The Journal News: Pace University Gets $60,000 Grant | LoHud.com

The Journal News reported that Pace University’s College of Health Professions has been awarded a grant of $60,000 from the Jewish Foundation for Education of Women to provide scholarships to female veterans or female dependents of veterans. The scholarships of up to $10,000 per year are available for the next two years to qualifying students. (Left: First scholarship recipient, Casmin Bennett.)

Pace University gets $60,000 grant

From The Journal News:

Pace University’s College of Health Professions has been awarded a grant of $60,000 from the Jewish Foundation for Education of Women to provide scholarships to female veterans or female dependents of veterans. The scholarships of up to $10,000 per year are available for the next two years to qualifying students in the Combined Degree program, the undergraduate RN-4 program (junior and senior years), the Family Nurse Practitioner program and the Physician Assistant program. U.S. Army veteran Casmin Bennett is the first scholarship awardee at Pace; she is a student in the Combined Degree Program, a 12-month accelerated nursing baccalaureate program for career changers.

Westchester schools briefs: 7 Byram Hills students are National Merit semifinalists | The Journal News | LoHud.com | lohud.com.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University College of Health Professions Receives Veterans’ Grant

Pace University’s College of Health Professions has been awarded a grant of $60,000 from the Jewish Foundation for Education of Women to provide scholarships to female veterans or female dependents of veterans. The scholarships of up to $10,000 per year are available for the next two years to qualifying students in the Combined Degree program, the undergraduate RN-4 program (junior and senior years), the Family Nurse Practitioner program, and the Physician Assistant program.

Pace University College of Health Professions Receives Veterans’ Grant

NEW YORK, NY, September 12, 2012 – Pace University’s College of Health Professions has been awarded a grant of $60,000 from the Jewish Foundation for Education of Women to provide scholarships to female veterans or female dependents of veterans. The scholarships of up to $10,000 per year are available for the next two years to qualifying students in the Combined Degree program, the undergraduate RN-4 program (junior and senior years), the Family Nurse Practitioner program, and the Physician Assistant program.

The first scholarship awardee at Pace is US Army veteran Casmin Bennett, a student in the Combined Degree Program, a 12-month accelerated nursing baccalaureate program for career changers.

Bennett says, “I grew up in Jamaica and came to the U.S. in 2000. I did not always want to be a nurse, but on deployment to Iraq, I had an epiphany. I can still vividly remember telling my sergeant that when it was over, I would return home and do something meaningful with my life. I came home and I have been working toward this goal ever since. The foundation’s scholarship will greatly alleviate the financial burden of paying for my nursing degree.”

Robert Rahni, Veteran Specialist and adjunct professor at Pace said, “Casmin Bennett has honorably served our nation. The funds from the foundation’s Veterans Grant with the Pace 50% Veterans Scholarship and her well-deserved GI Bill benefits will enable her to complete the nursing program expeditiously.”

“Thanks to the generous support of the Jewish Foundation for Education of Women, this is the first grant that is available to both nursing and physician assistant students, and the first grant specifically for female veterans and their dependents at Pace,” said Sophie Kaufman, executive director of the Center of Excellence – ALPS (Advancing Leadership, Partnerships, and Scholarship) at Pace’s College of Health Professions.

“The Lienhard School of Nursing has a history of commitment to helping veterans,” said Gerrie Colombraro, PhD, RN, interim dean of the College of Health Professions. “In 2009, Lienhard was one of the few nursing schools to participate in the Veterans Affairs Nursing Academy, a partnership to increase nursing faculty and students and enhance the professional development of VA nurses.”

In addition, Lienhard was one of 20 nursing schools nationwide to be invited to an event earlier this year with First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden as part of the Joining Forces initiative to educate nursing students on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury.

Veteran-turned-actor Matthew Pennington spoke to Pace nursing and physician assistant students in the spring about his experiences with PTSD, highlighted in A Marine’s Guide to Fishing – a short film in which he stars.

“During clinical rotations Pace students are very adept at sorting out the medical conditions of their patients at the Manhattan Veterans Affairs Hospital but are sometimes uncertain as how to approach patients with PTSD and substance abuse issues,” said nursing professor Joanne Knoesel, RN. “Hearing from a vet with PTSD provided them with better insight on how to help these patients.”

In addition to the new scholarship, Pace offers other scholarships for veterans and was selected by G.I. Jobs magazine as a Military Friendly School for 2012, an honor awarded to only 15% of all colleges, universities, and trade schools nationwide.

Pace offers a Veterans Scholarship which can cover half of a student’s tuition (in fall and spring semesters) for full and part-time undergraduate and graduate students.  Additionally, admitted veterans are eligible to receive need-based financial aid from Pace as well as benefits offered by the GI Bill. Veteran students may be eligible to receive full coverage of tuition through Pace’s Yellow Ribbon Program. Pace University also provides application fee waivers to all veteran applicants.

According to Rahni, “The Veteran Affairs team at Pace is committed to ensuring that veteran students’ transitions are seamless.”

Students who wish to apply for the scholarship can contact Sophie Kaufman (skaufman@pace.edu) or Robert Rahni, Pace Veteran Specialist (rrahni@pace.edu).

About The Jewish Foundation for Education of Women (JFEW):  The Jewish Foundation for Education of Women is a New York City-based, nonsectarian organization helping women with financial need meet their education and career goals through scholarships and opportunities for professional development. In partnership with schools and nonprofits, JFEW fosters a community of women dedicated to education, professional achievement and who contribute to society. www.jfew.org

About the College of Health Professions: Pace’s College of Health Professions is made up of the Lienhard School of Nursing and the Pace University-Lenox Hill Hospital Physician Assistant Studies program. Students at the College learn evidence-based care, cultural competence and primary health care in an interprofessional setting in programs preparing them to be family nurse practitioners, advanced practice nurses, physician assistants, registered nurses and clinical leaders.

About Pace University For over 100 years, Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media Contact: Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu, 914-906-9680.

The Journal News, News 12 and The Daily Pleasantville: Pleasantville’s Pace Gets Solar Classroom

Pace unveiled its new solar classroom, funded by Con Edison, and The Journal News, News 12 and The Daily Pleasantville reported on the event. (Left: Angelo Spillo, director of the Environmental Center at Pace, addresses the crowd at Thursday’s solar panel unveiling. Photo credit: Brian Marschhauser)

Pace unveiled its new solar classroom, thanks in part to a grant from Con Edison, and The Journal News, News 12, The Daily Pleasantville and Patch.com reported on the event.

From The Daily Pleasantville:

Sunny skies aptly shined down on the Pace University campus Thursday afternoon as its Environmental Center celebrated the opening of its new solar-powered classroom.

“Can you feel the electricity being made?” said Angelo Spillo, director of the Environmental Center.

The panels were funded by Con Edison, which awarded Pace with a $15,000 grant as part of its effort to expand solar development in New York. A similar initiative was also signed into action by Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Thursday.

“A lot of times we have so much dialogue and you see much going on back and forth as far as solar industry and solar power at this point,” said County Legislator Michael Smith. “A lot of what you read is just the talk. This is the doing, and we need more doing and we need less talk.”

While the solar panels will help the center save money on its electrical bill, Spillo said that was not the motivation behind its installation. The equipment will instead be used as a teaching tool.

“One of the things we wanted to do was keep this equipment visible,” Spillo said. “If you were doing it in a home, you would want to hide it, you would want to put it in the basement, it’s kind of unsightly. In our case, we want our students to see it.”

Helping to design the conversion was William Misicka, a senior student in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences’ Environmental Studies Program at Pace. Misicka performed research on solar energy and went on a solar site survey with a contracting company.

“This is a virus, it’s a good virus, and this is how it spreads. Congratulations to Pace on your accomplishment,” said Smith. “Let the sun shine.”

From The Journal News:

“The university opened its solar classroom – a former cottage that now has solar panels on the roof – this afternoon (Wednesday). Con Edison supported the project as part of its commitment to promoting education and environmental awareness in Westchester County and New York City.

“The solar classroom at Pace University will help us spread our message about the environmental and economic benefits of solar power,” said Frances A. Resheske, Con Edison’s senior vice president for Public Affairs. “The incentives government agencies are offering make this a great time for customers to consider whether they can cut their energy bills by using solar energy.”

The Con Edison grant allowed Pace to add solar panels to a building in its Environmental Center. The panels provide 1.5 kilowatts of electricity to the building.

Hundreds of Pace students and visitors use the classroom each year. The university plans to use the classroom to show that solar power can be a viable alternative to fossil fuels.

William Misicka, a student in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences’ Environmental Studies program, designed the conversion.”

via Carmel student helps Pace get a solar classroom | Northern Westchester.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing Joins Forces with the First Lady and Dr. Biden to Support Veterans and Military Families

Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing was among only 20 nursing schools nationwide invited to “joining forces” event with First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden.

PACE UNIVERSITY’S LIENHARD SCHOOL OF NURSING  JOINS FORCES WITH THE FIRST LADY AND DR. BIDEN TO SUPPORT VETERANS AND MILITARY FAMILIES

Lienhard School of Nursing Among Only 20 Nursing Schools Nationwide Invited to Joining Forces event with First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden

Lienhard School of Nursing will join the ranks of hundreds of others in educating nursing students on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the coming years

NEW YORK, NY, April 11, 2012 – Today First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden announced a commitment from nurses across the country eager to serve our veterans and military families as well as they have served us.

In a broad, coordinated effort, more than 150 state and national nursing organizations and over 500 nursing schools including Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing have committed to further educate our nation’s 3 million nurses so they are prepared to meet the unique health needs of service members, veterans, and their families. Led by the American Nurses Association, American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and the National League for Nursing, in coordination with the Departments of Veterans Affairs and Defense, nursing organizations and schools have committed to educating current and future nurses on how to recognize and care for veterans impacted by post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, depression, and other combat-related issues, in ways appropriate to each nurse’s practice setting.

“Whether we’re in a hospital, a doctor’s office or a community health center, nurses are often the first people we see when we walk through the door. Because of their expertise, they are trusted to be the frontline of America’s health care system,” said First Lady Michelle Obama. “That’s why Jill and I knew we could turn to America’s nurses and nursing students to help our veterans and military families get the world-class care that they’ve earned. It’s clear from today’s announcement that the nursing community is well on its way to serving our men and women in uniform and their families.”

“Nurses are at the center of providing lifesaving care in communities across the country — and their reach is particularly important because our veterans don’t always seek care through the VA system,” said Dr. Jill Biden. “This commitment is essential to ensuring our returning service men and women receive the care they deserve.”

“It is a privilege and honor to support this special initiative, having been one of 12 nursing programs to participate in the Veterans Affairs Nursing Academy while I was in the role of Dean of the Lienhard School of Nursing,” said Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, former dean of Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing who is currently the University’s Interim Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs. “Our veterans have given their all in support of countless missions, and we owe them the opportunity to be whole again, in body, mind, and spirit. Pace has a longstanding commitment to educating and supporting veterans and educational initiatives such as this build on that support.  I look forward to working closely with Dr. Gerrie Colombraro, Interim Dean of the Lienhard School, and our faculty to ensure that we meet the curriculum objectives of the project.”

The invisible wounds of war, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), have impacted approximately 1 in 6 of our troops returning from Afghanistan and Iraq – more than 300,000 veterans. And since 2000, more than 44,000 of those troops have suffered at least a moderate-grade traumatic brain injury.

Veterans seeking care within the Veterans Affairs (VA) health system are often treated by health care professionals who have received extensive training in mental health issues.  But the majority of veterans in the country seek care outside of the VA system — they usually visit their local hospital staffed by nurses and doctors in their communities. That’s why today’s announcement will be so significant for our troops and their families. America’s nurses are trusted partners in providing lifesaving and life-sustaining care in nearly every community and every setting where health care is delivered. They can make a dramatic and positive impact on the long-term health of hundreds of thousands of veterans. And they are eager to understand the needs of those who have served, to recognize the warning signs of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, or suicide, and to know where to send them for help.

Nursing leaders have also committed to disseminating effective models for care and to sharing the most up-to-date information on these conditions across academic and practice settings.   By working to expand the body of clinical knowledge in this arena and by partnering with other health care providers and institutions, nursing leaders across the country will continue to advance high quality treatment for these conditions in every community.

Key Commitments Include:

American Nurses Association (ANA): Commits to reaching 3.1 million registered nurses in America by 2015 to raise awareness of PTSD, TBI and depression among veterans, military service members, and their families.  The ANA is coordinating a major campaign involving over 150 nursing organizations that will reach millions of nurses on health issues relevant to veterans and their families. Partnering organizations include the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, American Organization of Nurse Executives, American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, American Psychiatric Nurses Association, American Association of Neuroscience Nurses, Association of Rehabilitation Nurses, the National League of Nurses, federal nurses of the military and public health services, and the Department of Veterans Affairs. Together with these partnering organizations, ANA will:

·        Educate America’s future nurses to care for our nation’s veterans, service members, and their families facing post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, depression, and other clinical issues;

·        Enrich nursing education to ensure that current and future nurses are educated and trained in the unique clinical challenges and best practices associated with caring for military service members, veterans, and their families;

·        Disseminate the most up-to-date information as it relates to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and psychological health conditions, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD);

·        Grow the body of knowledge leading to improvements in health care and wellness for our military service members, veterans, and their families; and

·        Lead and advance the supportive community of nurses, institutions, and health care providers dedicated to improving the health of military service members, veterans, and their families.

American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP): AANP represents the interests of the more than 148,000 Nurse Practitioners across the country. It has reached out to its members through the creation of a unique Joining Forces section of their website, contacted all Nurse Practitioners and nursing organizations that are AANP group members to ask for their pledge in support of Joining Forces, asked state representatives to contact organizations in their state to render support, committed to publishing a special edition on veterans health in their journal, provided workshops to promote the wellness of veterans and caregivers at its conference, created continuing education programs focusing on issues facing veterans and military families, highlighted veterans’ health during Nurse Practitioners week, and supported research on veterans’ health through their foundation.  AANP has formed an ad hoc committee, composed of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense leaders, to focus on promoting this initiative.

American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN): is making veteran health a priority issue through 2014 and beyond.  AACN is committed to working with the nation’s schools of nursing to promote curriculum integration, faculty development, and student clinical experiences focused on enhancing the care of veterans, service members, and their families. Building on its long history of raising curriculum standards and enhancing quality in nursing care, AACN will identify and showcase best practices in nursing education and disseminate information on curricular models to all schools of nursing through Webinars, conference programming, and our online Collaboration Community. In honor of National Nurses Week scheduled for May 6-12, 2012, AACN is offering a free Webinar series to commence work to support Joining Forces available at http://www.aacn.nche.edu/webinars.  Reflecting the theme of “Educating Future Nurses to Care for Veterans,” three individual Webinars are planned, including a showcase of the innovative work underway at several VA Nursing Academy sites related to veteran care and faculty development; a panel discussion on creative curriculum approaches to caring for veterans; and a special session on meeting the palliative care needs of veterans, which outlines AACN’s work with the City of Hope on the groundbreaking ELNEC-For Veterans initiative.

 

The American Psychiatric Nurses Association (APNA): is committed to providing support to veterans and their families by providing educational resources to its more than 7,800 members as well as to all nurses across the country. APNA has created a website, www.apna.org/military that serves as a portal to a wide variety of information on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The APNA Annual Conference and its Annual Clinical Psychopharmacology Institute, which together are attended by more than 1,500 nurses annually, will include sections dedicated to mental health issues that are military related. These courses will be converted to podcasts and made available via the APNA eLearning Center which can be viewed or downloaded from the APNA website.

Nursing Organizations

Over 150 state and national nursing organizations have committed to the following:

·         Educating America’s nurses to care for our nation’s veterans, service members, and their families facing post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, depression, and other clinical issues;

·         Enriching nursing education to ensure that current and future nurses are educated and trained in the unique clinical challenges and best practices associated with caring for military service members, veterans, and their families;

·         Disseminating the most up-to-date information as it relates to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and psychological health conditions, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD);

·         Growing the body of knowledge leading to improvements in health care and wellness for our military service members, veterans, and their families; and

·         Leading and advancing the supportive community of nurses, institutions, and health care providers dedicated to improving the health of military service members, veterans, and their families.

Nursing School Commitment

Over 500 nursing schools in all 50 states, DC, and Puerto Rico have committed by 2014 to:

·         Educating America’s future nurses to care for our nation’s veterans, service members, and their families facing post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, depression, and other clinical issues;

·         Enriching nursing education to ensure that current and future nurses are trained in the unique clinical challenges and best practices associated with caring for military service members, veterans, and their families;

·         Integrating content that addresses the unique health and wellness challenges of our nation’s service members, veterans, and their families into nursing curricula;

·         Sharing teaching resources and applying best practices in the care of service members, veterans, and their families;

·         Growing the body of knowledge leading to improvements in health care and wellness for our service members, veterans, and their families; and

·         Joining with others to further strengthen the supportive community of nurses, institutions, and healthcare providers dedicated to improving the health of service members, veterans, and their families.

About Pace University: For 105 years, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

About Pace University’s College of Health Professions: The College of Health Professions was established in 2010 in an effort to integrate the broad range of health science majors at Pace University. The College is made up of the Lienhard School of Nursing and the Pace University-Lenox Hill Hospital Physician Assistant Studies Program. The College’s vision is innovative leadership in education, practice, and scholarship for the health professions, and its mission is to educate and challenge students for the health professions to be innovators and leaders who will positively impact global health care.

ArtDaily.org: Pace University art professor awarded grant to research link between augmented reality and viewer response

Art Daily ran the press release on Pace art professor Will Pappenheimer’s recent grant award to explore the apparent link of virtual objects with viewer response, via wearable devices designed to interpret the sensory input of the audience to control and create “augmented reality” objects and information.

Art Daily and Computer Graphics World ran stories on Pace art professor Will Pappenheimer’s recent grant award.

From ArtDaily.org:

Will Pappenheimer, associate professor of art at Pace University, and a founding member of the artist collective, Manifest.AR, have recently been awarded the ARtSENSE Commission at The Foundation for Creative Technology (FACT) in Liverpool, England for their proposal entitled ‘Invisible ARtaffects.’ Invisible ARtaffects will explore the apparent link of virtual objects with viewer response, via wearable devices designed to interpret the sensory input of the audience to control and create “augmented reality” objects and information. The goal is for the exhibitions to create an experience of virtual art which is responsive to viewers. The virtual affects the real, which in turn affects the virtual. Researchers will include artists from Manifest.AR, the ARtSENSE Consortium of European organizations, and FACT working in collaboration, culminating in a significant exhibition in 2013 at the FACT building. Manifest.AR is also planning to extend their explorations with exhibits within the Liverpool community. Pappenheimer and Manifest.AR were awarded the $32,000 grant for artists’ fees, production costs and travel costs while continuing research and production of this proposal.More Information: http://www.artdaily.org/index.asp?int_sec=2&int_new=54627[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org

Pace University art professor awarded grant to research link between augmented reality and viewer response.

The Journal News: Teachers-in-training go Digital at Pace

Pace is one of 10 universities in the country that are putting its students in front of digital classes connected to the “Teach Live” laboratory at the University of Central Florida in Orlando.

Gary Stern from The Journal News visited Pace teacher education classes to learn about and report on a new teaching tool – avatars in a new program, TeachLivE.

From the article in The Journal News:

Until recently, teachers-in-training at Pace University in Pleasantville did not get to step in front of a class until their senior year. They learned the theories behind curriculum and instruction without having to face the unpredictable and sometimes unruly element of classroom life: students.

But recently, 19-year-old sophomore Charles Link got up in front of a small class of jumpy and easily distracted seventh-graders to teach a basic lesson on the states of matter. When he explained how boiling water turns to steam or gas, the class giggled.

“When you said gas, I was just doing a demonstration,” one student, Marcus, said. More chuckles.

Link ignored the remark — as so many middle-school teachers have before him — and went on with his lesson. It was a taste of the real world for him, even though his students were not of flesh and blood.

They were avatars.

Pace is one of 10 universities in the country that are putting its students in front of digital classes connected to the “Teach Live” laboratory at the University of Central Florida in Orlando.

Education majors at Pace teach to five digital avatars who appear on an interactive board and are controlled and voiced by actors in Orlando wearing “motion capture” suits, not unlike those used to create digital movie characters. The avatars — Marcus, Maria, Vince, Francis and never-stop-talking Monique — have distinct personalities that are supposed to represent real adolescent behaviors.

Read the rest of the article at lohud.com.

The Journal News: Japanese Students Tour Hospital

Japanese medical students visiting as part of a Pace University English language program got a tour of Hudson Valley Hospital Center and spoke to one of its top doctors, a native of Japan.

The Northern Westchester blog on The Journal News web site, www.lohud.com, ran a write-up of international students who spent a week with Pace’s English Language Institute and the College of Health Professions and toured local health care facilities.

What follows is a an article from The Journal News about one such tour:

The sound of Japanese has been heard in the hallways of Hudson Valley Hospital Center in Cortlandt.

Japanese medical students visiting as part of a Pace University English language program got a tour of Hudson Valley Hospital Center and spoke to one of its top doctors, a native of Japan.

Nine students from the Pace-Kanawaza University pre-clerkship program visited the Hospital on March 23 and had a 30-minute interview with Dr. Roy Ashikari of the Ashikari Breast Center. Dr. Ashikari, a renowned breast cancer surgeon, came to the United States from Japan more than 50 years ago.

Dr. Ashikari told the students that he has practiced at many major hospitals, but that the day to day medical treatment which is so important to patients goes on at smaller community hospitals like Hudson Valley Hospital Center. He added that he “loves New York” and “there is no where else like it.”

Brian Hickey, Director of the English Language Institute and an advisor to the Kanawaza program, said the one-week program is aimed at improving the students’ medical English and at exposing them to medicine in the United States. Hickey said that the 4th and 5th year medical students are training to work in rural areas of Japan.

Read the rest of the article here.

NEWS RELEASE: Ask a Question; Save a Life. Pace University Receives Grant for Online Training of Faculty and Staff in Suicide Prevention

QPR (Question, Persuade, Refer) is a nationally recognized suicide prevention program designed to educate persons to recognize and respond to the signs of suicidal thinking or behavior. Research has shown that those who ultimately attempt suicide often provide numerous direct or indirect clues as to their intentions. Contact Dr. Richard Shadick at shadick@pace.edu or 212-346-1526 to sign up for online training and learn how you can save a life.

Pace University Receives Grant for Online Training of Faculty and Staff in Suicide Prevention;  Gatekeeper Approach Strengthens “Community Connectedness” to Detect and Treat At-Risk Individuals

 – Suicide is the third leading cause of death for 15-24 year olds –

NEW YORK, NY, March 21, 2012 – Pace University’s Counseling Center, New York City campus, has received a one-time, $6,000 mini-grant from the QPR Institute for the implementation of a local online suicide prevention training program.

“Suicide remains the third leading cause of death among the 15-24 year old age group, of which most college students fall within,” said Richard Shadick, Ph.D., Director of Pace’s Counseling Center in New York City and an adjunct Professor of Psychology.Stigma of mental health services can prevent students from getting the attention they need.  Seventy-five percent of students who die by suicide never come for counseling.  While suicide is one of the most preventable forms of death, doing so is quite complex.  Pace will use this grant to train faculty and staff in a simple gatekeeper procedure that follows CPR and can save lives.”

QPR involves these three simple steps:

  • Question … a person about suicide
  • Persuade … the person to get help
  • Refer …the person to the appropriate resource

To date, more than one million Americans have been trained in the QPR Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention program. QPR (Question, Persuade, Refer) is an evidence-based, Suicide Prevention Resource Center/American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (SPRC/AFSP) registered “best practice” program taught in classrooms by more than 5,000 Certified Instructors throughout the U.S. and abroad.

Ask a Question; Save a Life 

“What can be done to help individuals who are suicidal? Knowing the warning signs and symptoms of suicide can help,” advised Dr. Shadick. ”Suicidal individuals can be depressed, hopeless, angry, or socially isolated. They often have difficulty with sleeping or eating and demonstrate obvious changes in their appearance. Students who are suicidal have significant academic or financial problems or experience a significant loss, such as a relationship break up, divorce, or move. Suicidal individuals also talk about dying-either indirectly, such as saying that they want to end their pain or make it all go away, or directly, such as stating that they want to kill themselves. Students whom have attempted to kill themselves in the past are particularly at risk for future suicide death. Finally, with college students a significant proportion of suicides involve drug or alcohol use.”

QPR’s online suicide prevention program “gatekeeper” training takes about an hour.  A gatekeeper is someone who knows the basics about suicide and intervention skills, believes that suicide can be prevented and can assist in the aftermath of suicide.  The three formal goals of the program are:

  • Goal 1: Build community capacity to prevent suicide by strengthening community connectedness through gatekeeper training designed to detect and treat at-risk persons before a suicide attempt or completion occurs.
  • Goal 2: Reduce the frequency and base rates of suicide attempts and completions in communities experiencing increasing and high rates of suicide events (attempts and fatalities).
  • Goal 3: Establish sustainable suicide prevention programming and staff infrastructure at the community level through a public-private partnership. 

If someone is talking about killing themselves or is experiencing some of these symptoms, it is essential to intervene,” added Dr. Shadick.  “One should listen without judgment and acknowledge the pain they are suffering. Even if they downplay their symptoms, one should take them seriously. It is essential to get them to a psychologist quickly. Sometimes a college student may feel that there is a stigma connected to going to a campus counseling center. One should let them know that the counseling center is another form of academic support just like a writing center or tutoring service and that many students go to these centers for a wide variety of concerns, not because they are mentally ill.”

Members of the Pace Community who are interested in participating in the QPR Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention program should contact Dr. Shadick directly at rshadick@pace.edu, 212-346-1526.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media Contact: Samuella Becker, sbecker2@pace.edu, 212-346-1637 or 917-734-5172 

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NEWS RELEASE: Pace University Art Professor Awarded Grant to Research Link Between Augmented Reality and Viewer Response

Will Pappenheimer, associate professor of art at Pace University, and a founding member of the artist collective, Manifest.AR, have recently been awarded the ARtSENSE Commission at The Foundation for Creative Technology (FACT) in Liverpool, England for their proposal entitled ‘Invisible ARtaffects.’

Photo editors: This project has good visual elements. Photo opportunities can be arranged upon request.

Virtual reality meets art in newly funded research project

NEW YORK, NY, March 19, 2012 – Will Pappenheimer, associate professor of art at Pace University, and a founding member of the artist collective, Manifest.AR, have recently been awarded the ARtSENSE Commission at The Foundation for Creative Technology (FACT) in Liverpool, England for their proposal entitled ‘Invisible ARtaffects.’

Invisible ARtaffects will explore the apparent link of virtual objects with viewer response, via wearable devices designed to interpret the sensory input of the audience to control and create “augmented reality” objects and information. The goal is for the exhibitions to create an experience of virtual art which is responsive to viewers. The virtual affects the real, which in turn affects the virtual.

Researchers will include artists from Manifest.AR, the ARtSENSE Consortium of European organizations, and FACT working in collaboration, culminating in a significant exhibition in 2013 at the FACT building. Manifest.AR is also planning to extend their explorations with exhibits within the Liverpool community.

Pappenheimer and Manifest.AR were awarded the $32,000 grant for artists’ fees, production costs and travel costs while continuing research and production of this proposal.

Projects they are proposing are visualized in these pictures:

“FACT Sky Museum,” a virtual museum of skywriting created by FACT museum visitors, by Will Pappenheimer: http://manifestarblog.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/fact-sky-museum2.jpg

“Biomer Skelters,”  a virtual jungle forest generator, Will Pappenheimer and Tamiko Thiel: http://manifestarblog.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/forrestation-viz-1.jpg

About Will Pappenheimer

Will Pappenheimer is an artist and professor at Pace University in New York as well as a founding member of the Manifest.AR collective. His work has appeared in solo and group exhibitions nationally and internationally. One notable installation was his public mood ring in Tampa, FL, a combined Internet and spatial piece of artwork which allowed a large online community to display the emotional condition of public opinion and news stories during Super Bowl 2009 in colors in a public sculpture. His grants include an NEA Artist Fellowship; Traveling Scholars Award from School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Turbulence.org; Rhizome.org at the New Museum; and a large scale public network sculpture for the City of Tampa. His work with Manifest.AR has been reviewed in a variety of media, including New York Times, the Boston Globe, WIRED, NY Arts International, Art US, and MSNBC.com. For a complete list of his recent projects visit http://www.willpap-projects.com.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

The Journal News: Concordia and Pace to Offer ‘Fast Track’

Concordia College has announced a new articulation agreement with the Pace Lubin School of Business, offering students a fast track to earning their master’s degree in accounting.

Concordia College recently announced a new articulation agreement with the Pace Lubin School of Business, offering students a “fast track” to receiving their master’s degree in accounting. Students who graduate from Concordia with a B.S. in business administration, specializing in accounting, will be able to attend Pace and obtain their M.S. in accounting/CPA preparation. Depending on the students’ grades and credits earned, the program could be completed in as few as 32 credits instead of 51.

From lohud.com. Additional information at The Journal News.