Pace University Experts Available to Provide Analysis as Presidential Election Unfolds

Pace experts are able to comment on the presidential election on topics such as: Youth perspectives, Race, Voting, Voting rights and vote count problems, International affairs, New York State politics, Financial crisis and the election, Gender issues and politics, News coverage of the war, Impact of media on emotions, Social networking and politics, Economic conditions and the impact of white-collar crime, Computer infatuation and the housing fallout, Terrorism, Policing, Environmental and energy policy, International Court of Justice, Immigration, Health policy, Autism and special education, Bioethics, Supreme Court nominations.

Pace University Experts Elections, 2008 Sources are listed with home or cell numbers or are available upon request. Public information contacts at end. Topics include Youth perspectives, Race, Voting, Voting rights and vote count problems, International affairs, New York State politics, Financial crisis and the election, Gender issues and politics, News coverage of the war, Impact of media on emotions, Social networking and politics, Economic conditions and the impact of white-collar crime, Computer infatuation and the housing fallout, Terrorism, Policing, Environmental and energy policy, International Court of Justice, Immigration, Health policy, Autism and special education, Bioethics, Supreme Court nominations.Youth perspective Alejandra Lopez, al60560n@pace.edu Pace University student Alejandra Lopez is featured in “New Voices Vote 2008” on The Takeaway, the new national morning news program co-produced by Public Radio International and WNYC Radio in collaboration with the BBC World Service, The New York Times and WGBH Boston. She was interviewed while attending the Republican National Convention and blogged from the convention (http://dysoncollege.blogspot.com/), and is continuing to blog for New Voices and Pace University’s Dyson College. Check her out at: http://vote2008.thetakeaway.org/2008/09/24/alejandra-from-new-york-lets-talk-about-leadership/Youth views, race, voting Christopher Malone, Ph.D., Associate professor of political science and Director of the Pforzheimer Honors College, New York City campus Cell: 347-489-1520, Work: 914-773-3428, cmalone@pace.edu Featured in the Washington Post as an innovative educator, Christopher Malone is in close touch with trends in undergraduate opinions. He is hosting an on-campus election night session in connection with his course called Road to the White House for Pace and local high school students. This summer, he traveled with students to the Democratic and Republican national conventions. Malone is quoted widely in media including the Los Angeles Times and Fox5 TV, served as a political commentator during the New York primaries for the Associated Press and 1010 WINS radio, and will do so again on election night. His students assisted the AP in tallying votes in the New York primary election and will do that again on election night. His current thoughts on the election are at http://www.dysoncollege.blogspot.com. Author of “Between Freedom and Bondage: Race and Voting Rights in the Antebellum North” (Routledge, 2007), he wrote the introductory chapter of the “Encyclopedia of Minorities in American Politics” (Oryx, 2000) and several parts of the “Encyclopedia of Third Party Practices in the United States” (M. E. Share, 2001).Race and voting rights Randolph M. McLaughlin, J.D., Professor of Law Work: 914-422-4340, Cell: 914-953-5156, rmclaughlin@law.pace.edu Randy McLaughlin began his legal career at the Center for Constitutional Rights, a civil rights/civil liberties legal organization in New York City. McLaughlin specializes in voting rights litigation. In 1991, after he filed a voting rights challenge to the election of the New Rochelle, NY City Council, the city changed its method of electing council members. On February 20, 1997, Professor McLaughlin won a landmark victory in a voting rights case against the Town of Hempstead, NY. A federal judge ruled that the town-wide method of electing the Town Council was discriminatory and ordered that the system be dismantled. In 2007, he intervened on behalf of an Hispanic political activist in a voting rights lawsuit brought by the United States Department of Justice against the Village of Port Chester, NY. On January 17, 2008, the district court issued an opinion and found that the Village’s at-large election system violated the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Professor McLaughlin teaches Civil Procedure, Labor Law, Civil Rights Law and Civil Rights Litigation and has been quoted widely in media regarding civil rights, labor law and voting rights.

Vote count problems David A. Caputo, Ph.D., President Emeritus and Professor of Political Science Cell: 917-232-2421, Home: 212-873-0481, dcaputo@pace.edu David A. Caputo, Ph.D., is a seasoned political commentator who is President Emeritus and Professor of Political Science at Pace University. He is now teaching a well-received course on the election. He predicts that in battleground states the parties will call into question registration tactics, and then call for greater observation by the Federal government at the polls, delaying the process. He believes that the legitimacy of the election could be thrown into question, and that there is a possibility that the election will be decided by the courts. He can comment on those and other insights into how votes will be cast and counted including early voting, use of provisional ballots, and the Help America Vote Act. Caputo’s work over the years in election administration provides a unique window into the problems faced by local election officials. He has been a Midwest consultant for the national election reporting service and the News Election Service. He has advised media organizations on election-night tallying, was an election-night commentator on nationwide ABC radio in 2004 and has provided election analyses for CNN Fox, WNYC radio, WCBS-TV, WABC-TV and CNN International.

International affairs, NY state politics, 9/11 Greg Julian, Ph.D., Professor and Chair of Political Science Cell: 845-942-2199, Work: 914-773-3959, gjulian@pace.edu Greg Julian is an expert on the UN, international affairs and local New York state politics. He is running for office in the 38th congressional district in Rockland County, NY. In his long career in teaching and public service, Julian has served as a New York State Democratic Committeeperson. He has been quoted widely in the media, especially on issues relating to New York politics.

Financial crisis and US Presidential election, international business Jorge Pinto, Director, Center for Global Finance Cell: 646-515-5010, Work: 212-346-1973, jpinto@pace.edu In Spanish and English, Pinto has appeared on Bloomberg Television, CNN’s Lou Dobbs Tonight, WABC-TV Eyewitness News, CNN en Español, and Univision. He has been quoted in the Associated Press, New York Times, Dow Jones Newswires, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, Investor’s Business Daily, China Daily, Houston Chronicle, Hispanic Business Magazine, El Universal (Mexico), La Opinion, Middle East magazine, and United Press International. A former Mexican consul and ambassador to Sweden, Europe and the US, and executive director of the World Bank, Pinto is an expert on global finance and the economy and teaches international business at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. He can discuss the impact of the financial crisis on the presidential election, and compare it to past elections. Pinto received his law degree from Mexico’s National University and has also studied law, economics, and political science at New York University and at the Sorbonne in France.

Gender issues in politics, women and the election Meghana Nayak, Ph.D., Assistant professor of political science Work: 212-346-1465, Mnayak@pace.edu Meghana Nayak is a political science professor who specializes in gender and politics. She recently co-authored a study guide for a documentary film on women and the 2008 presidential election with Pace professor Sid Ray. She has published articles in many top journals on gender and politics and recently co-edited a book, “International Relations from the Margins.” Her courses and expertise include international law and human rights, gender and politics, international politics and economic organizations, social movements, and U.S. state identity.

News coverage of the war and politics, impact of media on emotions and the election Michelle M. Pulaski Behling, Ph.D., Assistant professor of communications Home: 203-778-8064, Cell: 203-994-0452, Work: 914-773-3529, mpulaskibehling@pace.edu Michelle Pulaski Behling is assistant professor of media and communication arts. She teaches media and politics, media ethics, professional communication, public speaking, television and radio communications, and censorship and mass media. Dr Pulaski Behling’s research focuses on the impact of the news media on the emotions of the viewing public, including media coverage of the war. She has been quoted several times in media including the Journal News in Westchester.

Social networking and the election Catherine Dwyer, Ph.D., Lecturer in Information Systems Work: 212-346-1728, cdwyer@pace.edu In Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, Catherine Dwyer has extensively studied use of social networking sites and can comment on social networking as a promotional tool in the election. The headline on a write-up of her work in Computerworld said “Facebook, MySpace Users will Swap Privacy for Goodies,” and the story ran in media throughout the world.

Economic crisis Richard E. Ottoo, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Finance Work: 212-618-6526, Home office: 212-694-1056, rottoo@pace.edu Richard Ottoo is assistant professor of finance in the Lubin School of Business. He teaches managerial and corporate finance, mergers and acquisitions, investment analysis, financial analysis and policy and international finance. Research interests include valuation, real options, risk management and emerging markets finance. He has recently been featured on WABC-TV in an on-air interview about the government bailout and has been quoted in articles online offering tips for dealing with the current economic situation.

Economic crisis Aron Gottesman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Finance and Economics Work: 212-618-6525, agottesman@pace.edu Aron Gottesman is an associate professor in the Lubin School of Business. His expertise includes financial markets, financial intermediation, and mutual funds. Published articles in academic journals include the Journal of Banking and Finance, Journal of Empirical Finance, Journal of Financial Markets, and the Journal of Financial Services Research, among others. He has co-authored several books. His research has been cited and reviewed in newspapers and popular magazines, including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Forbes Magazine, and Business Week. He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses on managerial finance, investment analysis and capital markets, presents corporate seminars on finance topics, and is consultant to both firms and governments.

Housing market fallout James W. Gabberty, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Information Systems and Faculty Fellow, Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship Work: 212-346-1008, Cell: 516-446-8019, jgabberty@pace.edu James Gabberty has long predicted that infatuation with computerized data processing would lead to widespread mistakes in evaluating deals in the housing market. His research interests include technology strategy and innovation, firm competitiveness, international trade, knowledge management, e-commerce, e-government, international marketing, and globalization.

Terrorism, policing and security Joseph Ryan, Ph.D., Professor and chair of criminal justice Cell: 914-924-3191, Work: 914-773-3814, jryan@pace.edu Joseph Ryan is professor and chair of the Department of Criminal Justice and Sociology and a national expert on community policing, terrorism, police management related issues. He is currently conducting an impact evaluation of a master’s degree in homeland security and an Executive Leaders Program offered at the Naval Postgraduate School’s Center for Homeland Defense and Security. A 25-year veteran of the New York City Police Department, from 1993 to 1996 he chaired an advisory group for the U.S. Department of Justice that developed security strategies for the 1996 summer Olympics. He produced a landmark evaluation of federal legislation that encouraged the hiring of the 100,000 community police officers and testified before a US Congressional sub committee about the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s need to develop risk management and outcome-based performance measurement strategies. He has been quoted in newspapers throughout the US.

National security, terrorism, White Collar Crime and the economic crisis, church and state Ralph Michael Stein, J.D., Professor of law Cell: 914-649-6613 (preferred contact number), Work: 914-422-4242, rstein@law.pace.edu Ralph Stein has been teaching national security law for 20 years and is an expert on surveillance of civilians and the separation of church and state. Having served in military intelligence at the national command level, he recently authored “Artillery Lends Dignity to What Otherwise Would Be a Common Brawl: An Essay on Post-Modern Warfare and the Classification of Captured Adversaries” (2002). He serves on the board of the Lower Hudson Valley chapter of the New York Civil Liberties Union and is involved in civil liberties activities in both New York City and Westchester County. He speaks frequently to citizen and community groups and regularly comments for local and national media.

Energy policy, renewable energy, conservation James M. Van Nostrand, J.D., Executive Director of the Energy and Climate Center Work: 914-422-4082, Cell: 914-830-8055, jvannostrand@law.pace.edu Jamie Van Nostrand became Executive Director of the Energy and Climate Center in spring 2008 following a career in private practice as a partner in the Environmental and Natural Resources practice group in a large Northwest-based law firm, Perkins Coie LLP. In his 22-year career in private practice, Van Nostrand represented energy clients in state regulatory proceedings in eight western states, as well as proceedings before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. His practice emphasized electricity and gas regulation, utility mergers and acquisitions, telecommunications, and administrative law. Van Nostrand represented electric, natural gas and combination utilities in dozens of general rate cases, and developed a specialized practice in the state regulatory approval of mergers and acquisitions, having handled several multi-state merger approvals in both the energy and telecommunications industries. From his years in private practice, Mr. Van Nostrand has experience in all aspects of the regulatory process affecting electric and natural gas utilities, including resource acquisition, renewable energy, and the design and implementation of energy efficiency and conservation programs. Van Nostrand was recognized by the Energy Bar Association as its 2007 State Regulatory Practitioner of the Year, and has been included for the last several years (including 2008) of The Best Lawyers in America.

Environmental policy David N. Cassuto, J.D., Ph.D., Professor of Law Work: 914-422-4456, Cell: 518-929-2520, Home: 518-392-2318, dcassuto@law.pace.edu A former professor of English specializing in literature and the environment, Professor Cassuto has published and lectured widely on legal, literary, and environmental issues. He is also a frequent speaker on legal and cultural studies. Professor Cassuto teaches in the areas of property, professional responsibility, animal law, water law, international comparative law, and legal and environmental theory.

Foreign relations, war crimes, international disputes, international court of justice Alexander K.A. Greenawalt, J.D., Associate Professor of Law Work: 914-422-4092, agreenawalt@law.pace.edu If under a new administration the US agrees to participate in a new international court of justice at The Hague, Greenawalt will be a sought after expert. Alexander (Sasha) Greenawalt is an expert in international law, specifically war crimes tribunals, the International Criminal Court, and international disputes. Trained in history at Princeton and Yale and in law at Columbia, he has worked at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and for human rights organizations in Bosnia, speaks Serbo-Croatian, and has written on related issues for the Columbia Law Review and the NYU Journal of International Politics. He joined the Pace faculty from the firm of Debevoise & Plimpton LLP, where his practice focused on international disputes. At Pace, Professor Greenawalt teaches U.S. Foreign Relations Law, International Law, and Administrative Law. Greenawalt joined the Pace faculty in 2006 from the firm of Debevoise & Plimpton LLP where his practice focused on international disputes. He was a teaching fellow at Columbia Law School in 2005 and was previously a clerk for the Honorable Stephen F. Williams of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit (2000-01). He was quoted in the LA Times and elsewhere after Radovan Karadzic was extradited to the war crimes tribunal at The Hague.

Immigration justice, domestic violence, women’s health issues, medical ethics Vanessa Merton, J.D., Professor of Law and Faculty Supervisor of the Immigration Justice Clinic; Work: 914-422-4333, vmerton@law.pace.edu Vanessa Merton is a professor of law and faculty supervisor of the Immigration Justice Clinic at Pace Law School. She developed the Prosecution of Domestic Violence Clinic in conjunction with the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office. She has lectured and published extensively on issues of biomedical and legal ethics and on health issues of importance to women, including domestic violence, the exclusion of women subjects from medical research, and the phenomenon of female genital mutilation. She is founding chair of the Institutional Review Board of the Community Research Initiative of New York, one of the first centers for community-based biomedical research on AIDS, and the first Associate for Law at the Hastings Center Institute for Society, Ethics, and the Life Sciences. She received six national and state public interest practice awards for creating a disaster legal assistance program for victims of the September 11 terrorist attacks and for her unwavering dedication to public service. She has appeared several times in regional media for her expertise regarding immigration justice.

International human rights, racial and ethnic profiling, death penalty Thomas McDonnell, J.D., Professor of Law, Faculty Chairperson of the Criminal Law/Legal Writing Program Work: 914-422-4381, Cell: 914-489-0406, tmcdonnell@law.pace.edu Thomas McDonnell’s expertise in international human rights law covers a range of vital global issues including racial and ethnic profiling, kidnapping and renditions, and the death penalty. His articles on lawyering, legal research, and international human rights law have appeared in numerous publications including the National Law Journal and the Journal of Legal Education.

Special education Dianne Zager, Ph.D., Michael C. Koffler Professor in Autism, School of Education Work: 212-346-1885 or 212-346-1746, dzager@pace.edu Dianne Zager directs the Center for Teaching and Research in Autism (TARA) and the TARA Advanced Certification Program. She also coordinates the Special Education Teacher Preparation Program at Pace University’s NYC campus. Zager is a pioneer in the field of autism and has lectured across the United States in the areas of autism and developmental disabilities. A nationally recognized leader in the field of special education, Zager co-founded the journal Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities. The third edition of her edited textbook, Autism Spectrum Disorders: Identification, Education and Treatment was published in 2005. She has served as president of the Northeastern Educational Research Association and the New York State Federation of Chapters of the Council for Exceptional Children. She has been quoted widely in media regarding autism, including a recent feature on the autism inclusion class on WNBC-TV.

Supreme Court nominations, government ethics, white collar crime Bennett L. Gershman, J.D., James D. Hopkins Chair and Professor of Law Work: 914-422-4255, Home: 914-946-7958, bgershman@law.pace.edu Bennett Gershman is a leading expert on white collar crime. The author of numerous articles as well as two books on prosecutorial and judicial ethics, he is a former prosecutor with the Manhattan District Attorney’s office and served for four years with the Special New York State Prosecutor investigating corruption in the judicial system. He received his J.D. from New York University and his B.A. from Princeton University. Bennett L. Gershman is a leading authority on courtroom and government ethics.

Pace University Public Information Office: Christopher T. Cory, Executive Director Work: 212-346-1117, Cell: 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

Cara Halstead Cea, Public Information Officer Work: 914-733-3312, Cell: 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu

William Caldwell, Public Information Officer Work: 212- 346-1597, Cell: 347-242-9342, wcaldwell@pace.edu

Caputo Warns of Looming Vote-Counting Issues in Presidential Election That Could Delay Results

With voter registration tactics (of ACORN) a hot topic in the presidential debate and MoveOn crying “voter suppression” in an email today, political scientist David A. Caputo predicts vote-counting issues.

LOOMING VOTE-COUNTING PROBLEMS COULD DELAY RESULTS, TRIGGER COURTS Expert Advisory

In battleground states “the parties will certainly call into question registration tactics, and then call for greater observation by the Federal government at the polls. This could tie the process up.”

“The legitimacy of the election could be thrown into question, and there’s also the possibility it will be decided by the courts.”

With voter registration tactics (of ACORN) a hot topic in the presidential debate and MoveOn crying “voter suppression” in an email today, the insights above and below from political scientist David A. Caputo are particularly relevant. Caputo, a Yale PhD, is a seasoned political commentator who is President Emeritus and Professor of Political Science at Pace University and is now teaching a well-received course on the election.

Caputo adds: “Some fascinating things are coming up. In states like Ohio and others where there will be extensive purging of registered voters, the possibility exists that counting provisional ballots could delay the final count for days. Coupled with the registration snafus, poor planning and other usual events which cause problems, there is the possibility that the legitimacy of the election could be thrown into question and also the possibility it will be decided by the courts, not the electorate. Shades of Florida 2000! I don’t think the supporters of either candidate will accept a repeat of this. We could be headed for very difficult set of decisions.”

“Most Americans are unaware of what is happening now regarding early voting, use of provisional ballots, and the importance of the Help America Vote Act.”

Caputo’s work over the years in election administration provides a unique window into the problems faced by local election officials.

• He is a resolutely nonpartisan observer of the relationships between municipal, state and federal governments that are crucial to voting procedures. • He has been a Midwest consultant for the national election reporting service and the News Election Service. He has advised media organizations on election-night tallying, was an election-night commentator on nationwide ABC radio in 2004 and has provided brief election analyses for Fox, WNYC radio, WCBS-TV, WABC-TV and CNN International. • He edited a special issue of National Civic Review on civic engagement by college students. • He was instrumental in making Pace the location for the only debate among all ten Democratic presidential candidates in fall, 2004 and for the debates among New York statewide candidates in summer, 2006.

Preferred telephone: 212-541-5551. Cell: 917-232-2421 dcaputo@pace.edu Media contact: Cara Halstead, Public Information, Pace University O: 914-773-3312, Cell: 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu

News source: Collapse of Bear Stearns and layoffs, downsizing in financial services industry

Barry Miller, Ph.D., manager of alumni career programs and services at Pace University in New York and a private career consultant, has been seeing people from Bear Stearns and other financial services firms for several months. He can offer advice on how to survive and thrive after downsizing and layoffs in financial services and other industries.

March 21, 2008

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

NEWS SOURCE

Topic: Collapse of Bear Stearns and layoffs, downsizing in financial services industry

Barry Miller, Ph.D., manager of alumni career programs and services at Pace University in New York and a private career consultant, has been seeing people from Bear Stearns and other financial services firms for several months. He can offer advice on how to survive and thrive after downsizing and layoffs in financial services and other industries.

“The collapse of Bear Stearns is no shock,” says Miller. “There will be many more layoffs to come.

“Still, as of today there are an abundance of jobs out there. They are posted but not on the web sites that most people are familiar with.

“Networking is the antidote to the threat of downsizing. Most people do not know how to do it effectively. They don’t know how to use on-line networking sites like LinkedIn and Facebook properly. The sites are both different and have their uses. It isn’t ‘either or.’

“For some people, this may be an opportunity to retool their skills.”

At Pace, Miller counsels students and alumni and conducts workshops on Networking Strategies, Self Assessment, and Interviewing Skills.

Miller is a faculty advisor for Women in Corporate America, an organization that offers mentoring and networking opportunities for female students, connecting them with women in corporate America who want to share their work experiences.

Prior to coming to Pace, Miller was an outplacement consultant assisting executives, managers and professionals on their job search. Miller has fourteen years of experience in the corporate world including seven years with Becton Dickinson, a leading health care products manufacturing organization.

Miller holds a Ph.D. in Human Development from New York University, has written many professional articles, and has been quoted on job search and management, appearing in National Business Employment Weekly, Fortune, Associated Press, Management Review, Time, U.S. News & World Report, New York Times, Cosmopolitan, More, Working Mother, Working Woman, and Smart Money. He has appeared on NBC News and Fox News.

Phone: (212) 346-1540; email bmiller@pace.edu .

Spitzer Situation Experts

Pace University offers several experts on the Spitzer resignation. All should be called direct. (In case of difficulty, call PR contacts listed below). Pace faculty members watch New York politics from campuses one block from New York City Hall and in White Plains and Pleasantville in suburban Westchester County.

SPITZER SITUATION EXPERTS

Pace University offers the following experts on the Spitzer resignation. All should be called direct. (In case of difficulty, call PR contacts listed below). Pace faculty members watch New York politics from campuses one block from New York City Hall and in White Plains and Pleasantville in suburban Westchester County.

Christopher Malone, PhD, Associate Professor of Political Science (Implications of Spitzer’s forthcoming departure on the Democratic Party and on national politics as well as the issue of race regarding Spitzer’s replacement.)

Chris Malone is active in New York City politics, organizing and managing campaigns, and helped create the South Brooklyn Democratic Alliance. He recently published “Between Freedom and Bondage: Race and Voting Rights in the Antebellum North” (Taylor and Francis); he authored the introductory chapter to the “Encyclopedia of Minorities in American Politics” (Oryx, 2000) and several parts of the “Encyclopedia of Third Party Practices in the United States” (M. E. Share, 2001). Courses taught include American Politics, Political Theory
Education: PhD, Political Science, CUNY Graduate Center; MA, Fordham University; BS, Louisiana State University.
Contact information: Phone: (212) 346-1146; E-mail: cmalone@pace.edu
Personal Web Page: http://webpage.pace.edu/cmalone/

Meghana Nayak, PhD, Assistant Professor, Political Science (Implications for women’s roles).

Professor Nayak is the acting chair of the political science department at Pace. Her professional focus is on nationalism, social movements, international law and human rights, and U.S. state identity, among other topics. Publications include “Special Issue: Gender Violence and Hegemonic Projects,” co-editor with Jennifer Suchland (International Feminist Journal of Politics 2006). Courses taught include International Relations, Model United Nations, Advanced International Relations, International Law and Human Rights, Gender and Politics, International Politics and Economic Organizations, Comparative Racial and Gender Politics of South Africa and the U.S. with Professor Malone.
Education: PhD, Political Science, minor Feminist Studies, University of Minnesota
BA with Honors Psychology/Women’s Studies, Southwestern University.
Contact information: Office (212) 346-1465; mnayak@pace.edu

Jay C. Carlisle, JD, Professor of Law (Potential consequences of Spitzer’s actions on his license to practice law. If Spitzer is considered unfit to remain in office but still fit to practice law, what does that say about the profession?)

Professor Carlisle’s areas of interest include government ethics and professional responsibility. Governor Mario Cuomo appointed Carlisle Chairperson of the Temporary State Commission on Local Government Ethics Public Advisory Council. He has published extensively in the area of civil litigation, procedure and professional responsibility. He also was appointed by the Chief Judge of New York to the Task Force on Women and the Courts. Since 1999 Carlisle has served as a referee for the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct. He has taught courses in Civil Procedure, Criminal Procedure, Negotiations, Professional Responsibility, Civil Litigation in New York, Dispute Resolution, Remedies, Civil Rights Law and the Legal Profession. He lectures for the Practicing Law Institute, the New York State Trial Lawyers Institute, the Office of Court Administration, and the New York State Judicial Institute. Education: AB, University of California at Los Angeles, JD, University of California at Davis.
Contact information: Office (914) 422-4234, Cell (914) 316-1560, jcarlisle@law.pace.edu.

Bennett L. Gershman, JD, Professor of Law (criminal defense, prosecutorial and judicial ethics)

In private practice, Gershman specialized in criminal defense litigation. A former prosecutor with the Manhattan District Attorney’s office for six years, he is the author of numerous articles as well as two books on prosecutorial and judicial ethics. He served for four years with the Special State Prosecutor investigating corruption in the judicial system. He is one of the nation’s leading experts on prosecutorial misconduct. He teaches Constitutional Law, Evidence, Criminal Procedure and Criminal Justice, and has taught in the London Law Program.
Contact information: Office (914) 422-4255 or bgershman@law.pace.edu

Ralph M. Stein, JD, Professor of Law (Surveillance, civil liberties, constitutional and criminal law).

Stein has published law review articles on constitutional law and criminal law, is on the legal committee of the Anti-Defamation League, has been involved in various civil liberties activities in both New York and Westchester, and frequently speaks to and aids citizen and community groups. He is a co-author of Comparative Negligence. He is currently examining recent developments in state constitutional law and first amendment law, the latter particularly with reference to separation of church and state. He played a significant role in uncovering military surveillance of civilian political activity in the early ’70s. He served for two years as a field investigator for the U.S. Senate Sub-Committee on Constitutional Rights and was an associate with Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher, & Flom. Education: B.A., New School for Social Research; J.D., Hofstra University.
Contact information: Cell (914) 649-6613, rstein@law.pace.edu

Public relations contacts:
Cara Halstead Cea (914) 906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu
Tom Schuyler (212) 481-7000, toms@mbooth.com

News source: Debate on advertising’s role in obesity, health and wellness

Paul Kurnit, clinical professor of marketing at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York, has forceful views and diverse experience in the youth marketplace.

October 30, 2007

Contact Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

NEWS SOURCE

Topic: Debate on advertising’s role in obesity, health and wellness

Debates are raging about the role of advertising in obesity, age appropriate messaging and over commercialization of youth.

For example, Senators Sam Brownback and Tom Harkin, along with FCC Chairman Kevin Martin and FCC Commissioners Michael J. Copps and Deborah Taylor Tate, announced the formation of a Task Force on Media and Childhood Obesity to examine the impact of media and advertising on children’s health. According to an article on Broadcasting & Cable online, 9/19/2007, the report from the task force has been “apparently held up by the inability to get children’s activist groups to sign off on it.” http://www.broadcastingcable.com/article/CA6479807.html?rssid=193

Paul Kurnit, clinical professor of marketing at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York, has forceful views and diverse experience in the youth marketplace. As a senior executive in the advertising business as President of Griffin Bacal, a DDB agency, he helped build the Hasbro toy and entertainment business and supervised TV programs like Transformers, GI Joe and My Little Pony. In addition to teaching at Pace, he operates his own marketing and consulting businesses, Kurnit Communications and KidShop. He also has worked extensively on “pro-social” initiatives to help young people including youth volunteerism for America’s Promise, founded by Colin Powell, The Partnership for a Drug-Free America, and the Charles and Helen Schwab Foundation’s programs for students with learning difficulties. He serves on the Creative Review Committee of The Advertising Council, the board of directors of the Advertising Educational Foundation and the advisory board of the Children’s Advertising Review Unit.

Professor Kurnit’s views on the role of advertising in obesity:

“Many who criticize advertising to kids misplace blame and oversimplify complex societal issues requiring much more comprehensive solutions to foster youth health and well-being. There has been no link demonstrated between advertising and obesity. Advertising plays a positive role in socializing kids. And, advertising is an important engine for quality entertainment and communication that nurture and nourish kids.”

Contrary to what anti-marketing groups maintain, “I haven’t seen any conclusive data that show kids are damaged by advertising. We live in a commercial world. The issue is to make advertising as responsive and responsible as possible rather than to turn our back on the commercial world we live in. The big opportunity is to harness the power of advertising to encourage positive social movements that will support a future of healthier kids and families.”

Phone: (914) 737-0300; email: pkurnit@pace.edu .

Market Uncertainties Unlikely to Hurt Economy of Downtown Manhattan, Says Developer of Pace Index

Job cuts at large Wall Street firms do not mean the economy of downtown Manhattan is headed for a fall.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts:

Farrokh Hormozi, Ph.D., Pace University, 914-422-4285, cell 646-644-2367, fhormozi@pace.edu

Tom Schuyler, M. Booth & Associates, 212-539-3223, cell 646-344-9427, toms@mbooth.com

MARKET UNCERTAINTIES UNLIKELY TO HURT

ECONOMY OF DOWNTOWN MANHATTAN,

SAYS DEVELOPER OF PACE UNIVERSITY INDEX

Disputing gloom, economist finds “slight dip” in recent data an “aberration.”

New York, NY, October 23, 2007—Job cuts at large Wall Street firms do not mean the economy of downtown Manhattan is headed for a fall.

That bullish forecast is based on the latest Pace Downtown Index (PDI), a composite of weighted economic indicators for the area south of Canal Street developed by Pace University three years ago. The Index has regularly come up with findings that are supported several months later by data from federal and local agencies.

The third quarter PDI was fractionally down from the second quarter – by 0.05 points, to 106.27. However it was still higher than its first quarter value of 106.21.

Moreover, “looking at the long-term trend line, at this point we may consider the reversal an aberration which will soon pass,” writes Farrokh Hormozi, Ph.D., the Pace economist who supervises the index, in the latest report on the data page.cfm?doc_id=10618.

The reason is real estate, Hormozi says. “So far, the Lower Manhattan economy has been relatively immune to the bursting of the real estate bubble and is largely unaffected by the sub-prime default problem: an area where the average weekly income is over $8,000 cannot be the target of loan-sharks and teaser rates.”

The “slight dip” “shows resilience in the face of harsh problems facing the financial markets,” Hormozi writes. Despite the dip, the third quarter economy of lower Manhattan grew “better than the economies of both the City of New York and the country as a whole.”

Hormozi adds that those who now see gloom ahead include many who thought Downtown would never recover from 9/11.

The PDI’s statistical weightings gauge the relative influence on the downtown economy of not just the financial markets and the overall Gross City Product, but also of changes in the total commercial real estate vacancy rate. The raw real estate data is supplied by Cushman & Wakefield.

The PDI report will be available before 2pm by contacting Tom Schuyler to request a copy be sent, after 2pm it will be available online at /emplibrary/ACFB4A.pdf.

Expert source on Petraeus report favors tactical redeployment to Kuwait, Qatar and Bahrain

Pace University expert foresees “large wave of democracy” in Middle East in next 10 to 15 years

NEWS SOURCE

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

August 21, 2007

Topic: General Petraeus’s September status report
to Congress on Iraq policy

Pace University expert foresees “large wave of democracy” in Middle East in next 10 to 15 years

Michael Izady, PhD, history professor at Pace University in New York, is an expert on the Middle East who helps train and brief Special Forces troops and others in the U.S. military here and overseas on ethnic and social issues. In the past year, he has seen the training of the Iraqi police and military first-hand.

Izady’s views on Iraq’s police and security forces, likely intervention by neighbors, long-term U.S. presence, and counter-terrorism:

• The Iraqi army, police and security forces “are ineffective because they have been trained like a Western army: to use violence as the last and not the first resort. In a non-civil society where people have been treated as subjects and not citizens for generations, such a civility on the part of the law enforcement authorities leads invariably to vast increase in violence, political and criminal. We are creating a very respectable and respectful Western-style police and military because we intend to bring democracy. It is not the killing machine that Iraq used to have. But the population is used to that killing machine.”

• There will be no overt intervention in Iraq by its neighbors once the U.S. leaves the country. “The United States will still be in the Middle East and the Persian Gulf, and the neighboring countries are well aware of the power the U.S. can wield if need be. Iraq’s neighbors will intervene covertly, however, but except for some border crossing by the Turks to punish the Kurds, there will be no invasion of Iraq or open interference in that country by the neighboring states. U.S. troops can safely be withdrawn to new positions ‘just over the horizon’ in Kuwait, Qatar or Bahrain and still maintain a protective role for the fledgling democratic government of Iraq. This can easily protect Iraq from its neighbors, and to a great degree, the Iraqi people from the emergence of another dictatorial government in Baghdad itself.”

• The U.S. leaving the country completely and unsupervised would “probably create a dictatorship of the Shia majority in Iraq and the strong possibility of a breakup of the Iraqi state along its ethnic seams. Conversely, a tactical redeployment to ‘just over the horizon’ and the maintenance of close surveillance of the Iraqi political elite and affairs can largely achieve the domestic American demand for a withdrawal without chancing throwing the baby out with the bathwater. The British awarded Iraq its independence in 1932, then withdrew to Habbania— a one-hour drive west of Baghdad, i.e., just over the horizon in those days — where they kept an eagle eye on the government they had helped to create. It worked well until 1958 when the British lost that ability. The country immediately saw a military takeover and the end of its fledgling democracy. We should learn much from this.”

In an online chat with USATODAY.com in 2004, Izady said “Iraq should be administered as Germany, Japan and Italy have been since 1945, i.e., America has remained on their soil despite the fact that independent democratic governments were formed and are functioning in those countries. There has never been a complete and total American withdrawal from Germany, Japan or Italy.” http://cgi1.usatoday.com/mchat/20040210004/tscript.htm

• In the next 10 to 15 years, we will see a “large wave of democracy” in the Middle East. “The United States is committed to a long-term policy of bringing democracy and free markets to the planet piece-by-piece, portion by portion. We have no choice. Either everybody will have more social justice and affluence, or we will continue to live a life of terror for the foreseeable future. The global village can no longer sustain a barricaded and peaceful rich within a sea of poverty and turmoil. Only the United States has the human, political, military and economic resources to achieve this. Left to its own devices, the world gets worse through small and big wars, genocides, starvation and environmental degradation. It would have been great if the UN had the instrument or the unity to do these. But, at present and in the foreseeable future, it is the U.S. that has this ability and in fact responsibility to nudge the world toward a more equitable and prosperous future.”

Izady is the author of books including The Kurds: A Concise Handbook (1992); The Sharafnâma (2005), and Yazdanism: Mystery Religions and Mythology of the Zagrotian Peoples (1997). He is the author of five field guidebooks on Iraq, Afghanistan, the Balkans, the Levant, and Islam & Insurgency used by members of the U.S. Armed Forces deployed overseas. He received his college education in the U.S., finishing his doctorate in Middle Eastern Studies at Columbia University in 1992. He has taught at Harvard, the Smithsonian Institution, Uppsala University in Sweden, the Free University of Berlin, and Pace University (2001-present).

Izady has appeared on National Public Radio, PBS, ABC Nightline, Fox, Discovery Channel, and History Channel.

Izady travels frequently and is not always available. Media should try reaching him at izadym@yahoo.com and 212-362-6188. See website, www.pace.edu .

dditional Funding Not the Sole Answer for Urban Schools, says Pace Professor and Author

More funding for urban schools is only half the way to fix them, according to Barry A. Gold, PhD., an expert on organizational change who is Associate Professor of Management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business and author of a just-published study of recent school finance changes in New Jersey, Still Separate And Unequal: Segregation And The Future Of Urban School Reform (Teachers College Press, 2007).

Contact: Cara Halstead Cea, Pace University Public Information, 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu, or Barry Allen Gold, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Management, Lubin School of Business, Pace University, bgold@pace.edu

Pace University Management Professor available for comment on Increased New York City School Funding

Additional Funding Not the Sole Answer for Urban Schools, says Author of New Book

New research, also weighing No Child Left Behind, supports planned diversity, tactic at issue in US Supreme Court case to be decided this spring

More funding for urban schools is only half the way to fix them, according to Barry A. Gold, PhD., an expert on organizational change who is Associate Professor of Management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business and author of a just-published study of recent school finance changes in New Jersey, Still Separate And Unequal: Segregation And The Future Of Urban School Reform (Teachers College Press, 2007).

Gold’s research shows that to improve educational opportunity for urban students, teachers need to teach them the same way suburban students are taught. Moreover, some form of integration is necessary.

Gold documents and analyzes the implementation of the first four years of the landmark 1998 New Jersey Supreme Court Abbott V ruling and the first three years of the 2002 federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) act. In four high-poverty, low-achievement urban elementary schools in New Jersey, these unprecedented reforms proposed to change all elements of the schools except their population characteristics — two were African American and two were Latino. Hence a related but more important research question was: Can separate education be equal? According to Gold, the answer is still no.

Gold found that teaching and learning did not improve and, in many cases, became less effective. This was primarily because administrators and teachers rejected the reforms or modified them to fit their idea of appropriate education for urban students, which as they understand it is different than the kind that suits suburban students. By focusing on test scores, in a powerful example of an unintended consequence NCLB actually increased the use of ineffective teaching methods—rote drill and obsessive reiteration of “the basics”—that often are used in the urban education that the Abbott V mandates tried to change.

According to Gold, the lingering socio-cultural ecology of segregation, which Abbott V and NCLB did not try to alter, insidiously reproduced the less effective kind of urban education.

In June 2007, the United States Supreme Court will rule on the use of planned diversity to achieve racial balance in public schools. The January 8, 2007 edition of the NPR program “Justice Talking” <http://www.justicetalking.com/viewprogram.asp?progID=580> is an excellent debate on the complex issues. Still Separate and Unequal: Segregation and the Future of Urban School Reform supports planned diversity to improve equality of educational opportunity, particularly under the conditions of extreme segregation that characteristic of most metropolitan regions in the United States.

Cuba, Castro expert

Professor Dan Greenberg, director of the Latin American Studies program at Pace University in New York, is available to comment on Cuba and Fidel Castro. Greenberg , a Latin American historian, has been at Pace for 16 years and regularly teaches Cuban history. He has been to the country twice and knows Fidel Castro’s older brother. (Castro’s younger brother, Raul, is the country’s acting president.). Reach Greenberg at 212-346-1086 or dgreenberg@pace.edu.

Contact: Pace University’s Office of Public Information: Bill Caldwell, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu or Cara Halstead Cea, 914-773-3312, chalstead@pace.edu

August 31, 2006

NEWS SOURCE

CUBA, FIDEL CASTRO

Professor Dan Greenberg, director of the Latin American Studies program at Pace University in New York, is available to comment on Cuba and Fidel Castro. Greenberg , a Latin American historian, has been at Pace for 16 years and regularly teaches Cuban history. He has been to the country twice and knows Fidel Castro’s older brother. (Castro’s younger brother, Raul, is the country’s acting president.). Reach Greenberg at 212-346-1086 or dgreenberg@pace.edu.

Celebrating its 100th anniversary in 2006, Pace University educates achievers who are engaged with critical issues both locally and globally. Known for an outcome-oriented environment that prepares students to succeed in a wide-range of professions, Pace has three campuses, including New York City (downtown and Midtown), Westchester (Pleasantville, Briarcliff, and the White Plains Graduate Center), and the Pace School of Law in White Plains. A private metropolitan university, Pace enrolls approximately 14,000 students in undergraduate, masters, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Ivan G. Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, Law School, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, and School of Education. www.pace.edu.

Pace experts available to discuss issues surrounding Hurricane Katrina and disaster recovery

Pace University has experts, including a New Orleans native, who can discuss issues surrounding catastrophes, including economic and political repercussions and post traumatic stress.

September 1, 2005

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University , 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY: Hurricane Katrina and Disaster Recovery

Pace University has experts, including a New Orleans native, who can discuss issues surrounding catastrophes, including economic and political repercussions and post traumatic stress.

Economic, Political Repercussions of Natural Disaster

Dr. Robert H. Parks, an economist and professor of finance at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in
New York City, was born in New Orleans and lived there for several years. He currently heads up his own firm counseling institutional investment officers and corporate comptrollers. He has served as chief economist for duPont Glore Forgan, Blyth Eastman Dillon, and Advest Institutional Services. He also has industrial and financial forecasting experience as an economist with General Electric.

Parks can discuss the economic and political repercussions of the hurricane disaster in New Orleans, including its effect on gas and oil prices, and how the federal sector is at fault for its inadequate preparations for dealing with a catastrophe of this scale.

Home phone: 914-923-6117; email drrhparks@optonline.net.

Trauma, Disasters, Counseling and Supervision

Dr. Richard Shadick is director of Pace University’s Counseling Center . Shadick is director of the Trauma Response Service of the White Institute and a member of the New York State Disaster Response Network. He frequently presents at conferences on issues related to 9/11, suicide, trauma, and complicated bereavement; actively engages in editorial work on a number of psychology journals; and has a private practice in lower Manhattan .

Shadick was involved in a study developing a new treatment to counsel those who are grieving the loss of a loved one from 9/11; was a lead trainer for the Mental Health Association’s grant to train 5,000 mental health professionals to respond to future terrorist attacks; has counseled Ground Zero workers; and worked clinically with survivors of 9/11.

Shadick can discuss post traumatic stress association with natural disasters. Office phone: 212-346-1527, home phone: 212-879-6845, email: rshadick@pace.edu .

Forensic Science

Brian Gestring is an Associate Professor of Chemistry and Physical Sciences and is also the Director of the Bachelors and Masters Programs in Forensic Science at Pace University . Prior to coming to Pace, Professor Gestring has worked as a death investigator, and as supervisory criminalist: in the World Trade Center Identification Unit; a DNA Laboratory; and a crime scene reconstruction unit. Professor Gestring has also served as a technical consultant for two prime time network television shows and still remains active as a forensic consultant.

Office phone: (212) 346-1967, email bgestring@pace.edu .

Additionally, Pace University will assemble a large number of experts in post-traumatic stress and counseling at two separate events taking place next week, as follows:

Friday, September 9, from 1-5 p.m. , at the
Michael
Schimmel Center for the Arts (downtown campus across the street from City Hall) – The editors and authors of On the Ground after September 11: Mental Health Responses and Practical Knowledge Gained will present distilled lessons they have learned during the four years since 9/11. Presentations will include clinical considerations encountered in traumatic events. For more information, contact: 212-737-8524 or
yael@aol.com

Saturday, September 10, from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. , at the Pace
University downtown campus – Pace will co-host Breaking the Cycle of Violence… Healing, Restoring and Rebuilding Ourselves and Our Communities. The full day event with talks and workshops is designed to help people deal with trauma and stress. For more information contact: Richard Raskin, Pace University Counseling Center , 212-346-1523.

A private university in the New York Metropolitan area, Pace has a growing national reputation for offering students opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. Approximately 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School.
www.pace.edu