NEWS RELEASE: Former Clinton Adviser Tells Colleges to Get Radical and Work Outside the System

In a speech marked by pointed criticism of American environmentalism, James Gustave “Gus” Speth told regional colleges this weekend “It’s time for a new environmentalism” and for “going back to the ideas of the 1960s and early 1970s, rediscovering their more radical roots, and stepping outside the system in order to change it before it is too late.” (Left: Michelle Land and Gus Speth)

Former Clinton Adviser Tells Colleges to Get Radical and Work Outside the System–

Warns Higher Education Consortium of “The Specter of Failure.” Calls for Redesign of Environmental Education

PLEASANTVILLE – In a speech marked by pointed criticism of American environmentalism, James Gustave “Gus” Speth told regional colleges this weekend “It’s time for a new environmentalism” and for “going back to the ideas of the 1960s and early 1970s, rediscovering their more radical roots, and stepping outside the system in order to change it before it is too late.”

Speaking at Pace University, the former adviser to Presidents Clinton and Carter and former Yale University Dean pulled no punches with the Environmental Consortium of Colleges & Universities.

“The environment continues to go downhill, fast,” he told the group. “Bottom line:  a specter is haunting U.S. environmentalists — the specter of failure.”

Now a professor at Vermont Law School, Speth made headlines in 2011 when he was arrested and jailed for three days following an environmental protest at the White House.

Echoing Speth’s theme, Michelle Land, Director of the Pace University Academy for Applied Environmental Studies and Director of the Consortium, told the 124 representatives from colleges and universities, “It is our duty in the decade ahead to use our unique resources to transform our region into a world capital of environmental research, education and knowledge. . . Never have our collective talents and resources been more needed. And never has our duty to the future of the human and natural world been more clear.”

Land stunned the audience with an assessment of the size and impact of the region’s colleges and universities which she said number 130, and teach 870,000 students, employ 93,000 staff and faculty, occupy more than 40,000 acres of land and consume more than 20 billion gallons of water annually.

“Collectively, we are the largest community in the Hudson-Mohawk watershed, and the second largest community in the state of New York,” she said.

Speth was presented with the Environmental Consortium’s Great Work Award, in honor of Father Thomas Berry, former Riverdale resident and environmental author, and delivered his keynote address on Saturday.

Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs at Pace, John Cronin, said, “Professor Speth is calling on us to radicalize or face environmental failure. He sees higher education as an institution that has the talent, knowledge and influence to lead society to success.”

Speth’s message to teachers and students was clear on that point: “We environmentalists can legitimately claim many victories but we are losing the struggle–losing the overall effort to pass our beleaguered planet on to our children and grandchildren. . . My hope is that you can help redesign the university’s approach to environmental studies, and environmental education generally, in a way that embraces the true keys to environmental success.”

About the Conference

Other conference highlights included the opening keynote by David Hales, President, Second Nature, on Friday. Hales spoke about living sustainably in the future climate. He believes that while evidence of climate change mounts, colleges and their communities are not prepared and have not assessed the impacts of climate on their missions, curriculum, infrastructure, operations, students, workforce, investments, and endowments.

“Institutions of higher education have a responsibility to create research-based knowledge aimed at assessing and responding to climate impacts and to prepare themselves and help others prepare,” said Hales.

Plenaries included “Preparing our Campuses for an Uncertain Future” (Fri.) moderated by Andrew Revkin, New York Times Dot Earth blogger and Senior Fellow of Environmental Understanding at Pace; and “The Middlebury Campus as a Learning Laboratory via the Classroom and the Boardroom” (Sat.) moderated by Jack Byrne, Director of Sustainability Integration at Middlebury College.

Revkin pointed out at the end of his panel that it is important to know your audience when framing discussions of climate resilience, because – in the business world particularly — “Not everyone believes climate change is a clear and present danger” but almost everyone agrees that it’s a bad idea to build in harm’s way.

Breakout sessions included discussions of various topics on sustainability in higher education. On Friday afternoon, Professor Ghassan Karam, a Pace University environmental economist, led a spirited discussion of limits to growth in which Liu Mingming, a visiting associate professor of environmental law from Shandong University of Science and Technology, took the stance that developing countries cannot be denied the right to advance their economies. There was wide agreement that the status quo is not sustainable and that universities play a vital role in testing new ideas.

There was also an exhibitor expo and musical performance by Revkin’s Breakneck Ridge Revue.

Environmental Consortium of Colleges & Universities:

The Environmental Consortium of Colleges & Universities was established in 2004 to advance our understanding of the cultural, social, political, economic and natural factors affecting the region, and currently has 60 member institutions. By promoting collaboration among its members, the Consortium works to provide ecosystem-based curricular and co-curricular programming aimed at improving the health of the regional ecosystem. The mission of the Environmental Consortium is to harness higher education’s intellectual and physical resources to advance regional, ecosystem-based environmental research, teaching, and learning with a special emphasis on the greater Hudson-Mohawk River watershed.

Spearheaded and hosted by Pace University, the Consortium’s headquarters is situated within the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies in Pleasantville, New York.  Among Pace Academy’s stated goals is to externally apply the university’s strengths to local and global environmental problems. As a testament to its commitment to interdisciplinary pedagogy, scholarship and service, the Academy provides essential administrative support that grounds the Consortium’s programs.

Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies: Pace Academy is the first of several centers envisioned by Pace University’s President, Stephen J. Friedman, to promote high-level collaborative and interdisciplinary programming in key thematic, academic areas throughout the University. The Academy is a freestanding institute that renews and deepens the University’s long-standing commitment to environmental research, scholarship, and service.

Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies builds on its predecessor, the Pace Academy for the Environment, created in 2002 and known for regional leadership spearheading the formation of the Environmental Consortium of Colleges & Universities and serving as the incubation office for the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries, which concentrates on applied technological innovation.

The current breadth and depth of Pace University’s environmental programming is evidenced by globally recognized undergraduate, graduate, and professional degree programs augmented by related curricular, co-curricular, experiential, and service programs centered on the environment.

Contact: Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu.

 

Journal News (video): “Mean Girl Cattiness: She Was Born With It?”

. . . The findings of the study—that women use relationships to navigate life and get ahead—is nothing new, said Dr. Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, an adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University.

. . . “Indirect aggression”—otherwise known as gossiping, backstabbing and shunning—is a technique women have perfected through the ages, and have employed as an effective competition strategy, claims Tracy Vaillancourt, a professor of psychology at the University of Ottawa, in a report published in the Canadian journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B last month.

“Females prefer to use indirect aggression over direct aggression (i.e. verbal and physical aggression) because this … maximizes the harm inflicted on the victim while minimizing the personal danger involved,” according to the report. “The risk to the perpetrator is lower because he/she often remains anonymous.”

The findings of the study—that women use relationships to navigate life and get ahead—is nothing new, said Dr. Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, an adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University.

“Whenever studies like this come out, we tend to make generalizations, and yes, women use relationships to get ahead,” said Powell-Lunder, a co-author of the book, “Teenage As a Second Language: A Parent’s Guide to Becoming Bilingual. “The survival of the fittest for men is based on physical prowess. Even in the businesses world, men who show they are fierce and strong with their voice and body language are revered. For women, it’s more about learning to negotiate systems through relationships to get where they need to go. And unfortunately, that has its negatives.”

Watch the video on Journal News blog The Hall Monitor.

 

Agence France Presse: “Twitter hits Wall Street with a bang”

. . . “There’s always going to be investor mania, but it doesn’t tell us anything about the future,” said Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University.

. . . “There’s always going to be investor mania, but it doesn’t tell us anything about the future,” said Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University.

“The fundamental question is how much people have to say on Twitter. We know there are some people who are social and want to talk all the time, but you can’t make a business model on those people.”

Chiagouris added that “large corporations with hundreds of millions of dollars have not put substantial sums into paid media with Facebook and Twitter.”

“They all are experimenting but nobody is putting 25 percent in social media. It may not sound cool but traditional media is still the media of choice today,” he said.

Read the story by Agence France Presse.

Read more comments by Prof. Chiagouris in the Guardian (UK).

Washington Post: “Twitter IPO: Buzz builds over risks and (possible) rewards”

. . . Twitter’s ad products show potential, but the company might not be able to turn its platform into an indispensable tool for marketers, said Larry Chiagouris, a marketing professor at Pace University in New York.

. . . Twitter’s ad products show potential, but the company might not be able to turn its platform into an indispensable tool for marketers, said Larry Chiagouris, a marketing professor at Pace University in New York.

As a whole, social media haven’t provided the return on investment that many advertisers want, he said. Twitter’s emphasis on real-time conversation about events such as the Super Bowl or the Academy Awards means even the strongest ads don’t have much lasting value, Chiagouris said.

“Those event-driven tweets are highly limited,” he said. “On the day-to-day kind of things, most people don’t have a lot to say. And most other people don’t care to hear what others are saying.”

Read the article in the Washington Post.

Read more comments by Prof. Chiagouris in San Jose Mercury News.

MacNewsWorld: “Apple to Put Down Roots in Arizona”

. . . The fact that Mesa is a rising education hub likely influenced Apple’s decision, said Joseph Pastore, professor emeritus at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business.

. . . The fact that Mesa is a rising education hub likely influenced Apple’s decision, said Joseph Pastore, professor emeritus at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business.

“Companies like to locate where there is talent,” he told MacNewsWorld. “[Mesa] has been undergoing an interesting initiative to bring higher education to its city. It has attracted five colleges from various points in the U.S. to add branches in Mesa. The fundamentals for plant location in Mesa are emerging in the form of a concentration of an educated workforce.”

Sustain What? Colleges Gather to Question Their Environmental Role

Presidential Adviser Turned Activist to Be Honored by Higher Education Consortium

“Environmental sustainability” may be a catch phrase of the 21st century, but who knows what it really means?  The Environmental Consortium of Colleges & Universities will wrestle with that problem at its tenth annual conference Friday and Saturday. On hand to lend guidance will be James Gustave Speth, former adviser to President Bill Clinton and founder of the World Resources Institute. 72 year-old Speth made headlines in August 2010 when he was arrested at the White House for protesting the Keystone XL Pipeline.

Event: Tenth Annual Conference of the Environmental Consortium of Colleges & Universities.

Date and Time: Friday, November 8, 8:30 AM – 7:00 PM; Saturday, November 9, 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM.

Location: Pace University, Kessel Student Center, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville, NY, entrance 3.

“Our colleges and universities occupy more than 40,000 acres of land in the Hudson-Mohawk watershed, and employ, teach and house more than 1 million people in over 100 different locations,” said Michelle Land, director of both the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies and the Environmental Consortium. “Our job is to make sense of what ‘environmental sustainability’ means to that complex picture.” Land will give welcome remarks at the conference.

David Hales, President of Second Nature, will deliver the opening keynote on Fri., Nov. 8.  Prior to assuming this post, Hales was President of College of the Atlantic, the first U.S. institution of higher education to be a “NetZero” emitter of greenhouse gases.

James Gustave “Gus” Speth, Professor of Law, Vermont Law School will be presented with the Environmental Consortium’s “The Great Work Award, in honor of Thomas Berry” and deliver a keynote on Saturday.

The conference is open to the public. The rate for people affiliated with institutions in the Environmental Consortium is $20 for students ($30 for non-members), $100 for members ($125 for non-members).  Group discounts and single day registrations available ($50 for members, $65 for non-members). The fee includes admission to conference, meals and breaks, Friday reception, dinner and music, exhibitor expo, and poster session. Media admission is by press pass.

NEWS ADVISORY: “Who Ya Gonna Call? — The Uncertain Landscape of Cybersecurity Law and Policy”

Tim Clancy, President of Arch Street LLC, will give an “inside the Beltway” perspective on cybersecurity law and policy issues on Wednesday, November 13 at Pace University’s Lower Manhattan campus, One Pace Plaza, 2nd Floor, Lecture Hall West, noon to 1:20 p.m.

Note: Members of the media must RSVP to attend.  Email wcaldwell@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY

Pace University lecture: “Who Ya Gonna Call? — The Uncertain Landscape of Cybersecurity Law and Policy”

New York, NY — November 6, 2013 — Tim Clancy, President of Arch Street LLC, will give an “inside the Beltway” perspective on cybersecurity law and policy issues on Wednesday, November 13 at Pace University’s Lower Manhattan campus, east of City Hall and six blocks from Wall Street, at One Pace Plaza, 2nd Floor, Lecture Hall West, noon to 1:20 p.m. The event is sponsored by Pace’s Office of Government and Community Relations and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Clancy has broad experience in federal science and technology policy in academia, government and the private sector. He represented the National Science Foundation before Congress, serving in senior positions in the NSF Office of Legislative and Public Affairs. He also served two tours as a professional staff member on the House Science Committee and as Chief of Staff to Representative Sherwood Boehlert in the House of Representatives. He has won federal sponsored research awards as a research faculty member at George Mason University. He has received two awards from the National Science Foundation and the Department of Homeland Security in the fields of cybersecurity law, policy and economics research and has organized and presented at major international conferences on cybersecurity.

Clancy currently conducts research as part of an NSF-funded Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace project in collaboration with the George Mason University Center for the Study of Neuroeconomics led by Dr. Kevin McCabe. Clancy has far-reaching policy expertise having directed major Committee hearings in cybersecurity and academic research and helped shepherd major legislation enacted into law. His legislative and policy accomplishments include the Cybersecurity Research and Development Act of 2002 (P.L. 107-305) as well as Title II and Title III of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (P.L. 107-296).

While on Capitol Hill, Clancy oversaw the establishment of the DHS Science and Technology Directorate and the DHS Cybersecurity Division. He also acted as chief liaison for Congressman Boehlert to the Department of Defense and particularly the United States Air Force Research Laboratory on issues of information technology and cyber security research and development.

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

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Newly Renovated Clinical Education Labs and Simulation Experiences Give Future Nurses an Edge

PLEASANTVILLE, NY – Every  day nurses make countless decisions that impact patient care and ultimately save lives. How do they know they are making the right decision?  They have been taught by experts in the field and have developed crucial skills such as clinical reasoning and critical thinking, and they’ve had hands-on experience.

One way they get that experience is through simulation.

New labs in the College of Health Professions at Pace University allow students to take part in simulations that expose them to a range of scenarios so they know exactly what to do when faced with these situations in real life.  The labs also enable students to practice skills, familiarize themselves with electronic medical records, and prepare medications using computerized systems to reduce the chance of error.

The new Clinical Education Labs are set to be formally unveiled at a grand opening reception scheduled for Friday, November 8.

The labs have the latest generation of human patient simulators (HPS), along with a video capture and playback system that includes camera feeds from the simulation rooms.  Videos are stored and viewed on computers, allowing faculty members to evaluate and debrief students on performance. Students may also review their own performance in scenarios, as self-reflection is a vital component to learning in the simulation environment.  Several of Pace’s clinical partners throughout the region will also use the space to develop and reinforce critical clinical skills required of health care workers.

The new labs include a “control room” so students will be immersed in simulations without faculty members having to be in the same room. This helps students suspend their disbelief and helps them to be fully present in the simulation experience.

“Students are on their own. Without interference of faculty members, the situation becomes more real,” says Professor Elizabeth Berro, RN. She notes that faculty members are still able to cue students with phone calls, patient behaviors (controlled through computerized mannequins), and “standardized patients” (actors playing the role of patients) to meet the overall objectives of the scenario.

The renovations enable multiple acute scenarios to take place simultaneously, so students are exposed to situations where patients need a specific course of action to be taken; these situations may not occur in a hospital every day, but students need to learn about them so they know exactly what to do when they occur.

The improvements allow for an area designated for standardized patients (actors) to get ready for their scenarios.  Keeping them separated from students increases the authenticity of the scenario, aiding in the learning experience.  The actors will be able to watch scenarios unfold on monitors so they know when to join the scene.

The renovations also mean there is ample space for students from all programs to learn and practice basic skills.  There are skills rooms for family nurse practitioner (FNP) students and physician assistant (PA) students to provide physical exams and to be evaluated by their professors.  The labs will be heavily used in the upcoming semester; in fact, according to Marybeth Carpiniello, MPA, RN, Clinical Education Labs manager, there will be more than 500 “events” in the lab this semester, from simulations to skills learning, to tutoring.

Feedback from students has been extremely positive so far. “They look forward to practicing in the labs; they are so excited, and they benefit from the safe environment we create.  A mistake made and learned from in the lab today under the watchful guidance of a faculty member could help save a life tomorrow in a real clinical setting,” says Clinical Instructor Joanne Knoesel, RN.

According to Dean and Professor Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, “Our students get evidence-based learning experiences that are deeply meaningful while at the same time realistic and safe. They develop confidence in their skill set before moving on to the clinical setting.”

Hospitals and other health care organizations seek out students with simulation on their resumes, according to Associate Dean Gerrie Colombraro, PhD, RN, “Our students have a competitive advantage when they graduate because they’ve done simulation. It shows potential employers that they’ve worked in teams to solve problems and that they’ve been exposed to complicated or high risk scenarios.”

About the College of Health Professions: Pace’s College of Health Professions is made up of the Lienhard School of Nursing and the Pace University-Lenox Hill Hospital Physician Assistant Studies program. Students at the College learn evidence-based care, cultural competence and primary health care in an interprofessional setting in programs preparing them to be family nurse practitioners, advanced practice nurses, physician assistants, registered nurses and clinical leaders.

About the CEL: The Clinical Education Labs at Pace’s College of Health Professions create an active interprofessional learning environment which promotes intellectual curiosity and integration of clinical and didactic health care knowledge utilizing current effective technology in full collaboration with Pace University, the College of Health Professions, students, faculty, staff, alumni, and community partners.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high-quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact: Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu, 914-906-9680.

New York Times Music Review: “Jamie Barton Opens Voce at Pace Series”

The superb mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton, quickly becoming known for the flood of sound she can unleash, began her recital on Sunday afternoon singing against type.

The superb mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton, quickly becoming known for the flood of sound she can unleash, began her recital on Sunday afternoon singing against type.

“Music for a While,” written by Purcell and arranged by Britten, starts in stillness, and Ms. Barton quieted her tone into a float. The effects she achieved were subtle ones. “Your pains were eas’d,” the song’s text goes, and Ms. Barton gradually smoothed the repetitions of that final word so that “eas’d,” well, eased.

The flood eventually came — Sibelius’s “Black Roses” was on the program, among other powerhouses — but Ms. Barton’s tranquil moments were among the most memorable on Sunday, hovering even in the arid acoustics of the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University.

Read the New York Times Music Review.

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing Prepares Student for Future Career Challenges

White Plains resident, Jacqueline Alleva, RN often reflects on how she prepared for the challenges of her life-saving work as a nurse on the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) at The Children’s Hospital at Montefiore in the Bronx through her education at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing.

One recent patient often comes to mind when she thinks about how her clinical work as part of her degree program prepared her for her current challenges.

A two-year-old child with heart failure had arrived at the unit after being placed on the Berlin Heart, a mechanical device for babies and children awaiting transplant. “When she first came in, this little girl wouldn’t look at anybody,” Alleva recalls. “She wouldn’t look anybody in the eye; that’s how scared she was. And when you’d walk into her room, she’d say two words — ‘Night night’, which meant ‘Get out’.”

During the time that the child was on the Berlin Heart, Alleva and her colleagues saw her not only regain some of the energy that heart failure had stolen, but open up to the PICU staff as well. “After a while, when I would walk into her room, her whole face would light up,” Alleva says. “She would touch my face, we’d interact, and we’d play. That’s what happens when you get deeply involved. She understood that we were there for her and that we cared, and that built trust.”

Alleva’s story encapsulates the work of cardiac nurses at Montefiore, and the daily challenges that they meet. Their patients, from infants to the elderly, are severely ill and can be at Montefiore for weeks or months at a time. Cardiac nurses have to stay constantly current on the complexities of the devices and transplant protocols that are these patients’ last hope. In both the Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit, for adult patients, and the PICU at Montefiore, nurses take simultaneous responsibility for patients, their family support systems and the machines that are keeping them alive.

Alleva has learned first-hand that nursing is a profession that combines personal and professional intensity, exemplary skill and extraordinary reward. Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing prepared Alleva well for this profession.  She said, “My shift as a PICU nurse always starts the same way, with the pinning of my Pace pin. It’s a bit of an outdated practice I’m sure, but for me, my nursing pin inspires me each shift, reminding me of where I’ve been and why I am here.”

Alleva obtained a liberal arts degree from Pace and later went back to study nursing.  She said, “I learned many things in the nursing program, from pathophysiology to pharmacology, to medical surgical nursing and pediatrics.  All these courses prepared me for my boards, and clinicals gave me a taste for what each specialty in nursing had to offer.”

Alleva determined where she wanted to work after graduation as a result of her preceptorship.  “I was in a PICU and was amazed at how much teamwork was involved,” said Alleva.  “From seeing my first ‘code’ to learning all about vasoactive drugs, I still recall the rush I felt each shift. It’s the same way I feel now when I know I’m going to have a busy shift. I know that I will get through whatever the PICU will throw at me because not only do I have the base of knowledge necessary, but I also have the emotional supports needed for when days are rough.”

Alleva has friends from her nursing program that she relies on for support, as well as her mother, who also happens to be the Associate Dean of the College of Health Professions at Pace and a nurse herself. “I have a wonderful mother who listens to me cry about the bad things and laugh about the inane things I see,” said Alleva. “My husband, although not a medical professional, has gotten more comfortable with my tales of the PICU. And when I go running downstairs screaming, ‘My patient got her heart’, he may not completely ‘get’ all that she went through and what a big accomplishment it is for her and my unit, but he knows to smile and jump up and hug me.”

Alleva is now halfway through her graduate work in the family nurse practitioner program at Pace. “Each day I wear my Pace pin, I am proud of how far I have come and where my journey has led me. I get to save lives every day, and make children smile while I do it. It’s not always sing-a-longs and play dates, but on challenging days, I think about the really great days, like when my patient got her heart and how great post-transplant hugs are, and I rub my pin to gain some strength and keep pushing forward.”