The Pleasantville Daily Voice: Pace Exhibit Highlights Artistic Talents Of Faculty And Staff

The Pleasantville Daily Voice published a story about the Choate Gallery art show this month featuring work by Pace faculty and staff members. (Left: A portrait by ITS staff member Fran Megerdichian.)

Fran Megerdichian may spend her days working on information technology projects at Pace University, but when the computers get powered off, the pencils come out and she becomes a pet portraitist.

Megerdichian is just one of the staff and faculty members whose talent is being showcased this month at the Choate Art Gallery on Pace’s Pleasantville campus.

The show, which is free and open to the public, includes paintings, sculpture, photography and ceramics.

It runs through Oct. 5, with a reception on Sept. 18 from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Gallery hours are: Monday through Wednesday, noon to 4 p.m.; Friday, noon to 6 p.m.; and Saturday, noon to 4 p.m.

The gallery is at Pace University, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville, Entrance 3 in Choate House.

Specializing in canine and equine portraits, Megerdichian uses graphite, charcoal, and colored pencil to make the animals come to life.

“I love seeing an image come out through the paper,” she says. “That’s my inspiration.”

What started as a request from someone to draw a dog to surprise her husband for his birthday has now turned into a part-time business.

“People say it’s never too late,” Megerdichian says. “When I picked the pencils up again, I was 43 or 44. They were from third grade. But I picked them up.”

Pace Exhibit Highlights Artistic Talents Of Faculty And Staff | The Pleasantville Daily Voice.

The Pleasantville Daily Voice: Pace University Celebrates 50 Years in Westchester

The Pleasantville Daily Voice reported on the launch of the 50th anniversary celebration with cupcakes available campus-wide on the first day of classes Septemeber 4 in Pleasantville.

The Pleasantville Daily Voice reported on the launch of the 50th anniversary celebration with cupcakes available campus-wide on the first day of classes Septemeber 4 in Pleasantville.

“Pace University kicked off a year-long celebration marking the 50th anniversary of its Pleasantville campus this past Wednesday, the first day of classes for the 2013 fall semester.

Upcoming festivities will include both student-centered and public events. On Sept. 16, a Beatles tribute band will play at the Kessel Student Center at noon to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first day of classes at Pace in Pleasantville.

The first event in a special lecture series will be a panel discussion on telemedicine and the latest trends in healthcare to be held on Oct. 17 at 8 a.m. An anniversary dinner is planned for Oct. 26 as part of Pace’s homecoming weekend.

For more information Pace University’s 50 anniversary of its Pleasantville campus visit its website.”

Read the original article here.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace Media and Communication Arts Students Travel to Mexico to Film Endangered Turtles

¡Viva la Tortuga! Meshing Conservation and Culture in Magdalena Bay, the latest addition to a series of prize-winning short documentaries on sustainable use of the world’s living resources shot by Pace University students and faculty, will premiere at a screening on May 7.

Documentary Film Premiere at Pace University May 7

Pace Media and Communication Arts Students Travel to Mexico to Film Endangered Turtles

PLEASANTVILLE, NY – ¡Viva la Tortuga! Meshing Conservation and Culture in Magdalena Bay, the latest addition to a series of prize-winning short documentaries on sustainable use of the world’s living resources shot by Pace University students and faculty, will premiere at a screening on May 7 at 4 p.m. at Pace University’s Pleasantville campus, 861 Bedford Rd., entrance 1, Willcox Auditorium.

The student filmmakers and their professors will hold a panel discussion on the making of the film. The event is free and open to the public. RSVP is required. Contact Bea Simon at bsimon@pace.edu.  Media admission is by press pass.

This year’s filmmaking team ventured to Magdalena Bay, an 870-square-mile haven for whales, dolphins, sea birds and five species of sea turtles tucked along the Pacific coast of Mexico’s Baja peninsula north of the tourist hub of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. The documentary chronicles how communities that once depended on sea turtle poaching and other extractive activities depleting the region’s rich natural resources are now testing with a new economic model, one built around conservation and sustainable tourism.  The short film provides an intimate portrait of those working to balance economic advancement with environmental protection and striving to create a better life for both the community and the endangered sea turtles.

The documentary was shot, written and edited by a team of 12 students led by Professor Maria Luskay, PhD, program director of the Master of Arts in Media and Communication Arts at Pace University and Senior Fellow Andrew Revkin of the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, who also writes the award-winning Dot Earth blog for The New York Times.

In the documentary course, created 10 years ago by Luskay, a mix of graduate and undergraduate students produce a short film each spring, spending January and February reporting and planning the shoot – which consumes much of their March spring “break” — and then editing and producing the final product. In past years Luskay has taken students to the Netherlands, Portugal, the Bahamas, Brazil, Costa Rica, and Tuscany, and elsewhere to produce films. Previous films can be seen on The New York Times Web site.

For interviews with the student filmmakers, Luskay or Revkin, contact Cara Cea in the Pace office of public information, ccea@pace.edu, (914) 906-9680. The making of the film is detailed on the students’ blog. Follow the students on Twitter @PaceBaja and on Facebook. Click here for the link to information on last year’s documentary and a list of previous films and the awards they have won.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact: Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu, 914-906-9680

Hello Central New York: FIRST Tech Challenge

A segment on Hello Central New York, a local news program that covers the Utica area, covered a FIRST Lego scrimmage and mentioned the upcoming Pace tournament several times.

The Hudson Valley FIRST Tech Challenge (FTC) Robotics Tournament is once again happening at Pace in Pleasantville on Sunday, January 27.

A segment on Hello Central New York, a local news program that covers the Utica area, covered a FIRST Lego scrimmage and mentioned the Pace tournament several times. 

View the segment here.

Patch.com: Pace Students Talk Presidential Debate

Patch.com reporter Sarah Studley came to Pace’s Pleasantville campus to watch the second 2012 Presidential debate with Pace students and faculty.

Patch.com reporter Sarah Studley came to Pace’s Pleasantville campus to watch the second 2012 Presidential debate with Pace students and faculty.

Her interviews with students as well as commentary from political science professor Greg Julian can be found here:

http://tarrytown.patch.com/articles/pace-students-talk-pres-debate-video#video-11753067

From Patch.com:

There was Big Bird. Then there was “malarky.” And now there are “binders full of women.”

While these comical word choices for the presidential and vice presidential candidates have been making headlines over the past few weeks leading up to the November debate, Pace University students in Pleasantville were more concerned with divisive issues Tuesday night.

While tuning into the Hofstra University Town Hall style presidential debate, students and faculty at the campus laughed at some of President Barack Obama’s retorts, “Ooohed” at Mitt Romney’s attacks and took a critical look at the debate as a whole.

Following the just over hour-and-a-half long exchange, moderated by CNN’s Candy Crowley, Pace students dissected the candidates’ responses and strategies.

The two candidates will meet a final time before the November 6 election on Monday, Oct. 22.

The last Presidential debate watch party was covered by Scott Salotto from WABC news radio/Imus in the Morning.

Westchester.com: When Carnivores Become Neighbors Discussion

Westchester.com posted a story on Pace’s upcoming roundtable discussion, “When Carnivores Become Neighbors.”

Westchester.com listed information on the upcoming roundtable discussion, “When Carnivores Become Neighbors.”

From Westchester.com:

With bobcat, coyote and mountain lion sightings around Westchester County making headlines, the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies will hold a public roundtable discussion at Pace University in Pleasantville Thursday, Oct. 11 at 6:30p.m. on carnivore movement, impacts, and policy.

Environmental experts will discuss ways to balance carnivore and suburban human populations, exploring the ecological and social implications of “re-wilding” Westchester that has come about with changing landscapes and the adaptation of carnivores. The panel will consist of Conrad Reining, the Eastern Program Director of the Wildlands Network, and Pace professors Melissa Grigione, professor of biology and director of the environmental science graduate program; David Cassuto, environmental and animal law professor; and Michelle Land, professor of environmental policy and director of the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies.

Carnivores play an essential role in a balanced ecosystem and they provide us with an opportunity to preserve many of the remaining intact forests and open lands in North America. Carnivores also regulate “pest” species, such as rodents and help keep deer populations in check thereby reducing car collisions and Lyme Disease. Grigione and her students research and track carnivores to determine numbers and their migration patterns. She has been called upon by news media in recent years after sightings to share expertise gleaned from years of field research, often reassuring that humans are not in danger. Grigione adds, “In addition to their importance in the ecosystem, carnivores allow us to appreciate true wildness because many of the carnivore species will never fully cohabitate with humans.”

DETAILS:

WHAT: “When Carnivores Become Neighbors,” a roundtable discussion on living near carnivores

WHEN: Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012, 6:30p.m. – 8:30p.m.

WHERE: Pace University, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville, NY, entrance 3, Kessel Student Center, Gottesman Room.

WHO: Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies www.pace.edu/paaes/wildlife-westchester.

This event is free and open to the public. RSVP paceacademy@pace.edu.

View the press release on the event here.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University Presents a Public Forum on Living with Carnivore Wildlife in Westchester

With bobcat, coyote and mountain lion sightings around Westchester County making headlines, the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies will hold a public roundtable discussion at Pace University in Pleasantville Thursday, Oct. 11 at 6:30p.m. on carnivore movement, impacts, and policy.

Pace University Presents a Public Forum on Living with Carnivore Wildlife in Westchester

Environmental experts will discuss the ecological and social implications of the “re-wilding” of Westchester in a roundtable discussion, “When Carnivores Become Neighbors”

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, Oct. 5, 2012 – With bobcat, coyote and mountain lion sightings around Westchester County making headlines, the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies will hold a public roundtable discussion at Pace University in Pleasantville Thursday, Oct. 11 at 6:30p.m. on carnivore movement, impacts, and policy.

Environmental experts will discuss ways to balance carnivore and suburban human populations, exploring the ecological and social implications of “re-wilding” Westchester that has come about with changing landscapes and the adaptation of carnivores. The panel will consist of Conrad Reining, the Eastern Program Director of the Wildlands Network, and Pace professors Melissa Grigione, professor of biology and director of the environmental science graduate program; David Cassuto, environmental and animal law professor; and Michelle Land, professor of environmental policy and director of the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies.

Carnivores play an essential role in a balanced ecosystem and they provide us with an opportunity to preserve many of the remaining intact forests and open lands in North America.  Carnivores also regulate “pest” species, such as rodents and help keep deer populations in check thereby reducing car collisions and Lyme Disease.  Grigione and her students research and track carnivores to determine numbers and their migration patterns. She has been called upon by news media in recent years after sightings to share expertise gleaned from years of field research, often reassuring that humans are not in danger.  Grigione adds, “In addition to their importance in the ecosystem, carnivores allow us to appreciate true wildness because many of the carnivore species will never fully cohabitate with humans.”

WHAT: “When Carnivores Become Neighbors,” a roundtable discussion on living near carnivores

WHEN: Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012, 6:30p.m. – 8:30p.m.

WHERE: Pace University, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville, NY, entrance 3, Kessel Student Center, Gottesman Room

WHO: Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies  www.pace.edu/paaes/wildlife-westchester

This event is free and open to the public. Media admission by press pass. RSVP paceacademy@pace.edu.

Media Contact: Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu, 914-906-9680.

The Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies: The Academy is the first of several centers for excellence envisioned by Pace University’s President, Stephen Friedman, to promote high-level collaborative and interdisciplinary programming in key thematic, academic areas throughout the University. The Academy is a freestanding institute that renews and deepens the University’s long-standing commitment to environmental research, scholarship, and service.

Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies is dedicated to enhancing a mutually beneficial relationship between nature and society by harnessing the unique knowledge, talents and skills intrinsic to university life. www.pace.edu/paaes/

About Pace University: For 106 years, Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube.

NEWS RELEASE: Daniel “Rudy” Ruettiger to Speak at Pace University on September 5

Daniel “Rudy” Ruettiger will be speaking to Pace’s student athletes about his inspirational life story on Wednesday, September 5 at 7 pm at the Goldstein Health, Fitness and Recreation Center. This event is free and open to the public.

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y.- The Pace University Athletics Department is will welcome Daniel “Rudy” Ruettiger to Pace’s Pleasantville campus on Wednesday, September 5 at 7 pm at the Goldstein Health, Fitness and Recreation Center. He will be speak to Pace’s student athletes about his inspirational life story. This event is free and open to the public. Rudy will also do a book signing following his talk.

For the first time, read Daniel “Rudy” Ruettiger’s real life story in Rudy: My Story revealing the man behind the beloved movie Rudy, and his continued determination to make his dreams come true. Rudy describes growing up in Joliet, Ill., becoming one of only a few players in Notre Dame history to be carried off the field, struggling to get a movie made about his life, and losing sight of his own dreams, nearly derailing him. Rudy details the failures and hard lessons he’s learned and shows how hitting the reset button was the best thing that happened him.

“I fell into the same obvious trap that the rest of the country had fallen into in all of those boom years: I shouldn’t have been chasing the money,” says Rudy. “I should have been chasing the dream. It was one of the most profound, simple, important lessons I would ever learn – and the consequences of that lesson would haunt me for years.”

Rudy doesn’t just represent some far-fetched Hollywood story that most people can never attain—its message is that Rudy is an “Average Joe,” and anyone with a dream can make that dream a reality by being willing to put in the hard work, and heart, it takes to get there.

Daniel “Rudy” Ruettiger is the subject of the blockbuster film Rudy and one of the most popular motivational speakers in the United States. His humble background and determination to pursue his dreams, no matter the challenge, has made him legendary and an inspiration to everyone from school children to businessmen and athletes, even presidents. He established the Rudy Foundation to help children around the world and the Rudy Awards for high school and university level athletes.

The Journal News: Pace University graduation Photo Gallery, classmates honor Danroy Henry

Several media outlets in Westchester covered Pace’s undergraduate commencement ceremony in Pleasantville and the Law School commencement in White Plains. The Journal News, The Examiner, News 12, The Daily Pleasantville and Patch.com were on hand to celebrate the 2012 graduations.

Several media outlets in Westchester covered Pace’s undergraduate commencement ceremony in Pleasantville and the Law School commencement in White Plains. The Journal News, The Examiner, News 12, The Daily Pleasantville and Patch.com were on hand to celebrate the 2012 graduations.

Patch.com‘s coverage included photos and video:

“Stories are not static, but dynamic. They continue to evolve in ways we can anticipate and in ways we can’t.”

In his commencement speech to the Pace University Class of 2012, Jacob Burns Film Center Executive Director Stephen Apkon (a Pace alumnus) encouraged the graduates to use their knowledge and experience to shape their own stories as they continue their journeys, yet be open to “uncommon sense.”

“So, what will your story be?” he asked.

For Alison Lee Goshgarian—a Dyson College of Arts and Sciences undergraduate and one of the 433 students who walked across the Goldstein Fitness Center stage in Pleasantville Friday—her story started off with an unexpected turn of events.

“When I was a senior in high school, I was rejected from every college I applied to,” she revealed to the crowd of 3,200 attendees. “That damper on my self-esteem is what turned my life into a complete different direction.”

U.S. Senator Charles Schumer (D-NY) also shared a personal anecdote that changed his life. As a young man, he was offered an all-expenses paid opportunity to travel around the world, but chose to stay home with a girl he loved…who ended up leaving him shortly after.

“There I was—no scholarship, no trip around the world…no girl,” he said. “I said to myself, ‘What a loser you are.'”

After moping around “for several months” and then attending law school, Schumer decided to change courses again and run for office.

“Don’t forget—go for it!” he told the graduates.

From the Pleasantville Examiner:

Stephen Apkon, founder and executive director of the Jacob Burns Film Center, was awarded an honorary degree and delivered the commencement address at Pace University’s May 11 graduation at its Pleasantville campus.

The ceremonies, which also featured U.S. Senator Charles Schumer, drew more than 3,000 people who watched the 443 graduates receive their degrees.

“Today is not just a marking of classes taken or credits earned, of tests passed or majors fulfilled, it is neither beginning nor end, but rather a place to stop, to celebrate your accomplishments and to look toward the future,” Apkon said. “It is a turning of the page.”

Apkon spoke to graduates about the importance of stories in their lives and how that has evolved over the years.

“I have pinned above my desk a quote from the great American documentary filmmaker Albert Maysles who said, ‘The stories people tell have a way of taking care of them. If stories come to you, care for them. And learn to give them away when they are needed. Sometimes a person needs a story more than food to stay alive. That is why we put these stories in each other’s memory. This is how people care for themselves.”

Despite the steep challenges facing graduates, Apkon pointed out how the world is more interconnected than it has ever been and how much easier it is to bring stories and information to the masses.

“Over four billion videos are viewed [on youtube] by more than 800 million people,” Apkon said. “More video is uploaded each month than our networks produced collectively, in their more than 60 years of existence. Videos can be created and shared by each of us as a result of hitting send.”

In his parting words to the Class of 2012, Apkon told them to write their own story, occupy their life and listen deeply.

“Foster the seeds that have been planted in your time here at Pace University,” Apkon said. “I congratulate you and wish you continued success. I wish you happiness, fulfillment and deep connection. And I wish you uncommon sense.”

Schumer congratulated the graduates and told them and their families to cherish a special moment such as this.

“One of the greatest days of the life of my wife and me was seeing our daughter graduate college,” Schumer said. “Congratulations to your moms and dads.”

From The Daily Pleasantville:

Undergraduate students at Pace University‘s Pleasantville campus walked the onto the stage and into a new phase of life during Friday morning’s graduation ceremony.

“Commencement is a beginning; not an end,” said Harriet Feldman, interim provost and executive vice president for academic affairs. “We know that this commencement ceremony not only marks great achievement, in your Pace University degree, but it also marks an achievement that will continue throughout your lifetimes.”

Degrees were given to 433 students, who arrived in the Goldstein Fitness Center on a blue carpet, where they were greeted by more than 3,200 cheering friends, relatives and parents.

“Is this really happening?” said Alison Lee Goshgarian, the class speaker. Goshgarian, a graduate of Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, said she was rejected by every college she applied to out of high school.

“As we all know, life isn’t easy. But I chose to overcome adversity,” Goshgarian said. “That morning when I woke up I told myself, ‘You’re going to go to junior college for one year, and one year only. You gotta get straight A’s; you’re going to go to a place where you can start and design your life.’ And I did. It doesn’t matter how long it takes to get to your next step. Sometimes you need to take those baby steps in order for you to achieve your goal.”

Goshgarian also paid tribute to a fallen classmate, D.J. Henry, who was fatally shot in 2010. He had been on schedule to graduate in 2012.

“We are not just students; we are a community,” Goshgarian said. “Together we have experienced happiness, stress, tears, laughter, love and tragedy. Tragedy struck our class, and we honor the spirit of those not with us today. And we can safely say that Pace has turned us into a family.”

Stephen Apkon, founder and executive director of the Jacob Burns Film Center, received an honorary degree and addressed the students during the ceremony.

“Each of you, the Pace University class of 2012, stand here today, poised to change the world, to make it a little healthier, a little more just, a little more connected,” Apkon said. “You will no doubt experience unforeseen challenges and unanticipated joys. You will suffer unexpected setbacks and unimagined successes. In short, you will experience life in its fullest.”

Visit The Daily Pleasantville on Facebook for a complete album of pictures from the ceremony.

Pace University graduation Photo Gallery, classmates honor Danroy Henry | The Journal News | LoHud.com | LoHud.com.

Pleasantville Examiner: Pace Students Walk for Cancer Research, Administrator at Relay for Life

The Pleasantville Examiner featured Pace’s Relay for Life event and the personal connection it holds for the Pace community.

The Examiner newspapers in Pleasantville and White Plains featured Pace’s Relay for Life event and the personal connection it holds for the Pace community.

From the Examiner:

For many of the more than 500 Pace University students who participated in last weekend’s American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life, there is usually a personal connection bringing them to the event.

There may have been a relative, a friend or a classmate they have been close with who has been stricken by the disease.

However, for nearly all of those who took part last Friday and Saturday in the fourth annual relay at Pace’s Goldstein Fitness Center, there was a member of the school community who has touched–and inspired–almost everyone.

Sue Maxam, the university’s director for student success, was diagnosed last summer with Stage 2 breast cancer. While the perpetually upbeat administrator vowed from the day she received her doctor’s phone call that she would beat the disease, Maxam said the support shown to her by the school community has lifted her beyond what she thought she could accomplish.

“When I said earlier that I believe it was the support that helped me to recover more so than the surgery and the chemo, I’m not kidding. I really believe that,” said Maxam. Melissa Cardon, one of the faculty organizers of the walk, said since so many of the university’s students interact with Maxam, having her attend the event and address the crowd was critical.

“A lot of them know her and it really did hit home for a lot of them,” Cardon said. “My team renamed ourselves for her because we all love her, even before she was battling cancer. It does make it more meaningful, though.”

More than 85 teams gathered by 4 p.m. last Friday for the 12-hour walkathon. By the time the event started, $29,500 was already raised with a goal of reaching $55,000, said Allyson Dyl, president of Colleges Against Cancer at Pace, which organizes Relay for Life on college campuses throughout the country.

Money is raised and donated to the American Cancer Society through previous events staged by the teams and through donations. Participants also sold food and tickets for various games and activities. Participants walked on the roughly 1/8-mile walking track above the main gym.

Dyl mentioned that it isn’t surprising that Relay for Life has become an important day at Pace. “Every year we always have a good turnout,” she said. “It’s our one really main event as a school, so it’s something that people look forward to each year.”

Sophomore Chris Alessandro has participated in events to fight cancer since a teacher of his in high school passed away. He wasn’t going to pass up the chance to participate with members of his Alpha Phi Delta fraternity, one of the 85 teams.

“It’s a really touching time,” said Alessandro, who was featured on PCTV with Pleasantville Mayor Peter Scherer last week to promote the walkathon. “Everybody just enjoys tonight and we do the best that we can.”

Maxam, whose parents and all four grandparents succumbed to the disease, said after her diagnosis, colleagues and students went out of their way to help her and her family to make their lives easier. It is something she vowed to never forget.

“Over the course of the next few months I experienced something that most people don’t experience their entire lives–a deep and profound humanity in every single person I encountered as well as people I never met,” Maxam said.

“Before I had cancer I always thought there was good in everyone but after cancer I’m convinced that everybody at their core is so, so good.”

http://www.theexaminernews.com/archives/westchester/West.Examiner4-24-12.pdf