Second Careers, First Loves: Retraining Professionals for Teaching

Pace University School of Education is providing an entry point into the teaching profession for career changers and college graduates who have had no previous formal study in the field of education. Since 1986, the Career Change Master of Science for Teachers (M.S.T.) degree program has enabled approximately 500 people to enter a new, more fulfilling second career.

Contact: Steve Borzoni
(212) 346-1851

NEW YORK-Pace University School of Education is providing an entry point into the teaching profession for career changers and college graduates who have had no previous formal study in the field of education. Since 1986, the Career Change Master of Science for Teachers (M.S.T.) degree program has enabled approximately 500 people to enter a new, more fulfilling second career.

One of those people is Sam Friedman of Yonkers, N.Y., who began attending classes at Pace after retiring as a satellite communications engineer at RCA. After completing the M.S.T. program, he was offered a position at the Graphic Communications Arts High School in New York City where he teaches mathematics. “My relationship with these students has been very gratifying,” says Friedman. “Working to help these kids become better students brings me a much deeper sense of satisfaction than building better satellites.”

With the M.S.T. degree and satisfactory scores on the New York State Teacher Certification Examination, students with baccalaureate degrees in fields other than education become provisionally certified to teach. They become eligible for permanent certification after two years of full-time teaching. The 36-credit program provides both theoretical frameworks and opportunities for their practical application. Students explore the different ways individuals learn, and develop their unique teaching style to meet the needs of individual students.

The average age of an M.S.T. student is about 30, although students have ranged in age from 22 to 62. Many students come to the program with experience in business and finance, science, technology, arts and communications, as well as government, military and medical backgrounds. Most are offered public school positions teaching at the elementary level.

Dr. Carol Keyes, chair of the Teacher Education department, recognizes that “the program is attracting mature professionals, who have had successful careers but now want to teach.”

“Many students find the communications, writing, managerial and organizational skills learned in their previous careers most useful when they are teaching in the classroom,” says Dr. Sandra Flank, professor of education.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.

Pace Celebrates Year of the Rooster

“21st Annual Chinese New Year Extravaganza: Year of the Rooster,” presented by Pace University’s School of Education, along with ARTS, Inc., New York State Council on the Arts and New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

Contact:
Rossella Dipopolo, Pace University School of Education, rdipopolo@pace.edu

Rosemary Mercedes, Pace University, (212) 346-1637, rmercedes@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY– INVITATION TO COVER

PACE HOSTS ANNUAL CHINESE NEW YEAR EXTRAVAGANZA

WHAT: “21st Annual Chinese New Year Extravaganza: Year of the Rooster,” presented by Pace University’s School of Education, along with ARTS, Inc., New York State Council on the Arts and New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

WHO: Students from New York City’s downtown area schools will celebrate the Chinese New Year with colorful performances, including children from PS 124 Yung Ming School and Pace University High School students. Also performing, a group of 30 seniors from Project Open Door Senior Center will present dances to “New York, New York” and “All That Jazz.”

WHEN: Wednesday, February 2, 2005
12 – 2 p.m.

WHERE: Pace University, The Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts Theater (located on Spruce Street between Gold Street and Park Row), One Pace Plaza, New York, NY.

Pace University to Host Community Chinese New Year Extravaganza

Eighty local school children from Chinatown in downtown New York will participate in Pace University’s School of Education’s 18th annual Chinese New Year Extravaganza celebrating the year of the Horse, 4700. More than 400 local school children from Chinatown and Brooklyn will come to watch the celebration. The celebration will take place at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts on Spruce and Gold Streets of the University’s downtown campus on February 6, from 12:00 – 1:30 p.m.

NEW YORK – Eighty local school children from Chinatown in downtown New York will participate in Pace University’s School of Education’s 18th annual Chinese New Year Extravaganza celebrating the year of the Horse, 4700. More than 400 local school children from Chinatown and Brooklyn will come to watch the celebration. The celebration will take place at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts on Spruce and Gold Streets of the University’s downtown campus on February 6, from 12:00 – 1:30 p.m.

To ring in the Year of the Horse children from Chinatown schools JHS 56, PS 2, and IS 131 will perform traditional Chinese dances choreographed by A.R.T.S., Inc. A children’s art exhibition will be also on display at the bookstore at One Pace Plaza, level B, from February 2 to 9 from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. There will be a special showing of the exhibit in the lobby of the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts on February 6.

The event is co-sponsored by JPMorgan Chase, United Chinese Students Association and the Office of Multicultural Affairs in conjunction with A. R. T. S., Inc. and the Chinese American Planning Council.

The Chinese New Year Extravaganza is a community event open to the public; reservations are not required for individuals but school groups should call in advance to ensure space. For access to the art exhibit please call in advance.

For more information call: Jennifer White at 212-346-1118

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Pace University and Putnam/Northern Westchester BOCES Partner to Address Teacher Shortages

Pace University and Putnam/Northern Westchester Board Of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) have created the Come Teach with Us Academy, an alternative certification program that will help local school districts fill teacher positions in the critical shortage areas of secondary science, math and languages other than English.

Pace University and Putnam/Northern Westchester BOCES
Partner to Address Northern Westchester and Putnam Teacher Shortages
in Math, Science and Language Disciplines

Pleasantville, NY – Pace University and Putnam/Northern Westchester Board Of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) have created the Come Teach with Us Academy, an alternative certification program that will help local school districts fill teacher positions in the critical shortage areas of secondary science, math and languages other than English.

All candidates selected for the Come Teach With Us Academy are assured of teaching positions in Putnam or Northern Westchester County schools next fall. The participants accepted into the Academy will complete an intensive teacher-training program this spring and summer. Substantive field experience will be provided prior to placement through substitute teaching, assistant teaching, tutoring and summer school placement. Participants will continue to attend classes in late afternoons, early evenings, weekends and on-line while they are teaching and until they have completed New York State teacher certification requirements. Throughout the program participants will work with mentor teachers from both the school districts and from Pace University’s School of Education.

Courses will be held in the evenings and on weekends, beginning in March, and during
the summer at the Academy campus located in Yorktown on the BOCES campus; distance-based learning will be used for some courses as well. Pace University will provide scholarship assistance resulting in a tuition reduction.

Come Teach With Us Academy participating school districts include: Bedford, Brewster, Briarcliff, Carmel, Chappaqua, Croton-Harmon, Hendrick-Hudson, Katonah-Lewisboro, Lakeland, Mahopac, North Salem, Ossining, Peekskill, Putnam Valley, Somers and Yorktown.

Candidates will be drawn from individuals interested in changing careers, retirees seeking a second career, individuals returning to the employment arena and recent college graduates. All candidates must have a bachelors or higher degree in an area of science, mathematics or language other than English and must have demonstrated academic excellence with a grade point average of 3.0 or better. Participants will be selected through a highly selective interview process.

Interested candidates should contact: Carol Ross, Coordinator, Come Teach With Us Academy, (914) 248-2357 or e-mail: cross@pnwboces.org. or Pace University Graduate Admissions Office, (914) 422-4283, email: gradwp@pace.edu.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Putnam/Northern Westchester BOCES is a regional education agency serving 18 school districts in northern Westchester and Putnam counties in the areas of vocational education, special education, curriculum, guidance and management.

Pace University to Partner in New York City Teaching Fellows Program

Pace University announced today its partnership with the New York City Board of Education as one of several private colleges and universities which will be a part of this year’s New York City Teaching Fellows Program.

Contact: Mary E. Horgan
(914) 923-2798
mhorgan@pace.edu

NEW YORK — Pace University announced today its partnership with the New York City Board of Education as one of several private colleges and universities which will be a part of this year’s New York City Teaching Fellows Program.

“Pace is committed to the City and its children and we are pleased to be part of this important program,” said Pace University President David A. Caputo, who is also the co-chair of the New York State Professional Standards and Practices Board for Teaching. “In order to participate, we will make up the difference between the CUNY tuition for 35 new fellows so that we can help meet the needs of the City’s children for qualified teachers.”

New York City Schools Chancellor Harold Levy launched the Teaching Fellows in 2000 as an effort to fill the many vacancies of the City’s lowest-performing schools with accomplished citizens who want to make a difference. Fellows are chosen through an intensive selection process, are trained in an accelerated pre-service program, and then begin teaching in under-performing schools. They are then required to participate in a fully funded master’s degree program while teaching.

Earlier this year the Board of Education announced that it would invite private colleges and universities to be a part of the accelerated teaching certification program. In its first year the Board worked exclusively with institutions in the City University of New York. The invitation to private higher education is one of several strategies designed to meet Chancellor Levy’s target of 2,000 fellows for this year compared to last year’s program which prepared about 350 teachers.

“We recognize the City’s urgent need for teachers and our responsibility to be involved,” said Jan McDonald, Dean of the Pace School of Education. “At present over 12,000 of the city’s 78,000 teachers are uncertified. Chancellor Levy and the Board of Regents acknowledge the need for certification and recognize the legitimate role that schools of education play in the preparation of teachers. We feel that it is important for us to be active players in defining that role.”

As a part of the commitment of the Board of Education each teaching fellow is provided with an “on-site” mentor from the school district. In addition, programs are required to provide a mentor from participating colleges and universities. “One of the most critical elements for success will be the mentoring of the teacher during the first year,” said David Avdul, who will direct the new Pace Fellows Program. “So, even though it was much more expensive, in our model we doubled the required amount of time that our university mentors would be working with the fellows.”

Colleges or universities planning to create an alternative certification program were required to have their program approved by the State. Pace received word from the New York State Education Department that its application to recommend candidates for the State’s new Transitional Certification had been approved in the middle of February. The Pace Fellow Program is projected to begin in the middle of June.

“It was in the spirit of concern for the children, faith in our ability to develop and implement a strong program, and guarded optimism that we committed ourselves to this program,” said Mary Versteck, one of the Pace faculty who served on the fellows task force. “Our task is to support the teaching profession as a profession, challenge shortsighted solutions and serve as constructive critics from the inside.”

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Pace University’s School of Education to Co-Sponsor 10th Annual New York City History Day, March 12

For the past 10 years, the Museum of the City of New York has proudly sponsored New York City History Day, a regional contest that encourages students to study and learn about historical issues, i deas, people and events. This years’ event, co-sponsored by Pace University’s School of Education, will be held on Sunday, March 12, 2000, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Pace’s campus in lower Manhattan across from City Hall Park.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK – For the past 10 years, the Museum of the City of New York has proudly sponsored New York City History Day, a regional contest that encourages students to study and learn about historical issues, i deas, people and events. This years’ event, co-sponsored by Pace University’s School of Education, will be held on Sunday, March 12, 2000, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Pace’s campus in lower Manhattan across from City Hall Park.

Students from all five bor oughs will take a historic look at how turning points in history have defined the 20th century. Participants will present individual or group projects in four categories: Historical Papers, Exhibits, Documentary Presentations and Performances. A team of three judges evaluates each project, and prizes are awarded to the top three projects in each category. In addition, entrants will also be eligible for special category awards. All participants will receive a Certificate of Participation and books focu sing on NYC history.

New York City History Day is the first step toward competing in National History Day, a contest held in June at the University of Maryland at College Park. Winners from New York City History Day will advance to New York State His tory Day and then on to the national competition.

This year, National History Day has designated the theme “Turning Points in History: People, Ideas and Events.” From the invention of the wheel to the dismantling of the Berlin Wall, the efforts of coun tless people have changed everyone’s daily lives. This topic will offer students a chance to look back and discover how various historical turning points have helped shape the past and how they will continue to play a crucial role in the future.

New Yo rk City History Day is co-sponsored by Pace University’s School of Education, Citigroup, The History Channel, the Gap, the Association of Teachers of Social Studies/United Federation of Teachers and the Sheepshead Bay Historical Society. For further info rmation, please contact Mike Radice, Learning Programs Coordinator, at The Museum of the City of New York, (212) 534-1672 ext. 250.

The Museum of the City of New York is a private, not-for-profit educational agency established in 1923 to collect, preser ve and present original material related to the history of New York City. In addition to individual contributions and gifts from foundations and corporations, the Museum receives public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, the National Endo wment for the Humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts. The City of New York, the owner of the Museum’s building, provides support in the form of operating and programmatic funds through the Department of Cultural Affairs.

Pace University is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Busi ness, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Pace University’s School of Education Receives $220,000 Grant to Train Student-Teachers to Work in Urban Schools

Pace University’s School of Education has been
awarded a three-year, $220,000 grant to create a Professional Development
School (PDS) in the Bronx. Called Project CUE, this collaborative program
will pair Pace faculty with local school teachers to prepare future educators
to work in urban schools.

Posted by Public Affairs on November 04, 1998 at 15:12:56:

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. – Pace University’s School of Education has been
awarded a three-year, $220,000 grant to create a Professional Development
School (PDS) in the Bronx. Called Project CUE, this collaborative program
will pair Pace faculty with local school teachers to prepare future educators
to work in urban schools.

The grant was awarded to the School of Education by the Fund for Improvement
of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE). Part of the U.S. Department of Education
in Washington, D.C., FIPSE awards grants for small, innovative programs in
higher education that serve as models for other U.S. colleges and universities.
This is the fifth FIPSE grant for Pace’s School of Education.

“A serious issue facing education in this country is the preparation of new
teachers for positions in urban schools,” said Rita Silverman, a professor of
education at Pace University. Pace has several successful Professional Development
Schools in Westchester, but this will be its first urban PDS.

“Urban teaching positions are often filled by uncertified teachers while many newly
certified teachers from the suburbs are taking jobs as teaching assistants. Project
CUE students who serve a three-year apprenticeship in District 10 in the Bronx as
part of their undergraduate education should be prepared to work both willingly and
successfully in urban schools,” Silverman said.

Silverman and Pace Professor Carole Rhodes are the co-principal investigators of Project
CUE. Pace Professor Ann Spindel will coordinate the on-site activities.

The grant is designed to prepare Pace students to handle the special challenges of
urban schools. “What better way to do this than to place apprentice teachers at the
same school for three years, supported by mentor teachers?” Silverman said.
Working together, District 10 teachers and Pace faculty will co-teach courses for the
students.

The first year of the project will include planning and identifying District 10 teachers
who will participate in Project CUE. Project staff will collaborate with District 10 teachers
to design the PDS, plan seminars, and prepare Pace students for an urban experience.
During the fall 1999 semester, Pace students will be placed in District 10 and will return
to the same school and teachers for the next three years, as apprentices in Project CUE.

Pace University is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City
and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and
professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business,
School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard
School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Education Alliance to Sponsor April Lecture Series

Pace University’s Education Alliance, a student-run organization, will sponsor a series of lectures in April in recognition of Education Month. All presentations will be held on the University’s New York City campus at 1 Pace Plaza in lower Manhattan across from City Hall Park, and are free and open to the public.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK — Pace University’s Education Alliance, a student-run organization, will sponsor a series of lectures in April in recognition of Education Month. All presentations will be held on the University’s New York City campus at 1 Pace Plaza in lower Manhattan across from City Hall Park, and are free and open to the public.

April 1: Michael Johnson, principal of the Science Skills Center in Brooklyn, will present “African American Children and Education,” at 3:30 p.m. in Lecture Hall South.

April 8: New York City Chancellor Rudy Crew will present “The Future of New York City Public Schools,” at 3:30 p.m. in the Student Union.

April 10: Ayo Harrington, activist and president of the United Parents Association, will present “Parents and Teachers: Friends or Foes,” at 3:30 p.m. in Lecture Hall South.

April 15: Fernando Ferrer, Bronx borough president and mayoral candidate, will present “Politics, Education and the Future,” at 3:30 p.m. in Lecture Hall South.

April 24: James Loewen, University of Vermont professor of sociology and author of Lies My Teacher Told Me, will present “How and Why do Teachers Lie,” at 3:30 p.m. in Lecture Hall South.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.