based approach with an emphasis on literature.

About Pace University

Since 1906 Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

Daily Voice, Hudson News, Street Insider and others; PLV Breaks Ground On Master Plan

PLEASANTVILLE, NY – Pace University’s Pleasantville campus is celebrating it’s 50th anniversary along with breaking ground on its Master Plan.

“As we commemorate the 50th anniversary of our Pleasantville campus this year, we now prepare for the next half century with a major transformation of our campus,”said Pace President Stephen Friedman.

The breaking ground ceremony took place on October 23rd and has been covered by multiple news outlets, to read more click any listed below:

Harvard Business Review (webinar): “After an Attack: Protecting Your Data, Your Customer and Your Reputation”

Darren Hayes, a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, was the speaker for a Harvard Business Review webinar on cyberattacks.

Darren Hayes, a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, was the speaker for a Harvard Business Review webinar on cyberattacks.

View the presentation.

E-Commerce Times: “SEC Opens the Door to Crowdfunding”

. . . Even with the SEC’s cautious approach, however, crowdfunding’s appeal will likely translate into, at the very least, dashed hopes on the part of both investors and businesses, Bruce Bachenheimer, a professor of management at Pace University, told the E-Commerce Times.

. . . Even with the SEC’s cautious approach, however, crowdfunding’s appeal will likely translate into, at the very least, dashed hopes on the part of both investors and businesses, Bruce Bachenheimer, a professor of management at Pace University, told the E-Commerce Times.

“While there are many exciting possibilities that could come from the act, I’m afraid it will result in an amateur ‘field of dreams,'” he said — “early startups dreaming of easy funding and nascent individual investors dreaming of big returns.”

Crain’s New York Business: New Yorkers test-drive telehealth.

. . .”We want to increase the quality of care, expand health care access and reduce health care costs,” said Chris Gaur, a Pace graduate, speaking at a panel discussion on innovations in telehealth hosted on October 17th at Pace’s Westchester campus.

Earlier this year, a telehealth startup called Vital Care Services was selected with partner Pace University as winners of PILOT Health Tech NYC, an initiative launched by the city of New York and the New York City Economic Development Corp.

Read the full story on Crain’s New York Business

Journal News: Westchester exec race: Astorino, Bramson tangle for last time (video)

. . . “What’s important is not just cutting taxes and cutting programs but having a plan to better the county,” said Sam Fandrich, a graduate student at Pace University and a panelist for the debate hosted by the League of Women Voters of Westchester and Pace.

. . . “What’s important is not just cutting taxes and cutting programs but having a plan to better the county,” said Sam Fandrich, a graduate student at Pace University and a panelist for the debate hosted by the League of Women Voters of Westchester and Pace.

Watch the video of the debate on LoHud.com

 

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University Celebrates the 50th Anniversary of its Pleasantville Campus and Breaks Ground on Major Transformation Project

State, county and local leaders today joined with Pace University administrators to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Pleasantville campus and break ground on the first phase of a Master Plan to transform and revitalize the 200-acre campus. (Left: Pace administrators and students break ground on the second largest construction project in Westchester apart from the Tappan Zee Bridge.)

Pace University Celebrates the 50th Anniversary of its Pleasantville Campus and Breaks Ground on Major Transformation Project

Pace President Stephen J. Friedman is joined by State, County and Local Leaders for this milestone event

PLEASANTVILLE, NY (October 23, 2013) – State, county and local leaders today joined with Pace University administrators to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Pleasantville campus and break ground on the first phase of a Master Plan to transform and revitalize the 200-acre campus.

“As we commemorate the 50th anniversary of our Pleasantville campus this year, we now prepare for the next half century with a major transformation of our campus. This project, together with new academic programs and related enhancements, represents a significant investment in and commitment to the future of the Pleasantville campus,” said Pace President Stephen J. Friedman.

Today’s formal groundbreaking ceremony, which was attended by more than 100 government and business leaders and members of the academic community, represents the culmination of more than four years of extensive planning resulting in a Master Plan designed to enhance the quality of the Pleasantville campus experience. The $100 million project is one of the largest construction projects under way in the Hudson Valley region. The planned improvements are anticipated to be completed over a period of five to eight years.

“Today, we break ground on a project that will make Pace even better, not just in terms of modern ‘green’ buildings, but in terms of what it will offer its future students. Apart from the Tappan Zee Bridge project, this is the largest construction project going on in our county today,” said Westchester County Executive Robert P. Astorino.

“These are truly exciting times for Pace University and the Town of Mount Pleasant. As Pace University celebrates the 50th anniversary of its Pleasantville campus and begins construction on its extraordinary Master Plan, we are reminded of how fortunate we are to have Pace in our community. For over 50 years the University has been exceptionally committed to giving back to our Town through an array of annual community service initiatives, charitable activities and serving as an open campus to our residents. Pace is a tremendous academic, economic and cultural resource to our Town, and the start of its Master Plan marks the University’s reinvestment in the Mount Pleasant community for the next 50 years and beyond,” said Mount Pleasant Town Supervisor Joan Maybury.

The project will enable Pace University to consolidate functions that are now split between campuses in Pleasantville and Briarcliff. Currently 690 students reside on the Pleasantville campus and 590 at Briarcliff. The 35-acre Briarcliff campus, which Pace opened in 1977, is for sale. While no classes are taught in Briarcliff, the plan will allow athletic and certain administration functions that are now there to be brought to Pleasantville.

The first phase of the project (Phase1A) will entail creation of two new residential buildings, an expanded student center, the relocation of the environmental center and athletic facilities necessary to replace those being vacated at the Briarcliff campus. Improvements to the infrastructure, more open green space and improving pedestrian accessibility are also part of the planned enhancements

“This Master Plan is a vision for a modern and sustainable campus designed to improve the student experience,” said William J. McGrath, Senior Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer at Pace. “It will enable Pace to continue to attract and retain high quality students and to fulfill our educational mission. The plan, which is the result of extensive study and analysis, adheres to sustainable development standards in a manner that is sensitive to the existing environmental conditions of the site and the surrounding community.”

The planned improvements will have minimal visible impact on the surrounding area and the 115-acre internal wooded buffer that wraps around the north, east and southeast portions of the campus will remain undisturbed.

The Master Plan represents a significant investment by Pace University in the local and regional economy. As Westchester’s 13th largest employer, Pace contributes approximately $64 million annually to the county’s economy in direct and indirect spending. Of its total workforce, 934 live and work in Westchester; of that total 205 reside in the Town of Mount Pleasant. Additionally, some 18,384 Pace alumni live in the county with 1,900 residing in Mount Pleasant.

About Pace University

Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, N.Y., enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

CNBC.com: “The de Blasio effect: The mayor-apparent and Wall Street”

. . . Farrokh Hormozi, a Pace University economist with the public administration department, said, “I don’t think the market will react or people will leave because of a 2 percent tax hike. The dynamism of New York City is worth far more than that.” (left: Bill de Blasio)

. . . Farrokh Hormozi, a Pace University economist with the public administration department, said, “I don’t think the market will react or people will leave because of a 2 percent tax hike. The dynamism of New York City is worth far more than that.”

Read the story on CNBC.com.

FCPA Blog: “The next big thing — PR meets compliance”

. . . according to Professor John James at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, “Those of us in compliance suspected that audit, legal and risk needed to be at the table during discussions. But we finally understand that the HR and PR teams need to be there as well, getting the word out to the public that the company cares about risk management.”

. . . according to Professor John James at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, “Those of us in compliance suspected that audit, legal and risk needed to be at the table during discussions. But we finally understand that the HR and PR teams need to be there as well, getting the word out to the public that the company cares about risk management.”

“They need to show they are training employees and monitoring their vendors. It’s not just about reporting fines and penalties any longer – or it should not be,” he said.

Read the FCPA Blog.