Westchester County Business Journal: “Pace’s software tech takes on online cheaters”

Now new research at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems has found a scientific way to detect cheating when students take online exams. But the findings have broader implications in a world rife with hackers and cybercrime. The U.S. Department of Defense has a strong interest in the college’s findings.

The intensity and speed at which you hit the keys on your computer says a lot about yourself.

Now new research at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems has found a scientific way to detect cheating when students take online exams. But the findings have broader implications in a world rife with hackers and cybercrime. The U.S. Department of Defense has a strong interest in the college’s findings.

Read the article in Westchester County Business Journal.

Westchester County Business Journal: “Pace to offer computer science Ph.D”

. . . “The goal of the new Ph.D program is to build on Pace’s successful B.S. in computer science, M.S. in computer science and D.P.S. in computing programs and cultivate advanced computing research scholars and professionals who will be competent in both industry and academia,” said Dr. Amar Gupta, dean of the Seidenberg School.

. . . This is the first Ph.D program in computer science in the Hudson Valley between New York City and Albany. Students will be closely integrated in applied research projects that emphasize telehealth and biometrics, web computing and information assurance, artificial intelligence and robotics, and software engineering and formal methods.

To learn more about the program, call graduate admission at 914-422-4283, email gradwp@pace.edu or visit http://www.pace.edu/seidenberg/seidenberg-programs/doctoral-programs/doctor-philosophy-computer-science 

Read about it on Journal News blog The Hall Monitor  and Westchester County Business Journal.

 

TheStreet (video): “Android Gains Ground on iPhone”

Google’s Android has 80% marketshare as the Apple Iphone languishes, says Darren Hayes, Professor of Forensics and Security at Pace University.

Google’s Android has 80% marketshare as the Apple Iphone languishes, says Darren Hayes, Professor of Forensics and Security at Pace University.

Watch the video on TheStreet.

If you like playing casino slot games for real money on Android app have a look at this website.

Smithsonian magazine: “How You Type Could Become Your New Password”

. . . “We can track how long each particular key on the keyboard is pressed by a user on average, which is called the ‘dwell time,’ and the average transition time between any two particular keys,” says Charles Tappert, a computer scientist at Pace University.

. . . “We can track how long each particular key on the keyboard is pressed by a user on average, which is called the ‘dwell time,’ and the average transition time between any two particular keys,” says Charles Tappert, a computer scientist at Pace University.

Read the article in the July-August issue of Smithsonian magazine.

Greenwich Time: “Pace honors Donofrio with leadership award”

Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems honored Nicholas Donofrio, IBM Fellow Emeritus and a retired executive vice president for innovation & technology at the 18th Leadership and Service in Technology Award reception at Bank of New York Mellon in New York City on May 21.

Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems honored Nicholas Donofrio, IBM Fellow Emeritus and a retired executive vice president for innovation & technology at the 18th Leadership and Service in Technology Award reception at Bank of New York Mellon in New York City on May 21.

Read about it in Greenwich Time.

U.S.News & World Report: “Face Online Bachelor’s Programs That Don’t Make the Grade”

. . . “I’ve heard very concerning stories about well-known universities that are rushing to get online programs out there and quality is not what it should be generally,” says Jonathan Hill, associate dean at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. “It’s a really exciting time out there, but it’s also buyer beware.”

. . . “I’ve heard very concerning stories about well-known universities that are rushing to get online programs out there and quality is not what it should be generally,” says Jonathan Hill, associate dean at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. “It’s a really exciting time out there, but it’s also buyer beware.”

Read the article by U.S.News & World Report.

Read about Pace University ranked #1 by U.S.News & World Report on the list of the best online bachelor’s degree programs.

American Banker: “Compromise Needed on U.S. EMV Adoption Plan”

“The recent $45 million ATM heist is dramatic evidence of the urgent need for improvements to payment card security,” writes Darren Hayes, chair of the computer information systems program at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York.

“The recent $45 million ATM heist is dramatic evidence of the urgent need for improvements to payment card security,” writes Darren Hayes, chair of the computer information systems program at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York.

Read his op-ed on American Banker’s BankThink blog.

Computerworld: “Making peril permanent: Google’s Gmail app redesign”

. . . In considering the Gmail app changes, Richard Kline, a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, said Google has been paying a lot more attention to design and aesthetics lately.

. . . In considering the Gmail app changes, Richard Kline, a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, said Google has been paying a lot more attention to design and aesthetics lately.

While Google has been encouraging people to archive rather than delete for a long time, Kline said the interface change may be an effort to provide the most important features in a way that is still useable on a small screen.

The best evidence that usability was a major driver in Google’s app redesign, said Kline, is that the Web interface has remained the same, with the archive and delete buttons next to each other.

Kline said there is appeal to the idea of archive default. Rather than prompt people to consider whether something should be kept, “they tried to provide a mechanism by which you just save everything” while making it easy to search for it later.

Kline said he manages his email, and deletes messages he does not believe should be saved. But he suggest a middle road for Google, and that’s a check-off option for keeping an email in the inbox for 60 days before it’s automatically deleted, something he said would be useful for short-lived discussions.

Read the article by Computerworld.

MarketWatch: “Who’s a bigger snoop: the NSA or your boss?”

. . . “The U.S. Constitution protects individuals against abuses by the government,” says Darren R. Hayes, assistant professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York City. “But there’s not a lot of protection of data collected on individuals.”

. . . “The U.S. Constitution protects individuals against abuses by the government,” says Darren R. Hayes, assistant professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York City. “But there’s not a lot of protection of data collected on individuals.” Most U.S. privacy regulation is based on self-regulation, he says, where companies dictate their own policies on handling employee and customer privacy. In Europe, there are stricter government rules about collecting and using personal data; individuals must give their unambiguous consent, he says.

Read the story on MarketWatch.

The Hill’s Congress Blog: “Congress must move carefully in regulating corporate cybersecurity”

“The Federal Trade Commission’s recent lawsuit against hotelier Wyndham neatly encapsulates the most vexing problem information security practitioners face — how to protect digital data residing inside corporate networks,” writes Pace professor James W. Gabberty.

“The Federal Trade Commission’s recent lawsuit against hotelier Wyndham neatly encapsulates the most vexing problem information security practitioners face — how to protect digital data residing inside corporate networks,” writes Pace professor James W. Gabberty.
Read his op-ed on The Hill’s Congress Blog.