The Journal News: Pace University Gets $60,000 Grant | LoHud.com

The Journal News reported that Pace University’s College of Health Professions has been awarded a grant of $60,000 from the Jewish Foundation for Education of Women to provide scholarships to female veterans or female dependents of veterans. The scholarships of up to $10,000 per year are available for the next two years to qualifying students. (Left: First scholarship recipient, Casmin Bennett.)

Pace University gets $60,000 grant

From The Journal News:

Pace University’s College of Health Professions has been awarded a grant of $60,000 from the Jewish Foundation for Education of Women to provide scholarships to female veterans or female dependents of veterans. The scholarships of up to $10,000 per year are available for the next two years to qualifying students in the Combined Degree program, the undergraduate RN-4 program (junior and senior years), the Family Nurse Practitioner program and the Physician Assistant program. U.S. Army veteran Casmin Bennett is the first scholarship awardee at Pace; she is a student in the Combined Degree Program, a 12-month accelerated nursing baccalaureate program for career changers.

Westchester schools briefs: 7 Byram Hills students are National Merit semifinalists | The Journal News | LoHud.com | lohud.com.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University College of Health Professions Receives Veterans’ Grant

Pace University’s College of Health Professions has been awarded a grant of $60,000 from the Jewish Foundation for Education of Women to provide scholarships to female veterans or female dependents of veterans. The scholarships of up to $10,000 per year are available for the next two years to qualifying students in the Combined Degree program, the undergraduate RN-4 program (junior and senior years), the Family Nurse Practitioner program, and the Physician Assistant program.

Pace University College of Health Professions Receives Veterans’ Grant

NEW YORK, NY, September 12, 2012 – Pace University’s College of Health Professions has been awarded a grant of $60,000 from the Jewish Foundation for Education of Women to provide scholarships to female veterans or female dependents of veterans. The scholarships of up to $10,000 per year are available for the next two years to qualifying students in the Combined Degree program, the undergraduate RN-4 program (junior and senior years), the Family Nurse Practitioner program, and the Physician Assistant program.

The first scholarship awardee at Pace is US Army veteran Casmin Bennett, a student in the Combined Degree Program, a 12-month accelerated nursing baccalaureate program for career changers.

Bennett says, “I grew up in Jamaica and came to the U.S. in 2000. I did not always want to be a nurse, but on deployment to Iraq, I had an epiphany. I can still vividly remember telling my sergeant that when it was over, I would return home and do something meaningful with my life. I came home and I have been working toward this goal ever since. The foundation’s scholarship will greatly alleviate the financial burden of paying for my nursing degree.”

Robert Rahni, Veteran Specialist and adjunct professor at Pace said, “Casmin Bennett has honorably served our nation. The funds from the foundation’s Veterans Grant with the Pace 50% Veterans Scholarship and her well-deserved GI Bill benefits will enable her to complete the nursing program expeditiously.”

“Thanks to the generous support of the Jewish Foundation for Education of Women, this is the first grant that is available to both nursing and physician assistant students, and the first grant specifically for female veterans and their dependents at Pace,” said Sophie Kaufman, executive director of the Center of Excellence – ALPS (Advancing Leadership, Partnerships, and Scholarship) at Pace’s College of Health Professions.

“The Lienhard School of Nursing has a history of commitment to helping veterans,” said Gerrie Colombraro, PhD, RN, interim dean of the College of Health Professions. “In 2009, Lienhard was one of the few nursing schools to participate in the Veterans Affairs Nursing Academy, a partnership to increase nursing faculty and students and enhance the professional development of VA nurses.”

In addition, Lienhard was one of 20 nursing schools nationwide to be invited to an event earlier this year with First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden as part of the Joining Forces initiative to educate nursing students on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury.

Veteran-turned-actor Matthew Pennington spoke to Pace nursing and physician assistant students in the spring about his experiences with PTSD, highlighted in A Marine’s Guide to Fishing – a short film in which he stars.

“During clinical rotations Pace students are very adept at sorting out the medical conditions of their patients at the Manhattan Veterans Affairs Hospital but are sometimes uncertain as how to approach patients with PTSD and substance abuse issues,” said nursing professor Joanne Knoesel, RN. “Hearing from a vet with PTSD provided them with better insight on how to help these patients.”

In addition to the new scholarship, Pace offers other scholarships for veterans and was selected by G.I. Jobs magazine as a Military Friendly School for 2012, an honor awarded to only 15% of all colleges, universities, and trade schools nationwide.

Pace offers a Veterans Scholarship which can cover half of a student’s tuition (in fall and spring semesters) for full and part-time undergraduate and graduate students.  Additionally, admitted veterans are eligible to receive need-based financial aid from Pace as well as benefits offered by the GI Bill. Veteran students may be eligible to receive full coverage of tuition through Pace’s Yellow Ribbon Program. Pace University also provides application fee waivers to all veteran applicants.

According to Rahni, “The Veteran Affairs team at Pace is committed to ensuring that veteran students’ transitions are seamless.”

Students who wish to apply for the scholarship can contact Sophie Kaufman (skaufman@pace.edu) or Robert Rahni, Pace Veteran Specialist (rrahni@pace.edu).

About The Jewish Foundation for Education of Women (JFEW):  The Jewish Foundation for Education of Women is a New York City-based, nonsectarian organization helping women with financial need meet their education and career goals through scholarships and opportunities for professional development. In partnership with schools and nonprofits, JFEW fosters a community of women dedicated to education, professional achievement and who contribute to society. www.jfew.org

About the College of Health Professions: Pace’s College of Health Professions is made up of the Lienhard School of Nursing and the Pace University-Lenox Hill Hospital Physician Assistant Studies program. Students at the College learn evidence-based care, cultural competence and primary health care in an interprofessional setting in programs preparing them to be family nurse practitioners, advanced practice nurses, physician assistants, registered nurses and clinical leaders.

About Pace University For over 100 years, Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media Contact: Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu, 914-906-9680.

NEWS ADVISORY: War Veteran Turned Actor to Appear at Pace to Discuss Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

On June 26, 28-year-old war veteran turned actor Matthew Pennington will address future health care workers from Pace University’s College of Health Professions and lead a discussion about his struggles with PTSD after coming home from serving three tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan.

War Veteran Turned Actor to Appear at Pace University         

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder will be Discussed

“Matthew Pennington, an Army veteran who lost his left leg in Iraq, makes his acting debut as a wounded Marine trying to adjust to civilian life. The role is reminiscent of Harold Russell’s double Academy Award-winning portrayal of a wounded veteran returning from World War II in the 1946 film, ‘The Best Years of Our Lives.’”- The New York Times

NEW YORK, NY, June 18, 2012 – According to a study of the mental health of troops, one in eight soldiers who fought in Iraq report having Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), the psychological wounds that often prove more debilitating than the physical ones.

On June 26, 28-year-old war veteran turned actor Matthew Pennington will address future health care workers from Pace University’s College of Health Professions and lead a discussion about his struggles with PTSD after coming home from serving three tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan.

“A Marine’s Guide to Fishing,” a 15-minute film starring Pennington will be screened. The film portrays a young veteran’s return to his old job on the one-year anniversary of “the day he didn’t die” when he was severely injured, losing his left leg and shattering his right leg in the war in Iraq. A Q&A session will follow with Pennington, his wife Marjorie, writer and director Nicholas Brennan, and producer John Logan Pierson.

The event will take place June 26 from 5:30pm – 7:30pm at Pace University, One Pace Plaza, across from City Hall, (entrance on Spruce Street) in the Multipurpose Room. The event will be video-conferenced to Pace’s Pleasantville campus, 861 Bedford Road, entrance 2, Miller Hall room 16.

A New York Times article sparked interest in planning the film screening.  Nursing professor Joanne Knoesel, RN, read the article in January and thought about the veterans Pace nursing students care for at the Manhattan Veterans Affairs hospital.

“During clinical rotations the students are very adept at sorting out the medical conditions that their patients have but sometimes uncertain as how to approach patients with PTSD and substance abuse issues,” said Knoesel. “Hearing from a vet with PTSD can provide us with better insight on how to help these patients.”

This event is free and open to the public. RSVP by e-mailing ddumitru@pace.edu. Health Care workers, nursing or medical students, and anyone who encounters veterans can benefit from learning about Pennington’s experience.

More information about the film which won “best narrative short” at the GI Film Festival last year, as well as Pennington’s biography can be found at http://amarinesguide.com/. To learn more about how the College of Health Professions is supporting our nation’s veterans, click here.

Contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

The Journal News: Sisters host walk after mom’s stroke | LoHud.com

Two College of Health Professions alumni, both nurses at Northern Westchester Hospital Center in Mount Kisco, were featured in The Journal News for organizing an annual fundraising walk in Somers to benefit stroke victims. (Left: Sisters Lisa Mitchell, left, and Valerie Goodwin, right, are seen with their mother, Annie Mitchell, at her home in Somers. Annie survived a stroke in 2009, which prompted her daughters to organize a walk in Somers. / Xavier Mascareñas/The Journal News).

Two College of Health Professions alumni, both nurses at Northern Westchester Hospital Center in Mount Kisco, were featured in The Journal News for organizing an annual fundraising walk in Somers to benefit stroke victims.

Families traditionally come together to celebrate their mothers today, but at the Mitchells’ house it is a particularly special day.

Annie Mitchell suffered what could have been a debilitating stroke in August 2009 when she was just 52. She and her two daughters, Lisa Mitchell and Valerie Goodwin, have gained a deeper appreciation for each other and stronger mother-daughter-sister bonds that they have turned into positive action for the larger Somers community.

“I was lucky. I am lucky,” Annie Mitchell said sitting at her kitchen table flanked by her two daughters, clearly showing that she means she has good fortune because of her adoring daughters and her stroke recovery.

Thursday the women were laughing, hugging and sharing smiles as they planned a casual Mother’s Day gathering with lots of family. Next Sunday there will be a community event to raise stroke awareness and and generate much-needed money for support and research.

Two summers ago Annie Mitchell woke up at 5 a.m. to her alarm clock but found she could not lift her arm to turn it off.

“She had no use of her left arm. When she went to get out of bed, she felt dizzy and was off balance,” said Lisa Mitchell, 24. Her mother woke up Gary, her husband of 33 years, and they both became aware of other symptoms as she tried to tell him how odd she was suddenly feeling.

“I heard my voice was slurring,” said the mother, a secretary at Lincoln Hall of her strange sensations when she awoke. “And I just didn’t feel right.”

“She never gets sick and is very active walking 2 to 3 miles almost every day and going to the gym,” said Goodwin, 29, who is married and lives nearby.

Both daughters graduated from Somers High School and Pace University School of Nursing. They are registered nurses at Northern Westchester Hospital Center in Mount Kisco and got their mom to their hospital for quick treatment.

Her stroke was caused by a blood clot. After weeks of speech therapy, occupational therapy and physical therapy, Mitchell has 95 percent recovered.

Read full article: Sisters host walk after mom’s stroke | The Journal News | LoHud.com | LoHud.com.

Nursing Spectrum: The right to the title ‘doctor’ | New Jersey Nursing News

In an article in Nursing Spectrum, Harriet Feldman weighed in on proposed legislation that would limit the use of the title “doctor” to physicians and dentists.

In an article in Nursing Spectrum, Harriet Feldman weighed in on proposed legislation that would limit the use of the title “doctor” to physicians and dentists.

Harriet R. Feldman, RN, PhD, FAAN, interim provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at Pace University in Pleasantville, N.Y., [said], “Healthcare belongs to a variety of professionals, many of whom have the title ‘doctor’ as a result of years of education and, for most, vast years of experience,” she said. “In these days of multi- and interdisciplinary practice and multiple points of entry to healthcare, such a concept is backwards and not in the best interests of patients.”

Many states have taken steps to enact or introduce “Truth in Advertising” legislation. Taking it one step further, in January 2011 then-New York Sen. Carl Kruger (D-27) introduced consumer protection bill S02250. The bill seeks to restrict the use of the term “doctor” in advertisements to only those who hold a medical degree or a degree in dentistry, as defined by the State Education Department. The bill has been endorsed by state medical associations, including The Medical Society of the State of New York and New York County Medical Society. Delaware has similar legislation to S02550 already in place.

In New York, the legislation most likely will not affect nurses’ practice, said Abby C. Kurtz, RN. “The quality of care that is provided by nurses, including DNPs, is not sacrificed nor dependent on the title,” she said.

via The right to the title ‘doctor’ | New Jersey Nursing News.

Nursing Spectrum: Notable Nurses – Meet Joanne Singleton

Nursing Spectrum featured nursing professor Joanne Singleton, RN, FNP, PhD, chair of graduate studies and director of the Doctor of Nursing Practice program at Pace’s College of Health Professions, who was inducted as a fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine in November.

Nursing Spectrum featured nursing professor Joanne Singleton, RN, FNP, PhD, chair of graduate studies and director of the Doctor of Nursing Practice program at Pace’s College of Health Professions, who was inducted as a fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine in November.

View the article online here. View a pdf of the article here.

Singleton was also mentioned in another Nursing Spectrum/Nurse.com article that names the Nursing Excellence finalists.

From Nurse.com:

Each year, Nurse.com/Nursing Spectrum calls upon our readers to nominate exceptional nurse colleagues for our Nursing Excellence program. For more than a decade, we have received thousands of entries that contain stories of phenomenal nurse leaders, mentors and clinicians. This year has proven no different. The nurses nominated for our 2012 Nursing Excellence program have proven true nursing excellence is alive and well.

Joanne Singleton, RN, PhD, FNP-BC, FNAP, FNYAM, professor, chair of the Department of Graduate Studies and DNP Program director, Pace University, Lienhard School of Nursing, Pleasantville, N.Y.

Excelling in teaching, scholarship and service, Singleton helped launch Pace’s first DNP program, guiding the first class of 20 students through the experience. Singleton has a commitment to evidence-based practice, leading faculty members a decade ago to revise Pace’s Family Nurse Practitioner curriculum to use an evidence-based practice framework. Distinguishing herself with numerous peer-reviewed publications, Singleton led a faculty team in a systematic review of smoking cessation initiatives and provides consultations and presentations on health-related topics to New York City public schools. Colleagues are impressed by Singleton’s teaching skills at Pace, where she receives positive evaluations from students and received a Lienhard School of Nursing Award for Teaching Excellence in May 2010. She also is a respected member of the Lienhard Leadership Team and has been instrumental in developing the college’s strategic plan. Blazing new paths in scholarship aimed at eliminating health disparities, Singleton is dedicated to cultural competence, evidence-based practice and primary healthcare.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University College of Health Professions to Unveil New Clinical Education Labs

Seven of the 10 fastest-growing jobs in the United States are in health care, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Pace University’s College of Health Professions has made a significant investment in preparing the next generation of health care professionals with the construction of its new Clinical Education Labs. The facilities will be unveiled on Tuesday, June 19 from 5:30pm to 7:00pm on the 5th floor of 163 William Street in New York City.

Grand Opening and Ribbon-Cutting at 163 William Street Set for Tuesday, June 19, 5:30pm – 7:00pm

NEW YORK, NY, May 9, 2012 – Seven of the 10 fastest-growing jobs in the United States are in health care, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Pace University’s College of Health Professions has made a significant investment in preparing the next generation of health care professionals with the construction of its new Clinical Education Labs. The facilities will be unveiled on Tuesday, June 19 from 5:30pm to 7:00pm on the 5th floor of 163 William Street in New York City.

This state-of-the-art complex occupies 17,000 square feet with simulation centers, laboratories and classrooms containing advanced equipment that simulates real patients in a hospital room or other health care setting.  The renovations cost $2.2
million. A bequest of $225,000 from alumna Maymarie Conte, ’78, will support the purchase of high tech video capture and playback systems used in the simulation rooms.

The labs have “METIman” and “SimBaby,” the latest generation of human patient simulators (HPS), along with a video capture and playback system that includes camera feeds from 11 simulation rooms.  Videos are stored and viewed on computers, allowing faculty members to evaluate and debrief students on performance.  For clinical practice and testing, faculty and staff help students hone their skills by matching them with standardized patients played by actors. Several of Pace’s clinical partners throughout the
region will also use the space to train health care workers.

Speakers at the unveiling ceremony will include Pace President Stephen J. Friedman, College of Health Professions and school of nursing dean Harriet R. Feldman, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, and Provost Uday Sukhatme, Sc.D.  In addition, interim dean of the College of Health Professions, Geraldine C. Colombraro, Ph.D., RN, will be on hand with faculty members, students and staff.

For more information about the event, contact Paul Dana at (212) 618-6041 or pdana@pace.edu. For more information about the College of Health Professions, visit www.pace.edu/chp.

About the College of Health Professions: Pace’s College of Health Professions is made up of the Lienhard School of
Nursing and the Pace University-Lenox Hill Hospital Physician Assistant Studies program. Students at the College learn evidence-based care, cultural competence and primary health care in an interprofessional setting in programs preparing them to be family nurse practitioners, advanced practice nurses, physician assistants, registered nurses and clinical leaders.

About Pace University:
For 105 years, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high-quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral
programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact: Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu, 914-906-9680

LA Times: Grandma on Facebook? Sure, seniors say as they learn computers

In the second article in two months in the LA Times, Professor Jean Coppola’s technology program for seniors is featured.
(Photo: Rosemary Nickola works on her computer with her dog, Delilah, on her lap in her New York apartment in February. At that time, Nickola was struggling with technology, but this week she earned a certificate after completing a computer course. Credit – Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times / April 30, 2012.)

Two months ago, Rosemary Nickola struggled to find her email, couldn’t tell the difference between spam messages and genuine communication, and had no idea what Facebook was.

“Spacebook?! What’s spacebook?” she replied when Pace University student Alice Simmons asked her back in February if she was familiar with Facebook, the social networking site.

But on Monday, Nickola held a certificate of achievement in her hands, having completed a computer course that is bringing together the 70-, 80- and 90-something crowd with university students in a program that is disproving the idea that technology is best left to the young.

We first wrote about the program, created by Pace University professor Jean Coppola, in early March, days after the latest session had begun. Nickola was one of dozens of senior citizens at the Hallmark assisted living facility in Manhattan who had signed up for what Coppola calls the “gerontechnology program.” Each senior was paired with a student from nearby Pace University for several weeks of one-on-one tutoring. Another course took place at a senior center in Westchester County, north of New York City.

Monday was graduation day for the Hallmark crowd, where computer students were awarded their diplomas in a room festooned with balloons and lined with tables overloaded with brownies, cookies and other goodies provided by the young tutors. One by one, the graduates walked — some leaning on canes or walkers — to a podium to receive their diplomas and say a few words.

“I just want to thank these lovely children for bringing me back to life,” said Nickola, who briefly dropped the course in frustration after her first tutoring session. Back then, she had trouble with her Internet connection and battled to master the computer that her son had set up in her Hallmark apartment.

But Nickola, a petite 84-year-old with snowy white curls and wide blue eyes, said she resumed the course to shake off the loneliness that has engulfed her since her husband’s death in 2008.

“It took a while, but this is waking me up,” said Nickola as her young tutor, Rose Koron, with bangs dyed a pale blue, stood at her side. It was a sentiment echoed by several of the senior graduates, who spoke of the isolation of being elderly and trying to keep up with a tech-savvy world that rarely appreciates the limitations that come with age.

Coppola said the course fills a need that will grow as baby boomers age, as people live longer and as technology becomes more prevalent in such everyday matters as shopping and communication.

“The baby boomers this year just started turning 65,” said Coppola, adding that baby boomers today don’t necessarily want to spend their time in group activities if they can be chatting on Skype to distant friends and lov

via Grandma on Facebook? Sure, seniors say as they learn computers – latimes.com.

NYTimes.com: The Faces of Alzheimer’s – Well Blog

A blog piece on the Alzheimer’s photography symposium and exhibit at Pace appeared on the “Well” blog of the New York Times with 14 pages of photos.

A blog piece on the Alzheimer’s photography exhibit at Pace appeared on the “Well” blog of the New York Times with 14 pages of photos. From the post:

“The prevailing view of people with Alzheimer’s is often a depressing one: the patient slumped in a chair or parked in front of a television set. But a new book and photo exhibition this month in New York show another side of the disease, one in which people with dementia can still be engaged, lead active lives and experience love and joy.

The book, “Love, Loss and Laughter: Seeing Alzheimer’s Differently,” was written by Cathy Greenblat, a professor emerita of sociology at Rutgers University who found a second career as a photographer. The exhibition has toured the world and is currently on display at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University in Manhattan.

“I wanted to show what many people don’t know about Alzheimer’s,” Ms. Greenblat said, “that there are ways we can take care of people that build on their remaining capacities instead of just protecting them from danger.”

In one of the many vivid photographs in her book, Ms. Greenblat shows an elderly Houston woman named Luleene, a former musician who played the organ, sang and loved animals, with her husband, Joe. To help her feel connected to her past, the hospice that assists her includes sessions with a music therapist in her weekly program as well as visits with pets.

In India, a former math teacher, now with dementia, is shown dutifully scribbling numbers on a blackboard purchased by the staff at her day care center to help her experience old pleasures. Each line, perhaps inscrutable to the staff, is nonetheless a victory for the former teacher.

“These photos are meant to challenge the way we think about Alzheimer’s,” said Ms. Greenblat, whose project was inspired in part by personal experience. Both of her maternal grandparents developed Alzheimer’s in their later years, as did her mother. “People look at some of these photos and say, ‘Oh, this person can’t have Alzheimer’s.’ But they don’t realize that they have a range of emotions. People don’t imagine that someone with Alzheimer’s can be smiling or happy and having a good time.” ”

The Faces of Alzheimer’s – NYTimes.com.

The Daily Pleasantville: Pace Nurses Join Forces With Michelle Obama

Pace Interim Provost Harriet Feldman recently spent a day with Michelle Obama and Jill Biden with other nursing school heads who are collaborating to provide better care for veterans.

Pace Interim Provost Harriet Feldman recently spent a day with Michelle Obama and Jill Biden with other nursing school heads who are collaborating to provide better care for veterans.

The Daily Pleasantville wrote about the event:

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing is among only 20 nursing schools nationwide invited to join first lady Michelle Obama at her annual Joining Forces event in 2012.

The initiative, which Obama created with second lady Jill Biden last year, consists of nearly 500 universities that have vowed to focus on treatment for returning soldiers.

“It is a privilege and honor to support this special initiative,” said Dr. Harriet Feldman, former dean of the Lienhard School of Nursing who is currently the university’s interim provost and executive vice president for academic affairs.

Joining Forces is not Pace’s first foray into military treatment. During Feldman’s tenure as dean, Pace was one of 12 nursing programs that participated in the Veterans Affairs Nursing Academy.

“Our veterans have given their all in support of countless missions, and we owe them the opportunity to be whole again, in body, mind and spirit,” said Feldman, who plans on working on the initiative closely with Dr. Gerrie Colombraro, the school’s interim dean.

Much of the initiative will focus on combating “invisible wounds” from war such as post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury and depression. According to Joining Forces, the mental health disorders impact approximately one in six American troops returning from Afghanistan and Iraq.

Obama launched Joining forces with Biden in April 2011 and plans to have the lesson plans integrated into the nursing schools, including Pace, by 2014. On Wednesday night, Obama appeared on The Colbert Report to discuss the initiative on its one-year anniversary.

“Jill Biden and I started this initiative to make sure that this country, which is a grateful nation, that we make sure we do whatever we can to honor the service of our troops, our veterans and their families,” Obama said on the program.

via Pace Nurses Join Forces With Michelle Obama | The Daily Pleasantville.