NEWS RELEASE: Premiere of “Battle Behind the Bottle: A Documentary on the Cork Question”

The premiere screening of Batttle Behind the Bottle: A Documentary on the Cork Question” will be Wednesday, May 2 at 7:30pm, Pace University, 861 Bedford Rd., Pleasantville, entrance 1, Willcox Hall auditorium. The student filmmakers and their professor Maria Luskay will hold a panel discussion on the making of the film.

PREMIERE OF “BATTLE BEHIND THE BOTTLE: A DOCUMENTARY ON THE CORK QUESTION”

Meet student filmmakers at the public premiere Wednesday, May 2 at 7:30pm, Pace University, 861 Bedford Rd., Pleasantville, entrance 1, Willcox Hall auditorium

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, April 27, 2012 – In a new documentary, “Battle Behind the Bottle: A Documentary on the Cork Question, ” a team of Pace University student filmmakers explores “the connection between the bottle of wine on your table and the fate of faraway forests.”

The premiere screening will be Wednesday, May 2 at 7:30pm, Pace University, 861 Bedford Rd., Pleasantville, entrance 1, Willcox Hall auditorium. The student filmmakers and their professor Maria Luskay will hold a panel discussion on the making of the film. New York Times Dot Earth blogger Andrew Revkin, Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, who co-taught the course, will join by videoconference. The event is free and open to the public. Media admission by press pass.

In the film students in the award-winning Pace course “Producing the Documentary” highlight the unseen issues within the cork industry in Portugal. The film makes the connection between cork harvested for wine bottles, a source of livelihood for 100,000 people, and the forests that are repositories for wildlife across Southern Europe and parts of North Africa. The students wrote, filmed and produced the entire project, traveling to Porto, Coruche and Lisbon to research and film.

In the documentary course, created nine years ago by Pace communications professor Maria Luskay, Ph.D., Program Chair of the Master of Arts in Media and Communication Arts, a mix of graduate and undergraduate students produce a short film each spring, spending January and February reporting and planning the shoot – which consumes much of their March spring “break” — and then editing and producing the final product. In past years Luskay has taken students to the Netherlands, Nassau, Brazil, Costa Rica, and Tuscany, and elsewhere to produce films.

“Each of these documentary projects presents unique challenges, said Luskay speaking of past film projects. “We think we know what we’re going to shoot and the direction that the film is going to take, but what actually happens once we get there can be entirely different. Agility is needed to stay true to the original theme but remain open to what the reality is. This gives the students real-world experience in documentary film-making that will serve them well in their careers.”

For interviews with the student filmmakers, Luskay or Revkin, contact Cara Cea in the Pace office of public information, ccea@pace.edu, (914) 906-9680. The making of the film is detailed on the students’ blog. Follow the students on Twitter @PaceCork and on Facebook.

Previous documentaries the course has produced and corresponding awards and links:

The Pace Master Plan for Pleasantville

Linda Thornton: Seeking Sustainability, One Shrimp at a Time, 2011, Best Shorts Competition for Best Short Documentary Award of Merit.

The Life of an American Ambassador, 2009 – recipient of Best in Category Award Winner for the “Documentary” category of the 2010 Indie Short Film Competition

Social Media:  Redefining Communication, 2008

Mugello: One Step Closer to Sustainability, 2007

Mugello, Italy’s Untapped Gem, 2007

The Constitution Comes Alive, a documentary for Constitution Day, 2007

Ecotourism: The Double Edged Sword, 2006

The March of Time, the History of Pace University, 2006, North Castle Community Television, Best Documentary Winner

For more information visit the Pace media and communications department web site at www.pace.edu/dyson/mediacomm.

About Pace University

For 105 years, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact: Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu, 914-906-9680

The Journal News, News 12 and The Daily Pleasantville: Pleasantville’s Pace Gets Solar Classroom

Pace unveiled its new solar classroom, funded by Con Edison, and The Journal News, News 12 and The Daily Pleasantville reported on the event. (Left: Angelo Spillo, director of the Environmental Center at Pace, addresses the crowd at Thursday’s solar panel unveiling. Photo credit: Brian Marschhauser)

Pace unveiled its new solar classroom, thanks in part to a grant from Con Edison, and The Journal News, News 12, The Daily Pleasantville and Patch.com reported on the event.

From The Daily Pleasantville:

Sunny skies aptly shined down on the Pace University campus Thursday afternoon as its Environmental Center celebrated the opening of its new solar-powered classroom.

“Can you feel the electricity being made?” said Angelo Spillo, director of the Environmental Center.

The panels were funded by Con Edison, which awarded Pace with a $15,000 grant as part of its effort to expand solar development in New York. A similar initiative was also signed into action by Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Thursday.

“A lot of times we have so much dialogue and you see much going on back and forth as far as solar industry and solar power at this point,” said County Legislator Michael Smith. “A lot of what you read is just the talk. This is the doing, and we need more doing and we need less talk.”

While the solar panels will help the center save money on its electrical bill, Spillo said that was not the motivation behind its installation. The equipment will instead be used as a teaching tool.

“One of the things we wanted to do was keep this equipment visible,” Spillo said. “If you were doing it in a home, you would want to hide it, you would want to put it in the basement, it’s kind of unsightly. In our case, we want our students to see it.”

Helping to design the conversion was William Misicka, a senior student in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences’ Environmental Studies Program at Pace. Misicka performed research on solar energy and went on a solar site survey with a contracting company.

“This is a virus, it’s a good virus, and this is how it spreads. Congratulations to Pace on your accomplishment,” said Smith. “Let the sun shine.”

From The Journal News:

“The university opened its solar classroom – a former cottage that now has solar panels on the roof – this afternoon (Wednesday). Con Edison supported the project as part of its commitment to promoting education and environmental awareness in Westchester County and New York City.

“The solar classroom at Pace University will help us spread our message about the environmental and economic benefits of solar power,” said Frances A. Resheske, Con Edison’s senior vice president for Public Affairs. “The incentives government agencies are offering make this a great time for customers to consider whether they can cut their energy bills by using solar energy.”

The Con Edison grant allowed Pace to add solar panels to a building in its Environmental Center. The panels provide 1.5 kilowatts of electricity to the building.

Hundreds of Pace students and visitors use the classroom each year. The university plans to use the classroom to show that solar power can be a viable alternative to fossil fuels.

William Misicka, a student in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences’ Environmental Studies program, designed the conversion.”

via Carmel student helps Pace get a solar classroom | Northern Westchester.

The Pleasantville Examiner: Fracking Debate Highlighted at Pace University Forums | The Examiner News

The Pleasantville Examiner ran a feature story covering two related Earth Month events at Pace. Both events explored a controversial environmental issue – hydro-fracking. The first event, entitled WTF? (What the Frac?), was a neutral debate with energy experts. The second event was a session with community groups decidedly against fracking.

The Pleasantville Examiner ran a feature story covering two related Earth Month events at Pace. Both events explored a controversial environmental issue – hydro-fracking. The first event, entitled WTF? (What the Frac?) organized by the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, was a neutral debate with energy experts. The second event, organized by Dyson professor Fran Delahanty, was a session with community groups decidedly against fracking.

From The Pleasantville Examiner:

The hot-button issue of vertical hydraulic fracturing to extract natural gas in the upstate Marcellus Shale may be stalled in moratorium, but that didn’t stop Pace University from hosting two separate forums on the issue last week.

On April 9, energy and environmental leaders gathered at the Pleasantville and New York City campuses and were linked by video conference to address issues such as the science, economics, regulations, ethics and environmental consequences of the practice.

The following afternoon, fracking opponents listened to a panel of three experts at Pace’s Kessel Student Center in Pleasantville who explored strategies to accelerate the development of alternative energy and to ban fracking. That event was organized by the Pleasantville-based WESPAC Foundation.

The panelists addressed the health and economic impacts of fracking and expressed concern that if the energy industry is allowed to drill upstate it could delay efforts to encourage development of alternative sources.

“Energy independence does not mean substituting Middle East oil for hydro-fracking for natural gas,” said NYU Clinical Associate Professor of Social Sciences Dr. Lisa DiCaprio, one of Tuesday’s three panelists. “It means looking at alternatives to all fossil fuels.”

Panelist Ellen Weininger, education outreach coordinator for Grassroots Environmental Education,  a non-profit organization that reaches out to citizens about the impacts of environmental exposures, said “public health is the single most important issue” and is the reason why fracking should be banned in New York State.

In Pennsylvania, there have been reports that the drilling contaminated wells and deteriorated air quality caused by the sharp increase in truck traffic. Similar problems could happen in upstate communities, Weininger said.

Ecomonist Dr. Jannette Barth said the energy industry has also misled the public about the economic benefits. She said only about 3.7 jobs are created for every $1 million invested by natural gas companies who engage in fracking as opposed to 9.5 and 9.8 jobs, respectively, for wind and solar.

However, Andrew Revkin, the panel moderator on Monday night in Manhattan and who writes The New York Times DotEarth blog, said the biggest challenge in the fracking debate is getting accurate information to the public. He said so far the issue has been debated by interests “on the fringes,” which ignores valid points on both sides.

Revkin said fracking opponents have wrongly stated that the industry is inherently dangerous and can’t be regulated while some natural gas companies have hurt themselves by taking shortcuts and failing to address all safety issues. He maintained, however, that fracking does not have to imperil the environment.

“There’s a clear path ahead on this,” Revkin said. “There’s a way to regulate this.”

Mark Boling, president of V+ Development Solutions at Southwest Energy, said at the Monday forum that it has been difficult in devising effective regulations in the current environment. With air  emissions, for example, the levels are known but there has been no agreement regarding acceptable levels, he said.

Assemblyman Robert Castelli (R-Goldens Bridge), who attended the WESPAC forum, said there are still too many unknowns regarding the impacts on health and the environment for him to support lifting the ongoing moratorium. He said more research is needed before he would feel safe voting for fracking.

“As far as the moratorium is concerned, I’m quite happy that that moratorium remains in place,” Castelli said. “It can remain in place forever as far as I’m concerned. I’m not naive but certainly it will be dealt with. We still need to study a bit more.”

Dr. Frances Delahanty, who is currently teaching an “Introduction to Peace and Justice” at Pace and helped organize last Tuesday’s event, said there is nothing to convince her yet that fracking can be properly regulated.

“The state is cutting back on regulators and personnel and there are very few regulators and, of course, once (fracking) happens you can’t undo it,” she said.

Fracking Debate Highlighted at Pace University Forums | The Examiner News.

View the pdf of the paper here with the article on page 3.

Patch.com: Pace Brings Relay for Life to Pleasantville | The Daily Pleasantville

The Daily Pleasantville reports that Relay for Life will once again take place on Pace’s Pleasantville campus.

The Daily Pleasantville and Patch.com reports that Relay for Life will once again take place on Pace’s Pleasantville campus.

From The Daily Pleasantville:

An all-night cancer fundraiser will return to Pleasantville, with teams of people walking on the track at Pace University’s Goldstein Fitness Center.

The Relay for Life benefits the American Cancer Society and will run from 6 p.m. to 4 a.m. on Saturday, April 20.

“Just about every person has either been effected by [cancer] or knows someone who has,” said Mayor Peter Scherer.

The relay consists of walking teams that raise money by selling goods or services, holding fundraisers, or receiving donations. For the entire event, each participating team has at least one member walking on the track.

“Most of us don’t stay that whole time period; there are lots of ways to help, including ways to help without going at all,” said Scherer.

The event begins with a lap reserved for cancer survivors and their caregivers. As the sun sets, the track is lit up the with the traditional Luminaria Ceremony, which is marked with hundreds of glowing bags bearing the name of people affected by cancer.

Leading up to the event, Scherer spoke with one of the event’s co-chairs, Chris Alessandro, who is a sophomore at Pace. The interview aired on Pleasantville Cable Television and is available online.

“Turns out that he actually is one of the ringleaders of a similar relay that takes place in Yorktown, where he hails from,” said Scherer. “Chris is a great and lively young man. It is a great example of the kinds of programs Pace is running and seeking to engage the Pleasantville community in.”

Pace Brings Relay for Life to Pleasantville | The Daily Pleasantville.

The Daily Tarrytown: Pace SAAC Raises Money for Make-A-Wish With Bingo

Pace University’s Student Athletic Advisory Committee held its sixth annual Bingo Night on Tuesday at Goldstein Health and Fitness Center and raised $2,600 for the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

From The Daily Tarrytown:

Pace University’s Student Athletic Advisory Committee held its sixth annual Bingo Night on Tuesday at Goldstein Health and Fitness Center and raised $2,600 for the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

More than 250 students and staff members took part in the fundraiser for Make-A-Wish, which is the charity of choice for all Division II schools. Lucio’s Pizza and Frank and Joe’s Deli provided free food to those in attendance.

The SAAC’s goal for the 2011-12 academic year is to raise $8,000, and Tuesday’s event brought the total so far to more than $6,000. This is the most that the SAAC has raised for Make-A-Wish in the history of Pace University.

The committee will be active in the next few weeks with community service events. If you are wondering what bingo we are talking about, have a look at the list of bingo sites from here. The SAAC will travel to the Bedford Road School on Saturday to assist the Pleasantville PTA in planting flowers in the courtyard of the school.

When Pace’s softball team hosts Bentley University on Sunday, the SAAC will launch the “Pace Goes Pink” breast cancer campaign for the spring season. Lacrosse will go pink on April 10, when the Setters host Adelphi University, while baseball will do so on April 22 against Assumption College.

The SAAC will participate in Relay for Life at Goldstein Fitness Center on April 20 and 21 and will host developmentally disabled children at a Pace baseball game on April 25.

Earlier this year, the committee partnered with Colleges Against Cancer and raised more than $2,500 for the Dickson Cancer Treatment Center in White Plains.

Read the original article here: Pace SAAC Raises Money for Make-A-Wish With Bingo | The Daily Tarrytown.

NEWS ADVISORY: Pace Presents The Good Life – Your Guide to Living a Life You Love

The first event in the Pace University spring lecture series will be “The Good Life: Your Guide to Living a Life You Love,” a panel discussion on Thursday, March 8, 6:30pm – 8:30pm on Pace’s Pleasantville campus

Panel discussion March 8 at 6:30pm at Pace University Kessel Student Center, Pleasantville Campus

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, February 29, 2012 – What’s the secret to sustaining balance in a fast-moving society? What defines a “Good Life” and how do we get it?

These questions will be explored at the first event in the Pace University spring lecture series. “The Good Life: Your Guide to Living a Life You Love” will be a panel discussion on Thursday, March 8, 6:30pm – 8:30pm on Pace’s Pleasantville campus in the Gottesman room of the Kessel Student Center, 861 Bedford Rd., entrance 3. The event is free and open to the public. Media admission by press pass.

The panel discussion will be led by faculty member Ross Robak, Ph.D., chair of psychology and mental health counseling and director of the Master of Counseling program for Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace. Robak will be joined by Pace psychology professors Anthony Mancini, Ph.D., and Paul Griffin, Ph.D.; Susan L. Maxam, University Director for Student Success from the Center for Academic Excellence at Pace; and financial expert Rosario Girasa, J.D., of Pace’s Lubin School of Business.

The evening’s panel discussion and Q&A will examine how to build a healthy, happy life – spiritually, mentally, physically and financially. The panel will explore society’s tendency toward increasingly busy lives made more complex by relationships, career ambitions, financial obligations and even technology. Technology allows for constant communication but comes with the burden of not being able to detach.

To RSVP, e-mail PaceCounseling@Pace.edu.

Future lectures in the spring series will include an Earth Month event in April on wildlife in Westchester and one in May on a documentary film, produced by Pace students, on the cork industry.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

The Daily Pleasantville: Pace Athletics Names Eleventh Hall of Fame Class

The Pace University Department of Athletics named the five newest members of the Pace Athletics Hall of Fame.

The Pace University Department of Athletics named the five newest members of the Pace Athletics Hall of Fame.

Dennis Carpenter (football ’75), Katie Holden (softball ’01), Wanda Maynard-Morris (women’s basketball ’02), Marcus Mayus (lacrosse ’00) and Bob Scheinblum (men’s basketball ’61) make up the eleventh class in the history of Pace’s Hall of Fame and will be inducted with a ceremony on Tuesday, April 10 at 6 p.m. at the Tudor Room of Pace’s White Plains campus.

Carpenter was Pace’s quarterback from 1969 to 1974. He led the nation in total offense in his freshmen year, in which Pace won the Metropolitan Bowl. He earned MVP honors in both that game and the regular season. In his junior year, he led Pace’s top-ranked offense in terms of yardage. He led Pace to another win at the Metropolitan Bowl in his senior year. Carpenter was a teacher in Katonah from 1977 to 2005.

Holden was a four-time Northeast-10 All-Conference selection from 1998 to 2001 and a three-time member of the ECAC Division-II North All-Star Team. She made the CoSIDA Academic All-District team in her junior year and won the Woody Hayes Scholar-Athlete Award. She was Pace’s Letterwinner of the Year in her senior season. She now works as an attorney.

Maynard-Morris played from 1998 to 2002 and earned Northeast-10 All-Conference honors three times, along with ECAC All-Star Honors and Met Writers Association All-Star Honors. She was Pace’s Female Athlete of the Year in her junior season, in which she led Pace to the Elite Eight. She was the Pace Letterwinner of the Year and ECAC Player of the Year in her senior season. She is only the second player in Northeast-10 Conference history to be named Player of the Year and Defensive Player of the Year in the same season.

Mayus played lacrosse at Pace from 1996 to 1999. He earned Knickerbocker All-Conference honors in his freshman year and was Pace Athlete of the Year in his junior season. He was selected as Division II All-American and Northeast-10 All-Conference twice in his junior and senior years and earned Northeast-10 Player of the Year honors in his senior year. He now works as a doctor of internal medicine in Cos Cob, Conn.

Scheinblum was on the men’s basketball team from 1958 to 1961 and also played baseball at Pace. He was the captain of the basketball team in his senior year and was Pace Athlete of the Year. He graduated as Pace’s all-time leading scorer. He went on to be a lieutenant colonel in the United States Marine Corps and flew in 297 combat missions in Vietnam from 1967 to 1978. He won a gold medal and bronze medal at the Arkansas State Invitational Senior Olympics in 2000 and 2001, respectively, and averaged 20 points per game. He averaged 15 points per game in the 2001 National Senior Olympics. He retired as a captain and instructor for Delta Airlines in October 1999 and today volunteers as a pilot for Mercy MedFlight, a charitable air ambulance service.

Tickets for the event are $100 and are available here. 

From a report by Pace University Athletics/John M. Tagliaferri

Pace Athletics Names Eleventh Hall of Fame Class | The Daily Pleasantville.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University’s Center for Literacy Enrichment Marks 40th Anniversary

Long before commercial tutoring centers, Pace University’s Center for Literacy Enrichment in White Plains, NY offered affordable literacy instruction to students of all ages. This year marks the 40th anniversary of the Center.

Center will celebrate with award dinner April 19; Scholastic CEO Richard Robinson to be keynote

WHITE PLAINS, NY, February 15, 2012 – Long before commercial tutoring centers, Pace University’s Center for Literacy Enrichment in White Plains, NY offered affordable literacy instruction to students of all ages. This year marks the 40th anniversary of the Center with a director and founder— Sr. St. John Delany, Ph.D.—who is nearly 90.

Delany taught first grade in White Plains from 1941 to 1972 before founding the Center and becoming an Associate Professor in the School of Education at Pace University.  Former students include U.S. Poet Laureate (2004-2006) Billy Collins and Examiner Media’s Pat Casey.

“It has been my privilege to work with children and families over the years…to see them develop a love of reading.  We look at each child as an individual, plan for that student, and encourage that child to perform to his or her optimal level.”

The Center will recognize Delany’s legacy of literacy with an award dinner at the Women’s Club of White Plains, 305 Ridgeway, White Plains, NY 10605, 914-948-0958, www.womansclubofwhiteplains.org.  The dinner will take place on Thursday, April 19th from 6:00 – 9:00pm and will feature Scholastic Chairman, President and CEO Richard Robinson as keynote.  He will be honored for his vision and commitment to global literacy and the creation of Scholastic’s “Reading Bill of Rights.” Scholastic, known for its school book clubs, book fairs and Scholastic News, is also the company behind beloved brands that include Harry Potter®, Clifford the Big Red Dog ®, Goosebumps ® and I SPY®.  Robinson has been Chief Executive Officer​ of Scholastic since 1975.

Tickets are $125. The fundraising event will also feature a silent auction and harp music.  Proceeds will help the Center expand programs and reach more students. To reserve seats or purchase an ad in the Souvenir Journal, call the Center for Literacy Enrichment at (914) 422-4135.

About the Center for Literacy Enrichment

The Center for Literacy Enrichment, part of the School of Education at Pace, is housed on Pace University’s Law School campus in White Plains. The Center is staffed by trained literacy tutors, many of whom are enrolled in the Masters in Literacy Program at Pace.  The Center serves a broad range of students from diverse socio-economic and cultural backgrounds.  Instruction to improve reading skills is provided in small groups or private sessions to K-12 students – both U.S. and foreign-born. The Center takes a skills-based approach with an emphasis on literature.

About Scholastic

Scholastic Corporation (NASDAQ: SCHL) is the world’s largest publisher and distributor of children’s books and a leader in educational technology and related services and children’s media. Scholastic creates quality books, print and technology-based learning materials and programs, magazines, multi-media and other products that help children learn both at school and at home. The Company distributes its products and services worldwide through a variety of channels, including school-based book clubs and book fairs, retail stores, schools, libraries, on-air, and online at www.scholastic.com.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

 

The Journal News and Patch.com: Science Saturdays at Croton-Harmon | Yorktown and Cortlandt region

Pace University and educators in the Croton-Harmon School District are pairing up to offer a special science program for young people in the community. The science seminars are open to students in grades 4 to 8 who are enrolled in the district.

The School of Education at Pace University and educators in the Croton-Harmon School District are pairing up to offer a special science program for young people in the community. The science seminars are open to students in grades 4 to 8 who are enrolled in the district.
The programs will take place in the new science labs at the high school and concentrate on real-world science applications.
The cost for each session is $50, or $180 for all four. All the sessions run from 9 a.m. to 12 noon. Pace University instructors, along with student helpers, will run the labs.
The program offerings:

*Nov. 12: Environmental science Prof. Angelo Spillo will look at the school’s carbon footprint, ways to reduce emissions and sustainable energy consumption.

*Jan. 21: Prof. Gerald Ardito, who also teaches in Croton schools, will run a program on “Physical Computing,” hardware, software, motors, probes and sensors.

*Feb. 18: Prof. Andrew Wier will discuss molecular biology and how microbes can be used to investigate crime scene or spoil food.

*March 17: Prof. Charlene Hoegler will lecture on the “web of life,” how scientists think and order in the natural world.

For more information and registration:

GeraldArdito@chusfd.org. or 914-271-5331.

“There are so many cool things about the Saturday Science Program. We are able to offer a structured extracurricular Science program for our students,” said Ardito, who is teaching one of the Saturday Science classes.” We are making a real, educational connection with educators at Pace University, and taking advantage of our brand new lab facilities.”

Read more here:

Science Saturdays at Croton-Harmon | Yorktown and Cortlandt region.

and the Patch.com article here.

News 12: Psychology professors offer insights into communicating with teens

Pace University psychology professors Jennifer Powell-Lunder and Ross Robak were interviewed for a News 12 segment after they spoke at the Teen Speak event in Pleasantville on November 3 on communicating with teens. (Left: Powell-Lunder).

Pace University psychology professors Jennifer Powell-Lunder and Ross Robak were interviewed for a News 12 segment after they spoke at the Teen Speak event in Pleasantville on November 3 on communicating with teens.

Read the press release here.