Journal News: “Expert: Teachers must constantly engage struggling students”

. . . Pace partnered with all three local BOCES — southern Westchester, Putnam/northern Westchester and Rockland — to convene the conference about one of the most pressing issues in education: how to better serve students who are not doing well for a multitude of reasons.

. . . Pace partnered with all three local BOCES — southern Westchester, Putnam/northern Westchester and Rockland — to convene the conference about one of the most pressing issues in education: how to better serve students who are not doing well for a multitude of reasons.

“This is what teachers do — they use what they learn from experience and research to improve,” said Fran Wills, coordinator of professional development for Pace’s School of Education and former superintendent of Briarcliff Manor schools. “Many teachers do it all the time, but teachers need to go public about what works and what you may have to do to change.”

Read the article in the Journal News.

 

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University’s School of Education Offers New College Success Program for High School Juniors and Seniors

Pace University’s School of Education today announced the launch of Headways, a new summer program to help students understand the ways they learn to achieve academic success.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Pace University’s School of Education Offers New College Success Program for High School Juniors and Seniors

NEW YORK, June 4 – Pace University’s School of Education today announced the launch of Headways, a new summer program to help students understand the ways they learn to achieve academic success.

Headways is an intensive two-week summer program for high school juniors and seniors to explore learning strategies and technology tools to help students succeed in college. Students will learn to:

•           Plan and organize (executive function)

•           Manage time effectively

•           Develop strategies for problem solving

•           Improve attention, memory and academic language

•           Enhance writing, research and presentation skills

Headways prepares students (including those with learning challenges) for the demands of college and work settings after high school. Through the program, students explore and understand their individual learning profiles and identify a personalized set of technology tools and digital strategies for academic success. After the program, students will receive detailed recommendations for digital strategies that will help them succeed in school and at work.

Developed by Pace University professors, learning specialists and college counseling professionals, Headways is grounded in current neuroscience principles. Engaging, interactive experiences include an outdoor problem-solving adventure and a full-day hands-on workshop in a neuroscience laboratory at Rockefeller University. A parent information session focused on what parents need to know to support the transition to college is also included in the program.

The program runs from August 5 – 16, and costs $1,500, with either payment in full or a $100 deposit due by July 1.

For more information, or to register a student for this dynamic learning opportunity, please visit www.pace.edu/summer or contact Karen Ferro, School of Education Senior Staff Associate, at (914) 773-3872 or e-mail kferro@pace.edu.

Media contact: Bill Caldwell, Pace, (212) 346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu.

# # #

 

NEWS ADVISORY: Pace University’s School of Education Hosts One Day Conference on Successful Practices for Students Who Struggle

Pace University’s School of Education and the regional Board of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) will present a conference, “Ensuring Learning for All Students: Sharing Successful Practices for Students Who Struggle” on May 22 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Pace Graduate Center in White Plains.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Members of the media must RSVP to attend.  Email wcaldwell@pace.edu

Pace University’s School of Education Hosts One Day Conference on Successful Practices for Students Who Struggle

White Plains, NY — May 17, 2013 — Pace University’s School of Education and the regional Board of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) will present a conference, “Ensuring Learning for All Students: Sharing Successful Practices for Students Who Struggle” on May 22 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Pace Graduate Center in White Plains. This conference is geared toward K-16 teachers, pre-service teachers, students, educational professionals and parents of students who struggle.

As schools face rigorous testing and educational standards for all students, this conference provides real, practical, evidence based strategies that can be immediately applied to the classroom, with a special emphasis on struggling students. Conference attendees will learn from teachers and researchers who have helped students make the transformation from struggling to successful.

The conference features nearly 25 workshops over three sessions, focused on students from elementary school through high school with a variety of learning differences. Attendees will have the opportunity to connect with educators from regional districts and New York City.

A keynote address by renowned academic literacy specialist Dr. Kevin Feldman is a highlight of the event. Dr. Feldman will speak on “Meaningful Engagement: Every Student, Every Lesson, Every Day.” In addition, he will present two workshops on academic vocabulary during the conference.

The event is open to the public. Cost is $75; includes morning refreshments and lunch. Registration: Jennifer DelVecchio, Putnam Northern Westchester BOCES, email jdelvecchio@pnwboces.org.

Conference information: Fran Wills, PhD, Coordinator of Professional Development, Pace’s School of Education, email fwills@pace.edu.

About Pace University

Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. For more information, please visit www.pace.edu.

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

 

# # #

 

NEWS ADVISORY: Pace University to hold STEM Collaboratory Conference on June 1

The first Pace University STEM Collaboratory Conference, sponsored by the Verizon Foundation, will be held on Saturday, June 1 in the Multipurpose Room of One Pace Plaza on the university’s Lower Manhattan campus.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Note: Members of the media must RSVP to wcaldwell@pace.edu.

Pace University to hold STEM Collaboratory Conference on June 1

New York, May 14 – The first Pace University STEM Collaboratory Conference, sponsored by the Verizon Foundation, will be held on Saturday, June 1 in the Multipurpose Room of One Pace Plaza on the university’s Lower Manhattan campus, east of City Hall and six blocks from Wall Street.

Itinerary:

8:30 to 9:30 am: Registration & Coffee. Welcome by:  Lauren Birney, assistant professor at Pace’s School of Education is the director and Jonathan Hill, associate dean of Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, is the co-director of the STEM Center Collaboratory at Pace.

9:30 to 10:15 am: Douglas Rushkoff, Media Theorist: “Program or Be Programmed: Why Students Should be Code Literate”

10:15 to 10:30 am: Coffee Break

10:30 to 11:30 am: Michael Joaquin Grey, Artist/Inventor: “The Zoob System and Its Use for Teachers & Students.” Zoob is a 3D Modeling System inspired by the nucleotides (the basic structural units of nucleic acids) that make up DNA.

11:30 am to 1:30 pm: Lunch & Poster Session on Pace Collaboratory Teacher Mobile Math and Science Apps for Android Smartphones

1:30 to 1:45 pm: Break

1:45 to 3 pm: “Perspectives in Stem Education” panel discussion moderated by Ben Esner, director, K-12 STEM Education, Polytechnic Institute at New York University. Panelists: Steve Ettlinger, author, “Twinkie, Deconstructed”; Prof. Brian Evans, Pace’s School of Education; Lou Lahana, Teacher, The Island School; Prof. Tom Lynch, Pace’s School of Education; and Meghan Groome, executive director, education and public programs, New York Academy of Science.

3 to 4 pm: Hydroponic Farming with Boswyck Farms

4 to 4:15 pm: Raffle prizes including an IPAD 2

BACKGROUND: The Pace STEM Collaboratory was created by the university’s School of Education and the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in December 2012 to facilitate interdisciplinary research and the exchange of ideas among students, faculty, and staff in STEM disciplines, and support teaching and learning at the middle and high-school levels through continued and expanded relationships with public schools in the region.

The Collaboratory’s goals include:

•           Identifying and developing a pipeline of STEM students and teachers in the greater New York area in grades 6 through 12;

•           Integrating STEM best practices in the preparation of workforce-ready students at the college level;

•           Increasing the proficiency of specially selected grade 6 through 12 teachers and administrators in STEM teaching;

•           Developing ways to motivate learners to persevere in the study of science, technology, engineering, and math; and

•           Launching an interdisciplinary STEM research group based at Pace University that will be a clearinghouse for successful initiatives in STEM education.

About Pace University

Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

# # #

 

The Hill’s Congress Blog: “Congress must act now to address mental illness in schoolchildren”

“The raft of school shootings across the country is dramatic evidence of the need to provide a better support system for children with mental illness,” writes Andrea Spencer, dean of Pace University’s School of Education and educational consultant to the Center for Children’s Advocacy.

“The raft of school shootings across the country is dramatic evidence of the need to provide a better support system for children with mental illness,” writes Andrea Spencer, dean of Pace University’s School of Education and educational consultant to the Center for Children’s Advocacy.
Read about her recent study, “Blind Spot: Unidentified Risks to Children’s Mental Health,” on The Hill’s Congress Blog.

The Hill’s Congress Blog: “Practical enhancements must not be lost in push for immigration reform”

. . . “The United States is on the verge of passing meaningful legislative reform that will enhance our ability to remain the prime destination for the best, brightest and most entrepreneurial scientific minds from around the world,” writes Jonathan Hill, co-director of the STEM Center Collaboratory at Pace. “If we care to maintain our position as the preeminent center for scientific and industrial innovation, Congress must do so.”

. . . “The United States is on the verge of passing meaningful legislative reform that will enhance our ability to remain the prime destination for the best, brightest and most entrepreneurial scientific minds from around the world,” writes Jonathan Hill, co-director of the STEM Center Collaboratory at Pace. “If we care to maintain our position as the preeminent center for scientific and industrial innovation, Congress must do so.”
Read his op-ed on The Hill’s Congress Blog.

NEWS ADVISORY: “Students with Disabilities Demonstrate Technologies that Improve Their Access to Education”

A group of New York City students with disabilities will conduct a conference on Saturday, April 27 supported by the ARISE Coalition and Pace University’s School of Education to illustrate the value of Assistive Technologies in education.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Students with Disabilities Demonstrate Technologies that Improve Their Access to Education

 “Inclusion Requires Participation” event co-sponsored by Pace University’s School of Education to be held Saturday, Apr. 27

New York, NY — Apr. 23 — A group of New York City students with disabilities will conduct a conference on Saturday, April 27 supported by the ARISE Coalition and Pace University’s School of Education to illustrate the value of Assistive Technologies in education.

The event, “Inclusion Requires Participation,” will consist of student-run demonstrations on effective technology solutions for addressing learning, communication, and physical challenges in the classroom.

Achieving successful inclusion requires both educational insight and adaptive tools to make classroom activities accessible to students with disabilities. Assistive Technologies and Alternative Augmentative Communication devices have radically altered educational perceptions as to who can be a learner, and the goal of this event is to acknowledge real students who have benefited from those technologies.

WHO: Educators, therapists, parents, advocates, and students interested in assistive technologies

WHAT: Inclusion Requires Participation: Student Demonstrations of Assistive Technology Solutions for Learning, Communication, and Physical Challenges

Some of the presentations by students will address the following topics:

•           Accessible Literacy Materials for Emerging Readers

•           Alternative Output Tools for Writing Challenges

•           Note-taking Tools for Auditory Processing Challenges

•           iPad-based Communication Apps for Nonverbal Children

•           Math and Computer Access Supports for Physical Challenges

•           Voice Dictation Tools on the Computer and the Web

•           Cloud-Based Tools which Address many Learning Challenges

•           Apps for Transitions, ADL’s, and Behavioral Supports

The conference will include a student round table discussion on the importance of assessment, training, and integration of technology for inclusion. Local agencies will also be on hand to provide more detailed information on free assistive technology services and supports.

DATE/TIME: Saturday, April 27, 8:30 – 3:00 pm

LOCATION: Pace University, New York City campus, Student Union on B-level, One Pace Plaza, New York, NY.

REGISTRATION: This is a free event, but due to limited seating capacity, it requires registration. To register, please visit http://cognitechcafe.com/styled-6/contact-form/index.php, contact Mark Surabian at ATHelp@me.com, or call (917) 586-8000.

Media contact: Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu.

# # #

CNBC.com: “Why Businesses Prefer a Liberal Arts Education”

. . . “Companies want people who are functionally literate and can read and write,” said Jonathan Hill, co-director of the Stem Center at Pace University. “When business students come here, they learn the computer languages but we also make them take a foreign language. The idea is to have graduates strong in their chosen business area and in the arts, like writing and reading.”

. . . “Companies want people who are functionally literate and can read and write,” said Jonathan Hill, co-director of the Stem Center at Pace University. “When business students come here, they learn the computer languages but we also make them take a foreign language. The idea is to have graduates strong in their chosen business area and in the arts, like writing and reading.”

Read the story on CNBC.com.

NBC Latino: “Challenges and tips for raising bilingual children”

. . . Dr. Xiao-Lei Wang, a professor at Pace University in New York, says that young children can be exposed to many languages at once. Exposing children to more than one language as early as possible may ensure native-like proficiency in these languages.

. . . Dr. Xiao-Lei Wang, a professor at Pace University in New York, says that young children can be exposed to many languages at once. Exposing children to more than one language as early as possible may ensure native-like proficiency in these languages. “Human capacity for language acquisition at an early age is unlimited,” Wang says. “However, practically speaking, it is more realistic and manageable for parents to raise children with two or three languages successfully in the home environment.”

According to Wang, one reason for focusing on only two or three languages is because a child needs a sufficient input to acquire a language (it has been suggested that at least 25% input is necessary to acquire a language). She also says that to form a habit of communication in a given language in early childhood, parents need to speak consistently to a child in that language.

Read the article by NBC Latino.

Education Week blog K-12 Parents and the Public: “Better Parent-Teacher Conferences Goal of Online Class”

. . . Joan Walker, an associate professor in the School of Education at Pace University in Pleasantville, N.Y., is working to improve the parent-teacher conference, beginning with her student teachers at Pace—but with the potential to reach educators anywhere who want to try her free online training.

. . . Joan Walker, an associate professor in the School of Education at Pace University in Pleasantville, N.Y., is working to improve the parent-teacher conference, beginning with her student teachers at Pace—but with the potential to reach educators anywhere who want to try her free online training.

Read about it on the Education Week blog K-12 Parents and the Public.