401kWire: “A Pace Prof. Argues That It’s All About the 401k Advisor”

. . . “The [Schwab 2013 401(k) Participant Survey] is ostensibly about 401(k)s, but really I think it’s about asset allocation,” says Aron Gottesman, a professor of finance and chairperson of the Finance and Economics Department at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. “Your typical individual is faced with a menu of funds in which to invest and they are unsure how to do so appropriately. The whole thing is highly confusing.”

. . . “The [Schwab 2013 401(k) Participant Survey] is ostensibly about 401(k)s, but really I think it’s about asset allocation,”  says Aron Gottesman, a professor of finance and chairperson of the Finance and Economics Department at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. “Your typical individual is faced with a menu of funds in which to invest and they are unsure how to do so appropriately. The whole thing is highly confusing.”

The source of the confusion, Gottesman asserts, is that there are two different philosophies behind investment practice: market timing and the modern portfolio theory. Both, Gottesman argues, are tricky to understand, let alone master. While Gottesman is less interested in the retirement space and more passionate about topics such as ETFs, his insight is applicable to the 401(k) industry. It all comes down to using a financial advisor and to fostering a relationship with that counsel.

Read the article: 401kWire

Law360: “EU’s Rate-Rigging Penalties May Do Little To Curb Abuses”

. . . The penalties on banks and other firms also need to be stiffened to be effective, and there are doubts about how willing member state regulators will be to pursue the maximum fines on institutions, said Roy Girasa, a professor at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business.

. . . The penalties on banks and other firms also need to be stiffened to be effective, and there are doubts about how willing member state regulators will be to pursue the maximum fines on institutions, said Roy Girasa, a professor at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business.

“The [European Parliament is] simply trying to send a message to them. State regulators have a lot of discretion with respect to that,” he said.

Read the article: Law360

Investor’s Business Daily: “Washington Post Might Get Help From Amazon Publishing”

Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at New York’s Pace University, says Bezos sees a chance to build a unique brand. “He wants entry into the content world (to balance his bet on e-reader hardware), and readers want credibility along with the information they read on the Internet,” said Chiagouris, a former chairman of the Advertising Research Foundation.

. . . Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at New York’s Pace University, says Bezos sees a chance to build a unique brand.

“He wants entry into the content world (to balance his bet on e-reader hardware), and readers want credibility along with the information they read on the Internet,” said Chiagouris, a former chairman of the Advertising Research Foundation.

He expects Bezos to expand the WaPo’s online content.

But Chiagouris said the purchase also has to do with Bezos wanting to put his imprint on future legislation and policy in Washington.

Bezos is aware that, as owner of the Washington Post, he can influence laws impacting e-commerce taxes, online privacy and other issues dear to Amazon. “It’s an insurance policy,” Chiagouris said.

Read the article in Investor’s Business Daily.

Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino Kicks off Week of Service at Pace

Pace’s Provost Uday Sukhatme, Ph.D., County Executive Robert Astorino and others wrote thank you notes to soldiers and police officers at Pace University in Pleasantville as part of the kick-off of the annual 9/11 week of service.

A press conference held at Pace University’s Plesantville campus kicked off the annual week of service in memory of those who were lost on 9/11. The event was covered by The Daily Voice, News 12, The Examiner, Patch.com, and Fox 5 News.

From the Examiner in Pleasantville:

In the dozen years since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the National Day of Service and Remembrance has been organized to honor the memories of the nearly 3,000 victims lost on that day.

Westchester County and The Volunteer Center of United Way are doing even more. On Tuesday at Pace University in Pleasantville, County Executive Rob Astorino helped kick off a weeklong joint effort with the United Way to encourage county residents to participate in one of the more than 25 service events and activities in Westchester.

The “9/11: Serve & Remember” initiative, which is spread over nine days, will culminate on the evening of Sept. 11 at Kensico Dam Plaza in Valhalla with the annual ceremony at the county’s memorial The Rising. During the final day of the effort, visitors can donate new and gently used soccer and baseball equipment that will be used by U.S. troops abroad through the Westchester-based nonprofit Let’s Play It Forward, Inc.

Individuals, students, families and members of the business community are encouraged to participate throughout the week.

“The families who lost loves ones that day didn’t just want us to reflect each year in sorrow,” said Alisa Kesten, executive director of The Volunteer Center. “They wanted us to do something positive to honor the memory of those we lost.”

Among the service projects the public can volunteer for are veteran and military outreach, helping at a soup kitchen, blood drives and food collections and removing vines from trees at FDR State Park in Yorktown.

Kesten said Serve & Remember has been extended to increase participation. If confined to one day, family, school and work obligations would exclude many residents who might otherwise want to serve, she said.

Astorino said the Serve & Remember week will remind people that there are hundreds of nonprofit organizations promoting a wide range of causes throughout the county that could use volunteers all year long. It will also help to rekindle the spirit of unity and compassion that swept over the nation in the weeks and months following the terrorist attacks, he said.

“You don’t have to wait, obviously, until September of each year to become a volunteer,” Astorino said. “You don’t have to wait for a formal list of activities. There are agencies every day that can use your help. There are people, people that you know, people that are strangers who every day can benefit from a kind heart.”

The start of the effort was appropriately announced at Pace’s Kessel Student Center. Pace has been one of the leaders among colleges and universities in getting its students to participate in community service, said Provost Eday Sukhatme. Since 2006, the university has been named to the President of the United States’ honor roll to recognize organizations that promote service, he said.

For the past 11 years, Pace has required its undergraduate students to take a civic participation and public administration course, which introduces them to service events in the area.

“We have been doing this a long time because not only do the students benefit the community but the learning they acquire in the community benefits them,” Uday said. “So it’s a two-way street and we believe in it.”

During his visit to the student center, Astorino sat down with several students to write a letter to soldiers stationed abroad, one of the service projects the school has organized.

Senior Hasin Ahmed, student outreach coordinator at Pace’s Center for Community Action and Research, said he’s been doing service work since high school. His involvement through internships with nonprofits organizations has been personally fulfilling and has exposed him to the possibility of different careers.

“I’ve had six internships with six different nonprofits and that wouldn’t have happened if I didn’t volunteer in the first place,” Ahmed said.

For a full list of activities to volunteer for and to register, visit www.westchestergov.com. or www.volunteer-center.org/service2013.

Read the original article:

http://www.theexaminernews.com/county-united-way-kick-off-start-of-911-serve-remember-in-wchester/

The Hill’s Congress Blog: “Hesitating over Syria: Ethnic dimensions of the conflict and a need for patience”

“Members of Congress should hesitate before forcing the hands of President Obama to act on the Syria conflict before it is the right time,” writes Michael Izady, a professor of Middle Eastern and Western history at Pace University. Izady is an expert on the Middle East who helps train and brief Special Forces troops and others in the U.S. military here and overseas on ethnic and social issues.

“Members of Congress should hesitate before forcing the hands of President Obama to act on the Syria conflict before it is the right time,” writes Michael Izady, a professor of Middle Eastern and Western history at Pace University. “The worst scenario is to bring more chaos by toppling the Assad regime while having no viable and desirable alternative to him in the opposition to guard the interests of all Syrians of all religious and ethnic persuasions.”

Read his op-ed on The Hill’s Congress Blog.

Associated Press: “In Nokia acquisition, Microsoft tries to catch up”

. . . “It’s a three-horse race, and Microsoft knows it needs to come up with a more well-defined plan for mobile devices to catch up,” said Darren Hayes, a computer science professor at Pace University in New York. “This was an essential acquisition for them.”

. . . “It’s a three-horse race, and Microsoft knows it needs to come up with a more well-defined plan for mobile devices to catch up,” said Darren Hayes, a computer science professor at Pace University in New York. “This was an essential acquisition for them.”

Read the article by Associated Press.

Read more comments from Professor Hayes:  Computerworld, Time, and USA Today.

The Hill’s Congress Blog: “Obama’s timetable for action on bank rules is unrealistic”

“The United States is in danger from rushing forward with overwhelmingly complex laws, mandates, and eventually regulations for financial institutions,” writes John Alan James, executive director of the Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation at Pace.

“The United States is in danger from rushing forward with overwhelmingly complex laws, mandates, and eventually regulations for financial institutions,” writes John Alan James, executive director of the Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business.

Read his op-ed on The Hill’s Congress Blog.

Newsday: “Kid off to college? Don’t forget siblings”

Read advice from Jennifer Powell-Lunder, who grew up in Roslyn and is now an adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University in Westchester and co-author of “Teenage as a Second Language: A Parent’s Guide to Becoming Bilingual.”

Read advice from Jennifer Powell-Lunder, who grew up in Roslyn and is now an adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University in Westchester and co-author of “Teenage as a Second Language: A Parent’s Guide to Becoming Bilingual.”

Journal News: “‘Latino U’ helps kids navigate college applications, get admitted (video)”

. . . The group is looking for partners and donations, and its first fundraising effort is slated for this fall, said Shirley Acevedo Buontempo, founder and executive director. It already has made connections with WCC and Pace University, and Pace University’s Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship is paying for a summer intern, Diana Mendez, to help with paperwork.

. . . The group is looking for partners and donations, and its first fundraising effort is slated for this fall, said Shirley Acevedo Buontempo, founder and executive director. It already has made connections with WCC and Pace University, and Pace University’s Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship is paying for a summer intern, Diana Mendez, to help with paperwork.

Read the article and watch the video on lohud.com.

 

 

Westchester County Business Journal: “Pace to offer computer science Ph.D”

. . . “The goal of the new Ph.D program is to build on Pace’s successful B.S. in computer science, M.S. in computer science and D.P.S. in computing programs and cultivate advanced computing research scholars and professionals who will be competent in both industry and academia,” said Dr. Amar Gupta, dean of the Seidenberg School.

. . . This is the first Ph.D program in computer science in the Hudson Valley between New York City and Albany. Students will be closely integrated in applied research projects that emphasize telehealth and biometrics, web computing and information assurance, artificial intelligence and robotics, and software engineering and formal methods.

To learn more about the program, call graduate admission at 914-422-4283, email gradwp@pace.edu or visit http://www.pace.edu/seidenberg/seidenberg-programs/doctoral-programs/doctor-philosophy-computer-science 

Read about it on Journal News blog The Hall Monitor  and Westchester County Business Journal.