Pace University and Iona College Co-Sponsor Service-Learning Conference

Pace University and Iona College will co-sponsor “Connecting
Universities and Communities II,” the second of two conferences designed to inform
faculty, students and community agencies about the unique educational opportunities and
social benefits of service-learning courses. The conference, which is free and open to the
public, will be held on Friday, April 11, beginning at 9 a.m. at Iona’s Spellman Hall, 715
North Avenue, New Rochelle.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1268

NEW ROCHELLE, NY — Pace University and Iona College will co-sponsor “Connecting
Universities and Communities II,” the second of two conferences designed to inform
faculty, students and community agencies about the unique educational opportunities and
social benefits of service-learning courses. The conference, which is free and open to the
public, will be held on Friday, April 11, beginning at 9 a.m. at Iona’s Spellman Hall, 715
North Avenue, New Rochelle.

This year’s conference will explore the development of partnerships between universities
and social service agencies. Keynote speakers will be John Saltmarsh, Ph.D., associate
professor of history and coordinator of the community service-learning project at
Northeastern University, and Elinor Polansky, M.S.W., chief administrator of the Henry
Street Settlement House located on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. From their unique
perspectives, Saltmarsh and Polansky will speak on the conference topic “Exploring the
Meaning of Partnerships.”

Saltmarsh, a historian with a special interest in the American tradition of community
service work, will describe “The Democratic Promise of Community/University
Partnership,” and will consider how the democratic model of two institutions working
together to improve communities can help shape educational goals and universities to
achieve those goals.

Polansky, a social worker, psychologist and experienced administrator of community-
based service agencies, will address the community-university partnership from the
perspective of the social service agency and the community it serves. Polansky is the
Henry Street director of the VIA PACE/Henry Street Education Empowerment (EEP)
service-learning program.

Developed in fall 1995 and funded by a grant from Learn and Serve America, a branch of
the Corporation for National Service, the EEP is an ongoing, model service-learning
partnership between VIA PACE (Volunteers in Action at Pace University) and the Henry
Street Settlement House. Through EEP, Pace faculty have developed 18 service-learning
courses in which Pace students serve the Henry Street community in a variety of
capacities, including expanding health services to its clients.

The conference will bring together more than 10 schools from New York City,
Westchester and Fairfield Counties. After the keynote address and discussion, conference
participants will break into small groups to discuss pedagogy and curriculum integration,
community partnerships, faculty development and the future of service-learning.

For more information, call the VIA PACE office in Pleasantville, NY, at (914) 773-3539
or contact Professor Suzanne Senay at VIA PACE in New York City at (212) 346-1767.

VIA PACE is a dynamic program of the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences designed to
help students become actively involved in the community and the problems it faces.

Pace, founded in 1906, is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in
New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in
undergraduate and graduate programs in The Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin
School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of
Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.

Pace Law School Hosts Discussion on Cameras in the Courtroom

The Evening Students Association of Pace University School of Law will host a panel discussion on the use of cameras in the courtroom, on Saturday, March 15, beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the Tudor Room, Preston Hall, 78 North Broadway, White Plains, NY. The event is free and open to the public.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1268
WHITE PLAINS, NY — The Evening Students Association of Pace University School of Law will host a panel discussion on the use of cameras in the courtroom, on Saturday, March 15, beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the Tudor Room, Preston Hall, 78 North Broadway, White Plains, NY. The event is free and open to the public.

Courtroom Television Anchor Raymond Brown, Pace University School of Law Professor Jay Carlisle, who sits on the New York State Governor’s Commission on Cameras in the Courtroom, and County Court Judge Kenneth Lange, who is president of the County Court Judges Association of the State of New York, will discuss the various aspects of this controversial topic with Kevin Doyle, capital defender at the New York State Capital Defender’s Office, Jack Litman, of Litman, Asche & Gioiella in New York City and other leading experts.

Governor George Pataki appointed Carlislie and Pace trustee Henry Miller to the New York State Committee to Review Audio and Visual Coverage of Court Proceedings in New York. The New York State Legislature has asked the committee to evaluate the state’s ten year experiment with cameras in the courts and issue a report to the legislature by May 1, 1997. The legislature will decide whether the legislation authorizing cameras should be permanent.

The School of Law is part of a comprehensive, independent and diversified University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Its Environmental Law program is ranked third in the country by U.S. News and World Report. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.

For more information, please call (914) 422-4292.

Pace University Appoints New Director of Athletics

Pace University has announced the appointment of Joseph F. O’Donnell as director of athletics and recreation.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
PLEASANTVILLE, NY — Pace University has announced the appointment of
Joseph F. O’Donnell as director of athletics and recreation.

O’Donnell served for eight years as director of athletics at American University in
Washington, D.C., responsible for the management and operation of a Division I athletics
program and an extensive intramural and recreational program. During his tenure, he
oversaw the construction of a $21-million facility that provides
a state-of-the-art venue for intercollegiate athletics, recreational and instructional
programs, convocations, graduations and other campus gatherings.

In announcing O’Donnell’s appointment, Philomena Mantella, vice president for
enrollment management and student life, said “He brings to Pace an extraordinary, broad-
based background with hands-on experience directing initiatives that form the centerpiece
of our athletics and recreational priorities over the next five years.”

O’Donnell was an assistant athletics director at Wichita State University in
Kansas. He served for 12 years as an assistant and associate athletics director at LaSalle
University in Philadelphia, and prior to that as a recr eation coordinator for the City of
Philadelphia. He also was a high school teacher and coach in the Catholic Diocese of
Philadelphia.

O’Donnell received a bachelor’s degree in economics from LaSalle University and
a master’s degree in educatio n with a concentration in athletics administration from
Temple University in Philadelphia.

Pace University’s varsity athletics program is recognized as a leader in the
National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II in the northeast. The
University has 15 varsity sports teams and is a member of the NCAA, the Eastern
Collegiate Athletic Conference, and beginning in Fall 1997, the Northeast-10 Conference.
All Pace University sports teams, with the exception of the NCAA Divis ion I baseball
team, compete in the NCAA Division II.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City
and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and
graduate degree programs in t he Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of
Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education,
School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.

Southwestern Wins Moot Court Competition at Pace

The three-person team from Southwestern University School of Law won the Pace University School of Law Ninth Annual National Environmental Moot Court Competition with the highest combined score for both the oral argument and written brief. More than 80 law schools nationwide participated in the three-day event, which is the largest moot situated all under one roof, and the largest environmental moot court competition in the nation.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1268

WHITE PLAINS, NY — The three-person team from Southwestern University School of
Law won the Pace University School of Law Ninth Annual National Environmental
Moot Court Competition with the highest combined score for both the oral argument and
written brief. More than 80 law schools nationwide participated in the three-day event,
which is the largest moot situated all under one roof, and the largest environmental moot
court competition in the nation.

Becky Clark, Adrienne Miller and Joan Spaeder from the Southwestern University School
of Law team had the highest score for their oral presentation as they represented the
While-U-Wait Photo Service in the final round. The case involved retroactive Comprehensive
Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) applicability and medical
monitoring cost recovery to track toxic photo chemicals which were released into the ground
water. The Southwestern team beat out the two teams from the University of Memphis and
Northwestern School of Law of Lewis and Clark College.

Other schools took awards in the following categories: Best Oralist, Minjoo Lee from
Washington University School of Law (St. Louis); Best Overall Brief, University of
Texas School of Law; and Best Brief Representing Each Party, University of Baltimore
School of Law and University of Houston School of Law.

This year’s specific case, selected by the White Plains, NY-based school’s Moot Court
Board, was given to each of the teams prior to the competition, and each two- or three-
person team prepared and submitted a written brief defending one position regarding the
topic of retroactivity and commerce clause issues in a CERCLA proceeding. In past
competitions, students have argued on environmental topics ranging from illegal
dumping to personal liability for violation by a corporation.

Each team argued from three points of view — the government/regulator, the regulated
industry and the citizen public interest group. Each team defended all three positions
before a panel of judges comprised of attorneys and federal and state judges, most of
whom are specialists in the field of environmental law. The competition consisted of
three rounds, and each team was rated on their written brief and each oral defense.

The judges presiding over the final round included: Environmental Appeals Judge
Honorable Edward E. Reich, who works with the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency’s Environmental Appeals Board; Honorable Eugene E. Siler Jr., a United States
Court of Appeals Judge for the Sixth Circuit in Cincinnati, Ohio; Honorable Jane R.
Roth, a United States Court of Appeals Judge for the Third Circuit in Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania; and Honorable Richard D. Cudahy, a United States Court of Appeals
Judge for the Seventh Circuit in Chicago, Illinois.

Preliminary rounds were held on Thursday, February 20, and Friday, February 21 with
the top-scoring 27 teams advancing to the quarter-final round. Only nine teams advanced
to the final rounds, held on Saturday, February 22. All of the participating schools,
volunteers and judges participated in a special reception on Friday, February 21, hosted
by Texaco Inc.

The Southwestern University team received a traveling trophy of an original watercolor,
“Dawn-Storm King,” by Hudson Valley artist John Husley, that commemorates the 1965
court decision inaugurating the field of environmental law. Last year’s winning team was
from The University of Houston. Winning briefs will be published in the Pace
Environmental Law Review.

The School of Law is part of a comprehensive, independent and diversified University
with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Its Environmental Law
program is ranked third in the country by U.S. News and World Report. Nearly 14,000
students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson
College of Arts, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information
Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.

Prominent Trial Lawyer Bill Wagner to Discuss Attorney Ethics at Pace

Prominent trial lawyer Bill Wagner, a past president of the Association of Trial Lawyers of America (ATLA), and nationally known expert in tort litigation, will be the guest lecturer for the 1997 Philip B. Blank Memorial Lecture on Attorney Ethics at Pace University School of Law. The lecture, titled “Legal Ethics in a Confrontational Society,” is free and open to the public, and will be held on Thursday, April 3, at 5 p.m. on the School of Law’s campus at 78 North Broadway, White Plains, in the Moot Court Room of the Gerber Glass building.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1268
WHITE PLAINS, NY — Prominent trial lawyer Bill Wagner, a past
president of the Association of Trial Lawyers of America (ATLA), and
nationally known expert in tort litigation, will be the guest
lecturer for the 1997 Philip B. Blank Memorial Lecture on Attorney
Ethics at Pace University School of Law. The lecture, titled “Legal
Ethics in a Confrontational Society,” is free and open to the
public, and will be held on Thursday, April 3, at 5 p.m. on the
School of Law’s campus at 78 North Broadway, White Plains, in the
Moot Court Room of the Gerber Glass building.

Wagner will address the increase of confrontation in society and its
impact on the practice of law, particularly modern civil litigation.

“It could be argued that the behavior of members of the legal
profession may, to a great extent, merely reflect the attitudes of
their clients and of society as a whole,” Wagner said. “It is time
to evaluate these dramatic changes.”

Wagner, a senior partner in the law firm of Wagner, Vaughan &
McLaughlin in Tampa, Florida, is an elected member of the American
Law Institute and a member of its governing Council. He serves as
an advisor to the Restatement (Third) of Torts: Products Liability,
a project promising significant reformulation of the law of Products
Liability.

Wagner’s law firm, Wagner, Vaughan & McLaughlin, is one of the
oldest plaintiffs’ trial firms in the South. He is certified as a
civil trial advocate by the National Board of Trial Advocacy, and is
a board-certified civil trial Lawyer as recognized by the Florida
Bar. Among his numerous professional honors, Wagner is a fellow of
the American College of Trial Lawyers.

The Philip B. Blank Memorial Lecture was established by the family,
friends and colleagues of the late Philip B. Blank, associate dean
for external affairs and professor of law at Pace University School
of Law. In honor of Dean Blank’s commitment to legal ethics, the
Blank Lecture presents distinguished members of the legal community
who are recognized for their leadership in the area of attorney
ethics and practice.

The School of Law is part of a comprehensive, independent and
diversified University with campuses in New York City and
Westchester County. Its Environmental Law program is ranked third in
the country by U.S. News and World Report. Nearly 14,000 students
are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the
Dyson College of Arts, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer
Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law
and Lienhard School of Nursing.

For more information, please call (914) 422-4205.

Pace Students Volunteer in Argentina for Spring Break

A group of students from Pace University will travel to South America during spring break to participate in a service-learning course and to volunteer their time for those in need. The eight undergraduate students will be in Argentina from March 7 through 15, stopping in Buenos Aires, San Miguel de Tucumán and the small village of Tafí del Valle in the Andes Mountains.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK — A group of students from Pace University will travel to South
America during spring break to participate in a service-learning course and to volunteer
their time for those in need. The eight undergraduate students will be in Argentina from
March 7 through 15, stopping in Buenos Aires, San Miguel de Tucumán and the small
village of Tafí del Valle in the Andes Mountains.

This three-credit course, a history elective titled “Service and Study in Argentina,”
examines the political structure, economics and the sociological aspects of this Latin
American country. In addition to the traditional classroom component, the course’s
highlight comes from the travel and service segment consisting of a few days exploring
Buenos Aires, followed by several days in the interior province of Tucumán.

One bilingual speech therapy student will assist at the Colegio de Sordomudos
“Don Bosco,” a high school rehabilitation institute for deaf mutes in San Miguel de
Tucumán; three nursing students will donate their services to provide prenatal nutrition
counseling to expectant mothers in a public medical clinic; and others will be painting
and providing other maintenance at the same clinic in the rural village of Tafí del Valle.

The eight students, along with Daniel Greenberg, professor of history and co-
director for Pace’s Institute of Latin American Service and Studies, will be accompanied
by a full-time translator. In addition to volunteering during the trip, students pay their
own transportation fees and other expenses. Course requirements include a midterm and
research paper.

“Argentina, the world’s eighth largest country, is a land of intriguing diversity,
including the culturally European metropolis of Buenos Aires, as well as those regions
that are culturally Indian and Latin American,” said Professor Greenberg. “Many public
facilities in more rural areas, like Tafí del Valle, are in drastic need of assistance.”

The Institute of Latin American Service and Studies at the Dyson College of Arts
and Sciences at Pace was founded in 1993 by Dr. Greenberg and Dr. Jordan Young. The
Institute’s first major initiative was its Service and Study Trip to Rio De Janeiro, Brazil,
in 1995, where students helped to renovate an elementary school named after Pace.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City
and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and
graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of
Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education,
School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.

Lubin School of Business to Offer New M.B.A. in Health Systems Management

Pace University’s Lubin School of Business will offer a new master’s degree program in business administration with a concentration in health systems management beginning September 1997. The program will prepare students for management positions who are able to combine leadership skills with an understanding of the ethical and policy issues of the complex health care field.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK — Pace University’s Lubin School of Business will offer a new
master’s degree program in business administration with a concentration in health
systems management beginning September 1997. The program will prepare students for
management positions who are able to combine leadership skills with an understanding
of the ethical and policy issues of the complex health care field.

“Out of seventeen million jobs created during the next ten years in the United
States about three million will be in health care,” said Dr. Vasanthakumar Bhat, associate
professor of management science and coordinator of the new program. The demand for
health care managers in New York is roughly 1,500 annually, while schools in the state
currently produce only 500 professionals in the field.

Lubin’s health systems management program combines M.B.A. core courses with
specialization courses in the management, economics and strategic planning of health
care organizations and delivery systems, and the legal, ethical and social policy issues in
health care. The specialization courses will be taught by Pace University faculty from
the Public Administration Department in Dyson College and the Lienhard School of
Nursing. M.B.A. core courses will be taught by faculty in the Lubin School of Business.

The Lubin School of Business, with 5,500 students, offers undergraduate, graduate
and doctoral degree programs, and hosts a number of research centers and institutes
which extend its scholarship and teaching to a worldwide audience. The School is
accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB).

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City
and Westchester County.

Lubin School of Business to Offer New M.B.A. in Health Systems Management

Pace University’s Lubin School of Business will offer a new
master’s degree program in business administration with a concentration in health
systems management beginning September 1997. The program will prepare students for
management positions who are able to combine leadership skills with an understanding
of the ethical and policy issues of the complex health care field.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK — Pace University’s Lubin School of Business will offer a new
master’s degree program in business administration with a concentration in health
systems management beginning September 1997. The program will prepare students for
management positions who are able to combine leadership skills with an understanding
of the ethical and policy issues of the complex health care field.

“Out of seventeen million jobs created during the next ten years in the United
States about three million will be in health care,” said Dr. Vasanthakumar Bhat, associate
professor of management science and coordinator of the new program. The demand for
health care managers in New York is roughly 1,500 annually, while schools in the state
currently produce only 500 professionals in the field.

Lubin’s health systems management program combines M.B.A. core courses with
specialization courses in the management, economics and strategic planning of health
care organizations and delivery systems, and the legal, ethical and social policy issues in
health care. The specialization courses will be taught by Pace University faculty from
the Public Administration Department in Dyson College and the Lienhard School of
Nursing. M.B.A. core courses will be taught by faculty in the Lubin School of Business.

The Lubin School of Business, with 5,500 students, offers undergraduate, graduate
and doctoral degree programs, and hosts a number of research centers and institutes
which extend its scholarship and teaching to a worldwide audience. The School is
accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB).

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City
and Westchester County.

Sportsman’s Series Reels in Country’s Leading Fishing Experts

Six of the country’s top professional anglers will share their expertise at
Pace University this spring, for B.A.S.S.* Fishing Techniques 1997. The
program, part of the University’s Sportsman Series, provides a unique opportunity
to “school” with the pros in a classroom setting.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
PLEASANTVILLE, NY — Do you know how to fish with a “gitzit?” What is the
best way to pause spinner bait? When is the best time of year for trolling?

Six of the country’s top professional anglers will share their expertise at
Pace University this spring, for B.A.S.S.* Fishing Techniques 1997. The
program, part of the University’s Sportsman Series, provides a unique opportunity
to “school” with the pros in a classroom setting.

Pace University’s Environmental Center has been sponsoring the Sportsman Series
for eight years, allowing fishing enthusiasts of all ages and skill levels to
learn about the best techniques for catching trophy fish. From February through
April, the Center offers two and a half hour evening seminars on topics ranging
from salt water and watershed reservoirs fishing, to jigging for bass and rowboat
fishing for trout. There is also a fly-casting clinic to demonstrate basic techniques
and principles of casting and line handling.

“Even though I’ve probably watched every fishing program there is on TV twice, I still
walk out of these seminars with new ideas,” said James Eyring, assistant director of
Pace’s Environmental Center, who has been fishing for 38 years. This program is one
of only a handful of university-based Sportsman’s Series in the country.

For part of the Series, the Center will host B.A.S.S.* Fishing Techniques 1997 on
April 12-13, drawing six of North America’s leading competitors to campus. They will
conduct 12 workshops during the weekend and lead an informal “think tank” session to
share their secret techniques, stories and anecdotes. This year’s instructors are
Kevin VanDam (Michigan), George Cochran (Arkansas), Jay Yelas (Texas), Kenyon Hill
(Oklahoma), Rich Tauber (California), and Mitch Paul (Maine).

For more information about the 1997 Sportsman Series, call (914) 773-3789. Advance
registration is required.

Pace University’s Environmental Center is an affiliate of the department of biological
sciences and specializes in equine science and nature studies. It offers both credit
and non-credit courses and workshops to the University and surrounding communities and
is committed to educating people about the importance of conservation and protecting
the environment.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and
Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate
degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business,
School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law
and Lienhard School of Nursing.

* The Bass Anglers Sportsman Society (B.A.S.S.) was founded more than 25 years ago as a
service organization. Its primary aim is to help anglers get the most out of bass
fishing — whether it’s by protecting the fishing environment, reporting on the newest
products and techniques, telling them about the latest “hot spots,” or providing an arena
for professional and amateur fishing competitions.

Dyson College Offers New Graduate Program in Environmental Science

Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences will offer a new master’s degree program in environmental science beginning this fall. The program, to be taught by faculty in the departments of biological sciences, chemistry and physical sciences, is the only one of its kind in the New York Metropolitan area.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
PLEASANTVILLE, NY — Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences will offer a new master’s degree program in environmental science beginning this fall. The program, to be taught by faculty in the departments of biological sciences, chemistry and physical sciences, is the only one of its kind in the New York Metropolitan area.

Scientific and technological advances of the 19th and 20th centuries have led to substantial economic growth and progress world wide. These changes, however, also have impacted the environment in significant and unexpected ways. “Pace’s interdisciplinary graduate program will help students acquire the knowledge and practical skills needed to tackle the environmental challenges of the 21st century,” said Dr. David Rahni, professor of analytical chemistry and director of the new program.

Students will learn about the growing challenges facing today’s global community, including the depletion of natural resources, disruption in the food chain, global climate changes, the decline of air, water and land quality, and the increase in toxic pollutants. Also, they will learn methods of monitoring, correcting and preventing such environmental problems.

This 39-credit master’s degree program has been approved and registered by the New York State Department of Education. Classes and research will take place in the Dyson Hall of Science, which is a modern facility with environmental instruments, an aquatic ecology laboratory, computers and state-of-the-art technology.

Students may have opportunities to participate in cooperative educational internships for field work experience. Degree candidates will have a broad, in-depth knowledge and appreciation of the field of environmental science as well as practical research skills.

Employment opportunities for graduates may include environmental research, testing, analysis, field assessment, and waste management for nonprofit foundations, corporations, federal and state research centers and universities. There also will be opportunities for management positions in federal, state and local environmental protection agencies and departments and of environmental conservation.

Students interested in applying for admission to the program should have completed the equivalent of two years of basic, undergraduate science courses. However, qualified students can enroll in the program and complete undergraduate prerequisite courses along with the graduate-level courses.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.