Pace Professor Wins Nomination and Almost Certainly Election as a New York State Senator from the Bronx

When Gustavo Rivera, a Pace adjunct professor for five years, won nomination and almost certainly election as a New York State senator from the Bronx, his Pace connection was the finishing line in a story in The New York Times, as well as on Fox TV’s local channel’s “Good Day New York.”

When Gustavo Rivera, a Pace adjunct professor for five years, won nomination and almost certainly election as a New York State senator from the Bronx, his Pace connection was the finishing line in a story in The New York Times, as well as on Fox TV’s local channel’s “Good Day New York.”

*Photo credit: Suzanne DeChillo/ The New York Times

Read the New York Times article, “Election Assured, Victor Over Espada Will Face a Tough Job in Albany,” here:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/16/nyregion/16bronx.html?partner=rss&emc=rss

The Largest Spanish Newspaper in the U.S. Seeks Pace Professor’s Expertise

La Opinión, the Largest Spanish-language newspaper in the U.S. quoted Pace’s director of the Counseling Center and Associate Professor or Psychology, Dr. Richard Shadick.

La Opinión, the largest Spanish-language newspaper in the U.S., quoted Pace’s director of the Counseling Center and Associate Professor of Psychology, Dr. Richard Shadick, about the impact of the recession on the mental health of students.

Translated text of the article:

Kristina Segura-Baird is now considered a “normal” teenager. But for a long time she had to cope in silence with the negative emotions caused by the sexual abuse she suffered.

“I did not want to talk to anyone about this, but now I’m glad to have received professional help,” says Young, who participated yesterday in a ceremony to support new laws that expand mental health services in schools.

Alarming data revealed that suicide is the third most common cause of death among 15 to 24 years and according to the American Academy of Pediatrics , one in five children and adolescents in the country suffer from some kind of mental problem, which is now compounded by the current economic crisis.

Dr. Richard Shadick , director of the Counseling Center at Pace University in New York and associate professor of psychology, said that the situation has worsened in recent times.

“Young people are suffering from the stress in their families and there are fewer services due to budget cuts,” says Shadick, noting that all of this greatly affects their academic performance as well as spurs other social ills.

Mental health programs were cut by 4% in 2009 and 5% in 2010, and will be reduced by 8% in 2011 – at a time when they are needed most.

A recent survey conducted jointly by The New York Times and CBS shows that four out of 10 children of unemployed parents show behavioral changes.  But Shadick clarifies that in many cases parents are so affected by their own problems, they don’t even notice these changes in their children.

Convinced that many of these problems can be prevented, Congresswoman Grace Napolitano spoke yesterday before a packed auditorium at the middle school youth Eastmont the Montebello Unified School District ( MUSD ).

Both she and a player for the Lakers, Ron Artest, shared some personal experiences, emphasizing the idea that we should not feel embarrassed when asking for help.

“I am a better father and husband because I have spent a lot of time and money to receive counseling. But I think everyone should have free access to these services,” said Artest.

Napolitano, author of the measure, HR 2531 Mental Health Act in Schools, stated that if it is approved by the legislature, the plan she created in 2001 in his district which has now expanded to 11 schools, including Eastmont, could be replicated throughout the country.

“What motivated me to create the program was to learn that one in three young Latinas has contemplated suicide,” said Napolitano.

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To read the article in Spanish, visit http://www.impre.com/laopinion/noticias/primera-pagina/2010/9/10/salud-mental-recibe-apoyo-209816-1.html#commentsBlock

New Scholarship Fund for Black Music Pioneer Covered by New York Daily News Online

Pace’s new scholarship fund for black music pioneer Sydney Small was covered by New York Daily News online.

Pace’s new scholarship fund for black music pioneer Sydney Small was covered by New York Daily News online on September 16. Click on the link or read the excerpt of the text below.

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv/2010/09/16/2010-09-16_black_pioneers_legacy_to_live_on.html?r=entertainment

“A scholarship fund has been established at Pace University for the late Sydney Small, who ran WWRL (1600 AM) and was a lifelong advocate for minority voices in the mainstream media.

Small died Aug. 8 while cycling in Central Park. He was 72.

The Brooklyn native founded the National Black Network (NBN) in 1972. NBN evolved into Access 1, which owns WWRL and other radio stations.

He was a founding member of the National Association of Black Owned Broadcasters (NABOB) and a prominent spokesman for minority media ownership.

When ratings for minority stations dropped under Artbitron’s new Portable People Meter (PPM) system, he was among the station owners asking Arbitron to reassess the system.

He also helped press Madison Avenue to give minority media a greater share of advertising dollars and led NABOB’s efforts to get federal distress loans for minority broadcasters threatened by the recession.

To contribute to the Sydney L. Small scholarship fund at Pace, go to pace.edu/givenow.”

Reuters – “New York finally sees progress at Ground Zero site” – Dr. Richard Shadick

As the ninth anniversary of 9/11 approaches this Saturday, Dr. Shadick reflects on the anger and anxiety over the proposed mosque near the site of the former Twin Towers and the need for a physical memorial in a sacred where people can honor their losses. The Reuters article has been picked up by hundreds of websites worldwide including FoxBusiness.com, ABCNews.com and Yahoo.com.

As the ninth anniversary of 9/11 approaches this Saturday, Dr. Shadick reflects on the anger and anxiety over the proposed mosque near the site of the former Twin Towers and the need for a physical memorial in a sacred where people can honor their losses.  The Reuters article has been picked up by hundreds of websites worldwide including FoxBusiness.com, ABCNews.com and Yahoo.com.

“Some of the anxiety and anger over the plan for a mosque near Ground Zero is fueled by the lack of completion of the 9/11 memorial, and to some extent the fact that (al Qaeda leader Osama) bin Laden is still at large,” said Richard Shadick, director of counseling and professor of psychology at New York’s Pace University.

“A physical memorial in a sacred place where people can honor their losses, I believe, would help quell the pain experienced right now,” Shadick said.

Read the complete text online at http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSN0812292520100909

Professor Jean Coppola’s Class Featured in Investor’s Business Daily

Associate professor of computer science and information systems at Pace University in New York City was quoted in an Investor’s Business Daily article.

Read about Professor Jean Coppola’s class in Investor’s Business Daily, a national newspaper:

The great majority of Americans surf the Internet, including 70% of the 50-to-64 age group, says the Pew Research Center.

But one age demographic still lags. Only 38% of the 65-and-over crowd go online.

That can change, says Jean Coppola, associate professor of computer science and information systems at Pace University in New York City. Computer use has huge benefits for older users, she says.

“It helps them cognitively. It keeps them mentally stimulated. It’s a brain exercise,” said Coppola, who teaches “Intergenerational Computing” at the school.

http://www.investors.com/NewsAndAnalysis/Article/545351/201008271840/Granny-Can-Get-Her-Internet-Game-On.htm

Every week undergraduate students team up one-on-one with what some feel are their adopted grandparents through an intergenerational computing program.  Students’ along with seniors’ attitudes change toward each other with serendipitous strong bonds developing during this service-learning experience.

Pace professor’s film traces Kol Nidre’s origin, impact | LoHud.com | The Journal News

Allen Oren, a Dyson professor and producer of a PBS documentary on the Kol Nidre prayer, is featured in The Journal News. The film will air Sunday, September 12 at 7:00pm on Channel 13, WNET, and on other public television stations in 34 cities throughout the month including WLIW, Channel 21 at 7:00pm September 16.

Allen Oren, a Dyson professor and producer of a PBS documentary on the Kol Nidre prayer, is featured in The Journal News. The film will air Sunday, September 12 at 7:00pm on Channel 13, WNET, and on other public television stations in 34 cities throughout the month including WLIW, Channel 21 at 7:00pm September 16. The story begins on the front page of the paper and continues on page 10 with a photo of Oren with a copy of the documentary in his home in New Rochelle.

(Photo: Meagan Kanagy/The Journal News)

Pace professor’s film traces Kol Nidre’s origin, impact | LoHud.com | The Journal News.

The program was highlighted in NY1’s weekly segment “Your Weekend Starts Now,” which shows entertaining picks for great things to do each weekend around the city.

http://www.ny1.com/content/ny1_living/arts/125532/your-weekend-starts-now-9-16-10

More on “18 Voices Sing Kol Nidre” from Professor Oren below. The following was used in a pitch to media by Pace Public Information:

“A number of years ago I was leaving the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C., when my attention was wrested by a video testimonial on a large screen on the wall.  A survivor was testifying to his story.

He told of how his work detail in a Nazi labor camp was exhausted on the afternoon before Yom Kippur day, the holiest day in Judaism.  Suddenly the sky turned black, the guards allowed a weather break, and the inmates saw it as literally a heavenly sign.

First one, then another began singing the Kol Nidre, the prayer that begins the Yom Kippur observance.   Some knew the words, many hummed haltingly, but all chanted in unison.

“How,” I asked myself, “did one prayer, the Kol Nidre, become so important to one people, the Jews?”

Finding the answer led to “18 Voices Sing Kol Nidre,” a documentary and DVD I recently completed that’s scheduled for broadcast in New York as a pledge piece on WNET’s THIRTEEN on September 12 at 7 p.m. and on WLIW21 on September 16 at 7 p.m.

It will also air this High Holiday season in more than 34 other cities across the country, including Los Angeles, San Francisco, Boston, Washington, Baltimore, Miami, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Detroit, Kansas City, and Denver.

How did the Kol Nidre become a Jewish anthem and, as it turned out, an object of intense interest for non-Jews as well?  How did a prayer that doesn’t even mention God overcome centuries of persecution and save itself with a haunting melody?

The answers arrive when 18 storytellers in the piece, most from New York City, share their tales about the prayer.  Some are top experts on the chant, some are just those who have been changed by chanting it. Each tells his or her story with the help of unique visuals and unique musical settings for the melody.

The 18 voices—18 storytellers—include a Hassidic rabbi who tells the tale of a stable boy who is illiterate and can’t read the Kol Nidre prayer, but in frustration lets his shepherd’s flute fill the synagogue with spirit.

Also, famed African-American author Julius Lester, a convert to Judaism as an adult, who recalls as a boy practicing the melody on piano “as its beauty and pain twisted together like the braids of a girl’s hair.”

And a composer demonstrates how the chant has reached beyond Jewish circles, adapted by non-Jewish musicians from Beethoven to Johnny Mathis to the Electric Prunes.

Then a film critic shows how the prayer burst onto the pop scene with the first talking film, “The Jazz Singer” in 1927, which included, among the first words heard on film, the Kol Nidre.

In short, we learn the secrets of a sacred chant from those who have been touched by it.”

Professor Oren is a full-time associate professor of Journalism at Pace and a long-time working journalist, first in print, including a stint as Entertainment Editor of USA Today, then in broadcast, recently winning an Emmy for a series on the history of Madison Square Garden and an Emmy nomination for a documentary on the topic.

Oren is a long-time student of Jewish history and religion and his late father was a rabbi in Queens for 50 years.

For more on the documentary, visit www.18voices.com.

Fresh off her Emmy Award buzz, Temple Grandin speaks at Pace University | LoHud.com | The Journal News

Temple Grandin, the subject of HBO’s biographical film “Temple Grandin,” speaks at Tuesday’s 2010 Convocation at Pace University in Pleasantville. Grandin is one of the world’s most famous autistic activists for people with autism. (Photo: Seth Harrison/The Journal News)

Fresh off her Emmy Award buzz, Temple Grandin speaks at Pace University | LoHud.com | The Journal News.

Temple Grandin, the subject of HBO’s biographical film “Temple Grandin,” speaks at Tuesday’s 2010 Convocation at Pace University in Pleasantville. Grandin is one of the world’s most famous autistic activists for people with autism. (Photo: Seth Harrison/The Journal News)

Pace Professor’s Fund-raising Efforts Appear in the New York Times

Dr. Chris Malone’s participation in an upcoming New Orleans fund-raiser is mentioned in the New York Times’ list of upcoming events.

On Aug 29th, Associate Professor of political science, Christopher Malone, Ph.D., orchestrated a New Orleans fund-raiser in Lower Manhattan to benefit those hit hardest five years ago by Hurricane Katrina. He sold his personal photographs of the devastation and all proceeds benefit the Louisiana Environmental Action Network.

The event was mentioned in the Arts section of The New York Times on Aug 26th. Read the listing here.