Harvard Business Review (webinar): “After an Attack: Protecting Your Data, Your Customer and Your Reputation”

Darren Hayes, a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, was the speaker for a Harvard Business Review webinar on cyberattacks.

Darren Hayes, a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, was the speaker for a Harvard Business Review webinar on cyberattacks.

View the presentation.

Forensic Science Education Blog: “Top 10 Computer Forensics Professors”

Darren Hayes, a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, is on the list of the top 10 computer forensic professors nationwide who have expertise from network security information to cybercrime.

Darren Hayes, a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, is among the top 10 computer forensic professors nationwide who have expertise from network security information to cybercrime, according to the Forensic Science Education Blog.

CSO: “Researcher argues for open hardware to defend against NSA spying”

. . . James W. Gabberty, a professor of information systems at Pace University, said “no other information security control trumps the importance of regular and comprehensive auditing.”

. . . James W. Gabberty, a professor of information systems at Pace University, said “no other information security control trumps the importance of regular and comprehensive auditing.”

“Moving towards an Internet infrastructure that is 100% auditable by both governments and companies alike makes the most sense since, after all, we live in an era of increasing paranoia exacerbated by highly publicized regular hacking incidents of our most important societal systems,” he said.

Read the story by CSO.

Westchester Magazine: “BIZ BUZZ”

New research at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems has found a way to detect cheating students taking online exams. The U.S. Department of Defense has shown interest in the research as a possible aid in its ongoing battle against computer hacking and cybercrimes.

New research at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems has found a way to detect cheating students taking online exams. The U.S. Department of Defense has shown interest in the research as a possible aid in its ongoing battle against computer hacking and cybercrimes. Through keystroke and stylometry biometrics, a software program that records a person’s typing patterns and linguistic style, the key-logger application can remember the behavior of a test-taker. This helps online instructors determine whether the person taking the exam is the same person enrolled in the class. According to Amar Gupta, dean of Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, the college is introducing keystroke and biometrics in the lab and slowly expanding it to online education.

Westchester Magazine: BIZ BUZZ

University Business: “Cyberattacks on the rise in higher education”

. . . “With government-sponsored attacks, these happen over time, so they have staff who can spend a lot of time working on reconnaissance about different organizations,” says Darren Hayes, an assistant professor at the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace. “Lots of organizations, including universities, don’t often realize how much information they give out on the internet.”

. . . social media and the openness of the internet can be a big problem, says Darren Hayes, an assistant professor at the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University in New York.

“With government-sponsored attacks, these happen over time, so they have staff who can spend a lot of time working on reconnaissance about different organizations,” says Hayes. “Lots of organizations, including universities, don’t often realize how much information they give out on the internet.”

For example, an institution may post an IT job opening on Monster.com or its own website that lists the computer systems, hardware, or software that candidates must know how to use.

“If their post says a candidate needs to be an expert on the IBM 5700, suddenly somebody knows they have an IBM 5700 and they know the vulnerabilities of that system,” Hayes says.

Members of an institution’s IT department may have a LinkedIn profile that lists their employer, position, and the hardware and software at which they are proficient. Also, IT staff may use internet forums to ask industry colleagues for help fixing a computer system. This provides hackers more valuable clues about an institution’s network, Hayes says.

But colleges and universities may not even be aware of the most sophisticated attacks until they are already well underway. Therefore, institutions need IT staff with a new range of “cyberforensic” skills to identify the virtually microscopic changes in a computer network that indicate an infiltration. “It can be something as simple as a couple of lines of code changed in a registry file,” says Hayes. “We’re talking about very, very small changes that traditional security tools do not pick up.”

Read the article in University Business.

TechNewsWorld: “RSA Warns Customers Off Suspected NSA-Tainted Crypto Tools”

Revelations about weaknesses in encryption standards that have long been revered to undermine much of NIST’s research and publications, said Darren Hayes, CIS program chair at Pace University’s Seidenberg School. “Of great concern is that other nations competing with the USA in terms of trade or weaponry have become more educated about deficiencies in how we secure our intellectual property.”

Revelations about weaknesses in encryption standards that have long been revered to undermine much of NIST’s research and publications, said Darren Hayes, CIS program chair at Pace University’s Seidenberg School. “Of great concern is that other nations competing with the USA in terms of trade or weaponry have become more educated about deficiencies in how we secure our intellectual property.”

Read the story by TechNewsWorld.

MarketWatch: “How IPO will change Twitter”

. . . “The layout of the site will change dramatically after the IPO,” says Darren R. Hayes, assistant professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York City. After Facebook bought photo-filter site Instagram last year and, Twitter responded by acquiring video-sharing service Vine.

. . . “The layout of the site will change dramatically after the IPO,” says Darren R. Hayes, assistant professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York City. After Facebook bought photo-filter site Instagram last year and, Twitter responded by acquiring video-sharing service Vine.

Read the story by MarketWatch.

InformationWeek: “Twitter Prepares IPO, Facebook Pain In Mind”

. . . “The general market conditions are not unfavorable,” said Darren R. Hayes, a computer science professor at Pace University. “It may be a good time for Twitter to go public. There doesn’t seem to be too much negative information about the macroeconomic climate.”

. . . Darren R. Hayes, a computer science professor at Pace University in New York and a former investment banker, agreed in a phone interview that Twitter appears to have chosen to go public at the right time.

“The general market conditions are not unfavorable,” he said. “It may be a good time for Twitter to go public. There doesn’t seem to be too much negative information about the macroeconomic climate.”

Hayes suggests a repeat of the Facebook IPO disaster is unlikely. He blames the underwriter rather than the company itself for failing to attract enough support from institutional investors. He also notes that concerns about Facebook’s growth had been raised when GM publicly distanced itself from Facebook advertising (only to return a year later).

Hayes says that a concern among investors in social media companies is that company business models may be vulnerable to being copied. He doesn’t see that as an issue for Twitter in the near term, but he says it’s something to consider for any social media company.

Read the article by InformationWeek.

TechNewsWorld: “Samsung Draws a Big ‘Meh’ for Clunky, Pricey Galaxy Gear Smartwatch”

. . . “I saw the presentation today, and one thing that really struck me was how it seems like because they’re trying to satisfy every customer need, their device has become a lot more complex,” Darren Hayes, a professor at Pace University, told TechNewsWorld.

. . . “I saw the presentation today, and one thing that really struck me was how it seems like because they’re trying to satisfy every customer need, their device has become a lot more complex,” Darren Hayes, a professor at Pace University, told TechNewsWorld.

Associated Press: “In Nokia acquisition, Microsoft tries to catch up”

. . . “It’s a three-horse race, and Microsoft knows it needs to come up with a more well-defined plan for mobile devices to catch up,” said Darren Hayes, a computer science professor at Pace University in New York. “This was an essential acquisition for them.”

. . . “It’s a three-horse race, and Microsoft knows it needs to come up with a more well-defined plan for mobile devices to catch up,” said Darren Hayes, a computer science professor at Pace University in New York. “This was an essential acquisition for them.”

Read the article by Associated Press.

Read more comments from Professor Hayes:  Computerworld, Time, and USA Today.