NEWS RELEASE: Pace Media and Communication Arts Students Travel to Mexico to Film Endangered Turtles

¡Viva la Tortuga! Meshing Conservation and Culture in Magdalena Bay, the latest addition to a series of prize-winning short documentaries on sustainable use of the world’s living resources shot by Pace University students and faculty, will premiere at a screening on May 7.

Documentary Film Premiere at Pace University May 7

Pace Media and Communication Arts Students Travel to Mexico to Film Endangered Turtles

PLEASANTVILLE, NY – ¡Viva la Tortuga! Meshing Conservation and Culture in Magdalena Bay, the latest addition to a series of prize-winning short documentaries on sustainable use of the world’s living resources shot by Pace University students and faculty, will premiere at a screening on May 7 at 4 p.m. at Pace University’s Pleasantville campus, 861 Bedford Rd., entrance 1, Willcox Auditorium.

The student filmmakers and their professors will hold a panel discussion on the making of the film. The event is free and open to the public. RSVP is required. Contact Bea Simon at bsimon@pace.edu.  Media admission is by press pass.

This year’s filmmaking team ventured to Magdalena Bay, an 870-square-mile haven for whales, dolphins, sea birds and five species of sea turtles tucked along the Pacific coast of Mexico’s Baja peninsula north of the tourist hub of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. The documentary chronicles how communities that once depended on sea turtle poaching and other extractive activities depleting the region’s rich natural resources are now testing with a new economic model, one built around conservation and sustainable tourism.  The short film provides an intimate portrait of those working to balance economic advancement with environmental protection and striving to create a better life for both the community and the endangered sea turtles.

The documentary was shot, written and edited by a team of 12 students led by Professor Maria Luskay, PhD, program director of the Master of Arts in Media and Communication Arts at Pace University and Senior Fellow Andrew Revkin of the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, who also writes the award-winning Dot Earth blog for The New York Times.

In the documentary course, created 10 years ago by Luskay, a mix of graduate and undergraduate students produce a short film each spring, spending January and February reporting and planning the shoot – which consumes much of their March spring “break” — and then editing and producing the final product. In past years Luskay has taken students to the Netherlands, Portugal, the Bahamas, Brazil, Costa Rica, and Tuscany, and elsewhere to produce films. Previous films can be seen on The New York Times Web site.

For interviews with the student filmmakers, Luskay or Revkin, contact Cara Cea in the Pace office of public information, ccea@pace.edu, (914) 906-9680. The making of the film is detailed on the students’ blog. Follow the students on Twitter @PaceBaja and on Facebook. Click here for the link to information on last year’s documentary and a list of previous films and the awards they have won.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact: Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu, 914-906-9680

NEWS RELEASE: Pace Performing Arts Presents “Dance Out Loud 2013”

Pace Performing Arts presents “Dance Out Loud 2013,” featuring the piece “Dance in a Straight Line” by choreographer Mandy Moore from “So You Think You Can Dance” April 26 and 27 at Pace’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts.

Pace Performing Arts presents “Dance Out Loud 2013”

NEW YORK – Pace Performing Arts presents “Dance Out Loud 2013,” featuring the piece “Dance in a Straight Line” by choreographer Mandy Moore from “So You Think You Can Dance” April 26 and 27 at Pace’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts.

The event was conceived and directed by Rhonda Miller, director of Pace Performing Arts’ BFA Commercial Dance Program, which is the first of its kind in New York City. Works by acclaimed Pace faculty will be a highlight of the evening, starring 50 Pace Commercial Dance students, including Callie Gullickson, Briana Kohn, Madison Embrey. Dance Out Loud will also feature excerpts from “Rodeo,” by Agnes DeMille and staged by Paul Sutherland, “Psalm,” by Jose Limon staged by Jonathan Riedel, and “Oh What a World,” by Cirque du Soleil choreographer Cherice Barton. These guest works have been funded by the Voice of an Angel Foundation.

WHEN: Friday, April 26 at 8 p.m. and Saturday, April 27 at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m.

WHERE: Pace University’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, 3 Spruce Street (east of City Hall), New York, NY 10038. Directions: http://bit.ly/qxH0g3

TICKETS: $8 for students/seniors; $12 for adults at the door or reserve in advance on the web OVATIONTIX.COM/TRS/PR/922120

Choreographers: Cherice Barton, Agnes DeMille (staged by Paul Sutherland), Jeremy Duvall, Lauren Gaul, Jessica Hendricks, Scott Jovovich, Jose Limon (staged by Jonathan Riedel), Jen Littlefield, Rhonda Miller, Mandy Moore, Alisa Paradowski, Gregg Russell, Stephanie Torbik. Costume Design: Angela Wendt; Lighting Design: Graham Kindred.

About Performing Arts Programs at Dyson College of Arts and Science at Pace University: Undergraduate: Dyson College’s Department of Performing Arts offers Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees in Acting, Musical Theater, and Commercial Dance, the International Performance Ensemble that includes a Bachelor of Art in Acting and a Bachelor of Arts in Directing, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Theater Arts in Design and Production for Theater, Television, and Film Concentration. The department presents more than 50 performances every year. In 2006, Pace became only the second school in New York City to offer a BFA in Musical Theater. 

http://www.pace.edu/performingarts.

Pace Performing Arts Commercial Dance program, the first of its kind in New York, is an exclusive blend of the highest quality of professional dance training. In this conservatory-style program, students are prepared for a career that includes stage, television, film and commercials with training by current working professionals in a variety of pertinent dance styles such as Ballet, Jazz, Modern, Theater Dance, Tap, Contemporary, Hip Hop and Aerial Arts. Acting, vocal studies and technical theater skills are also part of the program.

Graduate: The Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University, also located in Dyson College, is the only MFA (Acting, Directing and Playwriting) theatre program officially sanctioned by the legendary Actors Studio (co-presidents Ellen Burstyn, Harvey Keitel and Al Pacino). All MFA students participate in the Craft Seminars known to the world as the Bravo Network television series Inside the Actors Studio (taped at Pace’s Schimmel Theater and open to students), hosted by James Lipton, Dean Emeritus and Co-Founder of the Actors Studio Drama School. www.Pace.edu/ASDS

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media Contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

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Photo credit: Jenny Sharp

 

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University Students March a Mile with Buckets to Raise Money for Clean Water in Tanzania

Today one hundred twenty Pace University students marched a mile with buckets of water on their heads to reenact the grueling task thousands in the developing world endure each day to provide water for their families. $5,000 was raised for Engineers Without Borders, Northern New Jersey Professional Chapter, to create a community water well in Islanjandugu, Tanzania.

Pace University Students March a Mile with Buckets to Raise Money for Clean Water in Tanzania

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, April 20, 2013 – Today one hundred twenty Pace University students marched a mile with buckets of water on their heads to reenact the grueling task thousands in the developing world endure each day to provide water for their families. But the students’ burdens were eased knowing $5,000 would be donated to Engineers Without Borders, Northern New Jersey Professional Chapter, to create a community water well in Islanjandugu, Tanzania.

The Walk for World Water, organized by the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies in partnership with Pace Athletics, began at the Pace student center and streamed onto Bedford Road in Pleasantville, where dozens of cars honked their support for the unusual parade. The students, carrying orange buckets high in the air, were led by the university’s athletic teams. The water walkers reentered the campus and returned to their starting point, where students were relieved to lower their buckets and ease their aching arms, necks, and shoulders.

The event was also co-sponsored by Pace’s Golden Key International Honour Society, Sigma Iota Chi and Peace and Justice Society.  The Home Depot generously provided funding for the buckets.

“Ours was a small effort compared to what happens in some communities throughout the developing world,” said Michelle Land, Pace Academy’s director. “The task falls to women and children to haul water, often of terrible quality, in some cases as far as four miles. Things we take for granted here, such as a faucet in the home, are beyond their experience.”

“You can tell people stories and show them pictures of what it is like to travel miles for water, but until they do it themselves or travel to these countries, they won’t understand,” said Chinyere Ojini, project leader for the Tanzania project, and communications specialist for AECOM. “But because of this event, students at Pace now understand what it is like to have to do this every day.”

About Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies: A freestanding institute within the Office of the Provost, Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies is a university-wide initiative to renew and deepen Pace’s time-honored commitment to environmental research, scholarship, and service.  Because the study of the environment is inherently interdisciplinary, the Pace Academy engages expertise across departments within Pace’s schools and colleges. The mission of Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies is to advance the understanding of the mutually enhancing relationship between nature and society through a University-wide program of interdisciplinary pedagogy, scholarship, policy development and service.  Pace Academy also serves as the headquarters for the Environmental Consortium of Colleges & Universities.  www.pace.edu/academy

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

NEWS RELEASE: Live concert featuring artist-in-residence Adam Guettel accompanied by Pace University BFA Musical Theater students and alumni

The Pace University Department of Performing Arts is producing a concert of works by Adam Guettel , performed Tony award-winning composer of the musicals The Light in the Piazza, Floyd Collins, Myths & Hymns and accompanied by Pace Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) Musical Theater students and alumni.

 

Pace University Department of Performing Arts and the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts Announces ADAM GUETTEL IN CONCERT – Tuesday, April 30, 2013 at 8 p.m.

Live concert featuring Adam Guettel performing his own music accompanied on stage by Pace University BFA Musical Theater students and alumni.

Directed by Amy Rogers; Music Direction by Robert Meffe, Andrew Smithson, and Joel Waggoner

“The theatre composer Adam Guettel is so overwhelmingly gifted that any news of his activities stirs the kind of fervent expectations that surround Stephen Sondheim, and before that, Leonard Bernstein.”  –The New York Times, February 20, 2013

NEW YORK, April 5 – The Pace University Department of Performing Arts is producing a concert of works by Adam Guettel , performed Tony award-winning composer  of the musicals The Light in the Piazza, Floyd Collins, Myths & Hymns and accompanied by Pace Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) Musical Theater students and alumni. This concert is the culmination of a year-long artist-in-residency in which Guettel taught classes in musical theory, song interpretation, musical theater history and composition, as well tested material from a new project with Pace students.

Adam Guettel in Concert will be presented at Pace’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts located at 3 Spruce St. in lower Manhattan on April 30 at 8 p.m.  For reservations call Ovation Tickets at 866-811-4111 or visit https://web.ovationtix.com/trs/pr/922331.

Adam Guettel (Composer) Adam Guettel is a composer/lyricist living in New York City. His musical, The Light in the Piazza (cast album on Nonesuch Records, premiered on Broadway in April 2005. The musical won six 2005 Tony Awards, with two going to Guettel for Best Original Score and Best Orchestrations. His songs garnered a Grammy nomination for best cast recording. The Light in the Piazza also received 5 Drama Desk Awards, including Best Music and Best Orchestrations for Guettel.  His other works include the Obie Award-winning Floyd Collins, Love’s Fire, and Saturn Returns. Guettel is currently working on four new musicals and an opera. Other accolades for Guettel include the Stephen Sondheim Award (1990), the ASCAP New Horizons Award (1997), and the American Composers Orchestra Award (2005). Guettel is the son of composer, author and Juilliard School chairman Mary Rodgers and grandson of legendary musical theater composer Richard Rodgers.

Amy Rogers (Director) created the BFA Musical Theater degree program at Pace which began in 2002 with 6 majors and now has over 100. Rogers’ directing credits include: Full productions include Merrily We Roll Along, Anyone Can Whistle, Elegies, Ragtime, Carousel, Wild Party (Lippa), The Most Happy Fella, Flora The Red Menace, Little Women, My Name is Alice, Urinetown, Violet, Pippin, Into The Woods, Funny Girl, and A Grand Night for Singing. Rogers has assisted critically-acclaimed director Lonny Price on the Pre-Broadway workshop of 110 in The Shade starring Audra McDonald, the Emmy Award-winning Passion for Live at Lincoln Center on PBS; Candide with the New York Philharmonic; Anyone Can Whistle at the Ravinia Festival, and both Kismet and Can-Can with Encores! at City Center.

Robert Meffe (Music Director) is the Director of Music for the BFA Musical Theater Program at Pace. Broadway: Associate Conductor of Little Women and the last six years of Les Miserables, keyboards for Evita (2012 revival), Newsies, The Phantom of the Opera, Avenue Q, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, Grey Gardens and Bombay Dreams.  National Tours: Music Director of The Phantom of the Opera, Associate Conductor of Sunday in the Park with George. Off-Broadway: Violet, The Prince and the Pauper, Gutenberg! The Musical! and Lightin’ Out. TV: Earth To America (TBS), Renee Fleming-Live at Lincoln Center (PBS). Las Vegas: Associate Conductor of Avenue Q, keyboards for Mamma Mia and Hairspray. Williamstown Theatre Festival/McCarter Theater at Princeton University: Ten Cents a Dance (Associate Music Director). Yale Institute for Musical Theatre: sam i was (Music Director).

About Dyson College of Arts and Science’s Performing Arts Programs at Pace University: Undergraduate: Dyson’s Department of Performing Arts offers Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees in Acting, Musical Theater, and Commercial Dance and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Theater Arts International Performance Ensemble. The department presents over 50 performances every year. In 2006, Pace became only the second school in New York City to offer a BFA in Musical Theater.  http://www.pace.edu/performingarts.

 

Graduate: The Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University, also located in Dyson College, is the only MFA (Acting, Directing and Playwriting) theatre program officially sanctioned by the legendary Actors Studio (co-presidents Ellen Burstyn, Harvey Keitel and Al Pacino). All MFA students participate in the Craft Seminars known to the world as the Bravo Network television series Inside the Actors Studio (taped at Pace’s Schimmel Theater and open to students), hosted by James Lipton, Dean Emeritus and Co-Founder of the Actors Studio Drama School. www.Pace.edu/ASDS

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contacts: Cara Cea, Pace Media Relations, ccea@pace.edu; 914-773-3312 or 914-906-9680; Robert Meffe, Music Director, rmeffe@pace.edu, 917-297-3897

Broadway World: Sundance Film Festival to Feature Three Pace University Performing Arts Actors

Broadway World featured news about Pace Performing Arts at Sundance Film Festival.

Broadway World featured news about Pace Performing Arts at Sundance Film Festival.

From Broadway World:

This week two Pace University acting students and one professor will appear in films at the Sundance Film Festival which runs January 17 – 27. Lecturer Julie Fain Lawrence is appearing in a film that is among the 16 films chosen for the US Dramatic Competition. In all, 119 films were chosen for the festival out of 12,146 submissions.

Anna Friedman, a BFA Acting major at Pace, has a supporting role in the feature film “Milkshake,” accepted for the NEXT category of films at Sundance with a forward-thinking approach to storytelling.

In “Milkshake,” directed by David Andalman, we follow the tragic sex life of Jolie Jolson, a wannabe thug (and great-great-grandson of legendary vaudevillian Al Jolson) in suburban DC as he strives to become something he can never be – black.

Pace BFA Acting Lecturer Julie Fain Lawrence has a leading role in “Concussion” a film directed by Stacie Passon in the US Dramatic category at Sundance. Lawrence received her BA from the UCLA Department of Theatre, Film & Television, training at the British American Drama Academy, and graduated with an MFA from the Yale School of Drama. In “Concussion,” a woman decides her life can’t be only about the house and the kids. She needs more. She needs an alter ego, “Eleanor.”

Also appearing at Sundance in “Interior. Leather Bar” in the New Frontier category is Pace BA Acting student Jake Robbins. Robbins has also studied at the Stella Adler Acting Studio and was recently in an award-winning short film “Teens Like Phil” among other projects. In “Interior. Leather Bar,” filmmakers James Franco and Travis Mathews were inspired by rumored-to-be-lost gay S&M footage from William Friedkin’s 1980 thriller “Cruising,” and explore the limits of sexual and creative freedom.

Since 1981, Sundance Institute has evolved to an internationally-recognized nonprofit that advances the work of risk-taking storytellers worldwide. Founded by Robert Redford in the mountains of Sundance, Utah, Sundance Institute provides a space for independent artists to explore stories free from commercial and political pressures. Sundance Institute is committed to discovering and developing independent artists and provides year-round creative and financial support for the development of original stories for the screen and stage.

via Sundance Film Festival to Feature Three Pace University Performing Arts Actors.

Hello Central New York: FIRST Tech Challenge

A segment on Hello Central New York, a local news program that covers the Utica area, covered a FIRST Lego scrimmage and mentioned the upcoming Pace tournament several times.

The Hudson Valley FIRST Tech Challenge (FTC) Robotics Tournament is once again happening at Pace in Pleasantville on Sunday, January 27.

A segment on Hello Central New York, a local news program that covers the Utica area, covered a FIRST Lego scrimmage and mentioned the Pace tournament several times. 

View the segment here.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University Teams Up with HooplaHa.com

The Pace Master’s program in Media, Communications and Visual Arts incorporated HooplaHa, a startup website dedicated to spreading positivity, in their semester’s course load. (Left: Yulia Moore).

Posted on behalf of HooplaHa:

Pace University Teams Up with HooplaHa.com to

Spread Positivity and Creativity

Pleasantville, NY (January 4, 2013) – Pace University, a NY-based private university, and HooplaHa.com have joined forces to put happiness and creativity into action. The Pace Master’s program in Media, Communications and Visual Arts incorporated HooplaHa, a startup website dedicated to spreading positivity, in their semester’s course load.

Dr. Maria T. Luskay, professor of the Digital Video Field Production course in the Master’s program, advocates for real-world experiences inside the classroom. Based on experiential education and a hands-on approach, students act as a production team to complete a final project.  In this particular case, the final project was to create a positive and inspirational video for HooplaHa.com.

Managing Director of HooplaHa™, Rob Hess believes the partnership is the perfect match. “We need content. Why not give these students the opportunity to have their work published and featured on our site? It’s such a thrill for them and exactly in line with our mission,” said Hess.

The HooplaHa Content Team attended the class in the start of the semester to tell students about the mission of HooplaHa.com and what was needed for the final project. In groups of 3-4, students created a final video product and the HooplaHa Content Team chose a winner to be featured on the site.

“We judged the videos based on production value, storytelling, and their ability to deliver a product that fits our goals,” said Stephanie Bousquet, Director of Content. Amare Kone, Olivia Hunter and Yulia Moore were the final winners with their video, Aunt B’s Secret to Happiness. The winning group was inspired to create this video about Aunt B because they felt her contagious spirit and zest for life is a perfect match for HooplaHa.com.

Olivia Hunter
Amara Kone

About HooplaHa

HooplaHa.com, an innovative website, is positively impacting people around the world by sharing content guaranteed to make you Think, Relate & Smile! HooplaHais owned by Only Good News, LLC, a Fairfield County, Connecticut based company. For more information on how you too can change the world one inspiration at a time, visit us at www.HooplaHa.com.

Media Contact: Erin McNichols, emcnichols@hooplaha.com, 203-956-7366

Westchester Magazine: Top 8 Leaders in Westchester

Three of Westchester Magazine’s top 8 leaders in Westchester County are from Pace. “The Riverkeeper” John Cronin, “The Eco-advocate” Nick Robinson and “The Cyber-Security ‘Type’ ” Logan Romm were all featured with interviews and photos among the top 8 in a recent article in the magazine.

Three of Westchester Magazine’s top 8 leaders in Westchester County are from Pace. “The Riverkeeper” John Cronin, “The Eco-advocate” Nick Robinson and “The Cyber-Security ‘Type’ ” Logan Romm were all featured with interviews and photos among the top 8 in a recent article in the magazine.

From Westchester Magazine about the 8 leaders:

… “Westchesterites are looking at our biggest issues and, hopefully, will alter the way we live for the better. They’re impacting Westchester, New York, the USA, and the whole world. These are the 2013 Game Changers.”

About John Cronin, Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs, Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies:

“You can go on your iPhone, and you can know temperature, humidity, and wind speed in Johannesburg, South Africa, in real time,” says John Cronin, senior fellow for Environmental Affairs at the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies in Pleasantville. “But there’s nobody who can tell you—in real time—what’s in your glass of drinking water.”

The fact is disconcerting, but Cronin, 62, aims to change it. He’s organized dropping  sensors in the Hudson and its tributaries to monitor water quality and conditions. But Cronin wants to go further. In addition to changing how we keep our river clean—a project he’s been working on for 40 years—he wants to change the partnerships we enlist to help solve environmental problems.

In October 1973, Cronin was working painting houses when he met Pete Seeger at an event for Seeger’s environmental advocacy and educational vessel, the Hudson River Sloop Clearwater. The two men embarked on a volunteer project: As Seeger sang sea shanties and yodeled, the folk icon brought Cronin into the environmental world. Seeger would insist that, “‘if we all work together, we can clean up the Hudson River.’ I thought that idea was ludicrous,” says Cronin. “The River was huge, horribly polluted.” Nonetheless, inspired by Seeger, Cronin began a career in environmental issues, eventually taking stints advising Republican Congressman Hamilton Fish, Jr., and Democratic New York State Assemblyman Maurice Hinchey.

“I was hooked,” he says. “I went from thinking Pete was out of his mind to thinking that, if you were determined enough, you could make an enormous difference.” Becoming the inaugural Hudson Riverkeeper in 1983, Cronin acted as the clean-water advocate for the River and its tributaries, which provide 9 million New Yorkers with drinking water.

Thanks to Cronin’s media savvy and some real luck—while filming a segment for NBC news, he came upon an Exxon oil tanker discharging pollutants just 1,500 feet from drinking water—and the program took off. Soon, there was a Soundkeeper for Long Island, then a Baykeeper in San Francisco. Today, there are more than 200 similar programs all over the world. During his time as Riverkeeper, Cronin took on all kinds of polluters: New York City, for instance, was dumping 1.5 billion gallons of sewage into the River every day. But many of those on the opposite side of litigation were corporations.

In the past decade, however, Cronin began to formulate different ideas about problem-solving on the environment. He felt that we were “mostly operating under twentieth-century models when twenty-first-century problems need all the talent, all the skills we can muster—no mater where they come from.” Enforcement was still a primary goal, he thought, but the expertise, technology, and capital available in the private sector were nothing to eschew, either. In 2004, he founded the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries, which is today part of Clarkson University, with just this collaborative goal in mind.

One alliance, with Armonk-based IBM, has proved crucial in Cronin’s water-monitoring efforts. John Kelly, a senior vice president and director of Yorktown’s IBM Research (who oversees some 3,000 scientists in laboratories around the world), agrees that Cronin’s ideas are the future. “I think he embodies a visionary who can identify what’s really important through all the clutter. Other people were dreaming, but he knew what to do. His ideas are contagious, and he has the wherewithal to get it done.”

About Nick Robinson, University Professor and Gilbert & Sarah Kerlin Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law, Pace University:

“No, the fights for conservation and against climate change aren’t totally new. So, even if Pace University Law Professor Nicholas Robinson is at the center of both of those struggles, why do we think he also has the next big idea? It’s not just because he was around and affecting policy at the highest levels back when it was a new idea, although he was. Nor is it because his predictions about flooding recently have proven sadly accurate, although they have. It’s because, with all this experience, he knows exactly what we’re going to have to do about it all.

Robinson, of Sleepy Hollow, grew up mostly in Palo Alto, California, where he enjoyed outdoor activities like camping in the Sierras, but the East Coast-style air and water pollution he saw when he started college at Brown University in the early 1960s made him begin taking the study of environmental policy seriously. By 1972, just two years after Robinson graduated from Columbia Law School, New York had adopted his draft of the landmark Tidal Wetlands Act, and “the UN was waking up to the concerns of the environment,” says Robinson, 67. “I was asked by the Sierra Club to attend the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment in Stockholm.”

In the late 1970s, Robinson helped found one of the first environmental law programs in the country at Pace Law School. He was an advisor to Governor Mario Cuomo, general counsel and deputy commissioner of the State Department of Environmental Conservation, and a treaty delegate to the Soviet Union under five presidents. As if all of that weren’t enough, he’s even made his mark on the County’s cultural life, orchestrating the donation of the old Philipse Manor train station to the Hudson Valley Writers’ Center for its headquarters in the late 1980s before such plans for renovation and re-use were common.

But it’s his international work that set the stage for him to establish some of the most important coming trends in the environmental movement. He has helped instruct environmental groups on what legal systems they’ll encounter in writing international treaties, harmonized treaties on endangered species that migrate across borders, and helped establish trans-boundary cooperation for contested areas like the Arctic Circle. “But locally, the same issues play out,” he says. Dealing with climate change means finding money for repairs, reinforcing or altering infrastructure, managing native flora to mitigate flooding, drafting environmental impact statements, and taking other measures that Robinson has long been a part of.

“I’ve been working with the faculty at our Pleasantville campus to organize the Pocantico River Watershed Conservancy,” he said, 12 days before Superstorm Sandy made landfall in New Jersey. “How should it be inter-managed to protect the downstream communities from flooding? It’s not a question of if; it’s only a question of when. We need to get ready for the ‘retreat from the coasts,’ moving infrastructure inland. If you have a road or a pipeline or a buffer right along a coastal area and you don’t help adapt where the river water can go, then you’re going to end up having storms cause a lot of property damage. We cannot save the Hudson River unless we better save the tributaries of the Hudson. We need to take the experiences we have around the world and begin actually solving our local problems. And then we have to share that with similarly situated people all over the world.”

About Seidenberg School student Logan Romm, keystroke biometrics researcher:

“If you’ve logged onto an online retailer’s website months after you last shopped there and found that you were still signed in or if you’ve ever noticed that your email was still logged in after returning from a vacation, then you can well imagine how easy it would be for a cyber bad guy to access your information. But if 27-year-old Logan Romm’s project takes off, those bad guys are going to have to work much harder.

The White Plains resident, who grew up in Rye Brook, has a full-time job as a marketing manager at Verizon, but it was his studies in Internet Technology at Pace University, where he earned his master’s in 2012, that are helping to close these security holes. Along with four other teammates (and dozens of graduate students who have put in time since the project started seven years ago), Romm is studying keystroke biometrics—in other words, identifying people by how they type—and developing its potential for security applications. There is, after all, a surprisingly large amount of data in keystrokes—how quickly people type certain letter combinations, how they scroll, if they prefer the number pad or the numbers above the letters—and, like a fingerprint or an iris, individuals’ typing characteristics are unique to them.

The applications of figuring out how to recognize those unique features are nearly limitless. Authenticating students taking tests online comes to mind. Corporations with proprietary research on their servers and governments with classified documents to protect are always looking for the next step in security. And, as Romm points out, this may be it. After all, passwords can be stolen or guessed, and a single entry often keeps users logged in to sensitive information for hours or even days after they leave the console. But monitoring keystrokes allows ongoing authentication of users, “so, even if an intruder gains access initially, if they are not behaving the way the actual user does then that access could be detected and the unauthorized user’s session could be terminated,” he says. The project’s director, Professor Charles Tappert, has been in touch with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency at the US Department of Defense, although nothing has been finalized.

Romm and his teammates began their work last year, but they were responsible for the meat of the seven-year-old project: collecting typing samples and analyzing them, including the first samples of people working on browsers.

“It’s getting harder and harder to create a secure a password,” Romm says, “but this definitely makes a lot of sense for the next level.”

Read the full article here.

Armonk Daily Voice: Byram Hills Grad Excels At Pace In Academic Competition

A member of Pace’s Federal Reserve Challenge Team was featured by her hometown media. (Left: Kelsey Berro, second from the left, stands with her College Federal Reserve Challenge teammates at Nationals, where they finished third.)

Armonk native and 2011 Byram Hills High School graduate Kelsey Berro just finished a 2012 College Federal Reserve Challenge season to remember.

Her Pace University undergraduate team won first place in New York State in November and just finished third in the national round, which was held in Washington, D.C.

The College Federal Reserve Challenge is a national academic competition consisting of a 15-minute economic presentation followed by a 15-minute question and answer period. During the Q&A portion, students address questions about finance, economics, banking, and monetary policy administered by a panel of professionals who work at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

Berro, now a sophomore, was one of five students on this year’s team. Her four teammates — Nashrah Ahmed, William Hellander, Daniel Boutarel and Sonia Sternick — were seniors.

“I was able to absorb a huge amount of knowledge quickly due to their guidance and mentorship,” said Berro. “Each team member has their individual strengths, whether in bank regulation or federal communication policy, and we were able to learn from each other.”

Pace beat 29 other colleges in three rounds of competition, including Hamilton, Cornell and New York University. The team also received the Lloyd Bromberg Teamwork Award for team coordination and presentation.

“There is a stigma that teams from big-name schools will automatically be our strongest competitors, but Pace University has been consistently placing in the winners circle at the Fed for the past few years,” said Berro.

Berro credits a big part of her success to her time at Byram Hills.

“Byram Hills High School prepares you very well for college,” she said. “The teachers at Byram expect a lot from you. At the time it seemed like too much work, but now I realize they were just preparing us for upper-level learning.”

Byram Hills Grad Excels At Pace In Academic Competition | The Armonk Daily Voice.

Journal News and Patch.com: Pace University Students Aid Others by Integrating Technology Into Daily Life

Three computer science students in Professor Jean Coppola’s class were featured in articles in The Journal News and on White Plains and Rye Patch.com. (Left: A Kensington Assisted Living resident using an iPad, one of the devices Nicole Morandi and Janelle Wallace teach those living at the home how to navigate. / Nicole Morandi)

Three computer science students in Professor Jean Coppola’s class were featured in articles, about their work helping older adults, in The Journal News and on White Plains and Rye Patch.com.

From The Journal News:

“Through a combination of volunteerism and invention, three students from Pace University have created a way for those with disabilities to comfortably approach technology.

A project for Nicole Morandi, Jennifer Simon and Janelle Wallace’s class, “Computers, Hardware and Troubleshooting” inspired them to give back to people in need.

These women wanted to help those who are physically impaired and decided to do this by making tablet and electronic reading devices more accessible. They replaced the usual metal or plastic stylus pen cover with a soft exterior. The pointers, called “Smile Gear” comes in multiple colors, are flexible and accessible for people with limited hand mobility.

“Not only are they an aid to these individuals, but it will also boost their confidence by putting a smile on their faces and making them feel ‘cool’ about using it,” Simon and Wallace said in a joint statement.

Morandi and Wallace have also been visiting the Kensington Assisted Living in White Plains. Each week they meet with four residents with early to moderate stages of dementia for one-on-one computer lessons. The students have been teaching these elderly individuals how to use their iPads and send emails to relatives.

Another group member, Simon volunteered with Cerebral Palsy of Westchester, N.Y., where she helped to resolve hardware problems for an attendee having troubling using his wheelchair-adapted iPad. Previously, the iPad would easily fall off the chair, but Simon and CPW staff secured the device by adding an additional part. Simon then found and donated the piece so that the problem would be resolved permanently.

Visit their websites to learn more.”

Read the full articles in The Journal News and on Patch.com.

Pace University Students Aid Others by Integrating Technology Into Daily Life – White Plains, NY Patch.