Tribeca Trib: Pace University Students Learn Teaching Skills from Digital Pupils

Pace University’s School of Education is one of 10 campuses around the country using a program called TeachLivE in the classroom to train teachers. The Tribeca Trib ran a feature story on it with photos.

The Tribeca Trib featured Pace School of Education’s TeachLivE Lab.

From the Tribeca Trib:

The first time Aldajana Ado­vac stood in front of her tutoring class of five sixth-grade students, she knew right away she’d have trouble.

There was Marcus, the smart aleck in the back row, Monique, a chatty know-it-all in front who could hog class time with her ramblings, and Francis, a willing au­d­ience for every one of Marcus’ quips. Then there was Maria, in the corner, who was smart but too shy to speak.

“Man, this is B.S.,” Marcus sighed, slumping over his desk as Adovac suggested he reread a passage from the lesson. “I already said my words.”

With the five of them, keeping this class on track wouldn’t be easy, but Ad­ovac, a Pace University graduate education student who teaches in a girls’ middle school, had an out: her students were digital—avatars animated by an ac­tor in a sound studio in Florida who can see and hear the teacher. If she lost control of the class, or wanted to test an approach with a student, she could simply take off her headphones and try again another time. Meanwhile, her classmates watched from around the real classroom, taking notes.

After “teaching” her short lesson, Adovac said she realized that she had given too much attention to the trouble-making Marcus. “The next time I get into a situation with a student who is combative or disruptive, I won’t be so quick to answer everything they say,” she said.

Avatars are not just for Hollywood anymore. Pace University’s School of Education is one of 10 campuses around the country using a program called TeachLivE in the classroom to train teachers. Developed by the education and computer science departments at the University of Central Florida, the program’s goal is to allow new teachers to practice on “students” without leaving the building on Spruce Street.

“It’s wonderful if you want to try out a strategy or a lesson,” said Sha­ron Me­dow, a veteran professor in Pace’s School of Education. “We can teach about a theory, then actually practice it.”

Find the rest of the story at The Tribeca Trib.

BlackberryCool: RIM to Host Future Developer Event at Pace University

RIM is hosting its inaugural Future Developer Event at Pace University in New York City.

From the web site BlackberryCool:

RIM is hosting its inaugural Future Developer Event at Pace University in New York City. The event, held on Pace’s campus, gives students the opportunity to develop their own BlackBerry app, using RIM’s HTML5/WebWorks tools. The event kicks off Friday, March 30 at 9 a.m. and continues through Saturday at 5 p.m.

Students will get to engage in hands-on app development, and they’ll have to support of the experts through panels and briefings. They will also be able to learn techniques to develop compelling apps for BlackBerry smartphones and the PlayBook.

The program aims to give students, hands-on experience and access to RIM experts. Students attend a developer panel, which includes experts from RIM and from their developer partners.

Story found at BLACKBERRYCOOL.

The Journal News: Suffern High Robotics Heading to World Championships

The Journal News ran an article on Suffern High School robotics team that won the Hudson Valley championship at Pace University in January.

The Journal News ran an article on Suffern High School robotics team that won the Hudson Valley championship at Pace University in January.

From The Journal News:

Some Suffern High School students are hoping their robots can reach high enough to outsmart the competition this Saturday and next month.

The students on the school’s robotics team won the Hudson Valley championship at Pace University in January, entitling them to take one of their two team robots to a mega competition in St. Louis, Miss., in April.

This Saturday, the team will first compete at the Jacob Javits Center in New York to try to qualify their second robot to enter the St. Louis event.

“We’re pretty young at this, and we’re pretty excited that a team only three years old is going to nationals,” said team adviser George Mugno, who teaches mathematics and engineering at Suffern High.

Find the team at their site and on Facebook.

Read the rest of the article at the Journal News Rockland edition.

Los Angeles Times: Program Teaches Computer Skills to Older Generation

The Los Angeles Times featured Pace’s “gerontechnology” program headed by computer science professor Jean Coppola on the same day that she was honored by Cerebral Palsy of Westchester which declared today “Jean Coppola Day” for the work she does teaching technology to older adults. Coppola was also recently named one of Computerworld’s 2012 laureates.

The Los Angeles Times featured Pace’s “gerontechnology” program headed by computer science professor Jean Coppola on the same day that she was honored by Cerebral Palsy of Westchester which declared “Jean Coppola Day” for the work she does teaching technology to older adults. Coppola was also recently named one of Computerworld’s 2012 laureates.

The Los Angeles Times featured two versions of the story – one on the front page of the print edition and one in the technology section. The stories have been picked up by web sites and TV stations nationwide.

From the LA Times:

Thirty senior citizens squeezed around a long table designed for about 20, the crush made tighter by canes, walkers and wheelchairs. As late arrivals wriggled between others in search of a seat, snippets of conversation floated from the chatty crowd.

“I don’t have a computer. I don’t have any of that Google stuff,” one exasperated woman said. “Facebook? What’s that?” another asked loudly, to no one in particular. “It’s a program. It’s a computer program,” a man responded knowingly, displaying a confidence rarely seen in the 75-and-over age group when talk turns to laptops, PCs, iPads, smartphones and all that comes with them.

That’s why these seniors had gathered at the Hallmark, their assisted-living facility in Lower Manhattan. They wanted to begin the task of catching up with a technical world whose rapid-fire evolution has left much of America’s oldest generation isolated from its children, grandchildren and tech-savvy friends.

“It’s so hard to do. But at least I’ve stopped crying,” said Roz Carlin, 92, speaking for many as she described breaking down in tears when she first tried using a computer. Like most of the students, Carlin initially resisted the technology until her daughter forced the issue by giving her an iPad.

Now, after mastering email, she was back to learn more.

Their teachers were students from New York’s Pace University who earn credits participating in a program to bridge the gap created by the computer age.

Read the full article at the Los Angeles Times.

Market Watch/The Wall Street Journal: Annual Computerworld Honors Program Names 2012 Laureates

Market Watch, part of the Wall Street Journal’s digital network, ran a press release from Computerworld on the Global Information Technology Awards for individuals and organizations that use information technology to benefit society. Pace Professor Jean Coppola, from the Seidenberg School for Computer Science and Information Systems, was honored for her work teaching technology to older adults.

Market Watch, part of the Wall Street Journal’s digital network, ran a press release from Computerworld on the Global Information Technology Awards for individuals and organizations that use information technology to benefit society. Pace Professor Jean Coppola, from the Seidenberg School for Computer Science and Information Systems, was honored for her work teaching technology to older adults.

From the press release:

Computerworld Honors Program, honoring visionary applications of information technology promoting positive social, economic and educational change, has selected 200 Laureates for 2012. These individuals will be commemorated during the Annual Laureates Medal Ceremony & Gala Awards Evening on June 4, 2012 at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington, D.C.

For over two decades, The Computerworld Honors Program has recognized individuals and organizations who create and use information technology to promote and advance public welfare, contribute to the greater good of society and change the world for the better. The 2012 award categories are:
—  Collaboration
—  Digital Access
—  Economic Development
—  Emerging Technology
—  Environment
—  Health
—  Human Services
—  Innovation
—  Safety & Security
—  Training/Education

Read the rest of the article at Market Watch.

MarketWatch

 

Patch.com: Pace Students Head to International Mobile Challenge

Two Pace students are heading to South Africa to showcase their Android app.

Two Pace students are heading to South Africa to showcase their Android app. Patch.com ran the story on the Pace team’s success at the mobile challenge in Barcelona and their invitation to compete in South Africa.

Read the full story on Patch.com.

The Daily Cortlandt: Lego Robots Teach Math in Croton Mentoring Program

Students from the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems were featured in an article in The Daily Cortlandt. (Left: Pierre Van Cortlandt students in the Croton robotics program.Photo credit:Courtesy of the Croton-Harmon School District).

Students from the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems were featured in an article in The Daily Cortlandt.

From the article:

“Legos come to life in the sixth grade classrooms of Pierre Van Cortlandt Middle School. Students at PVC are being mentored by undergraduate science majors from Pace University to create robots.

Undergraduate students enrolled in Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems have been making visits to PVC to mentor sixth graders in the school’s robotics class. The classes are under the direction of teachers Lori Peterson, Lauren Scollins and Erica Camilo.

“Our students are working together in groups, with support from their mentors, to solve problems,” said Scollins. “The critical thinking skills they have demonstrated are played out through the high functionality of their robots. The transformation that I have seen has been wonderful.”

The club originally began as an afterschool “Crobotics” club and grew into part of the school’s STEM-D programming. The buzz word around school districts is short for the emphasis educators are putting on Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Design.

The joint effort between the PVC teachers and the Pace students is teaching middle schoolers to use Lego Mindstorm NXT kits and software to build and program robots to function at a high level.

To date, the class has conducted robot races, scavenger hunts and even a dance-off in which students programmed their Lego robots to dance to specified choreography based on the beat of certain music.

The robotics curriculum ties into the coming year’s math lessons and educators are hoping to use the robots in future lessons to address real world problems.”

Read the original article here.

NEWS ADVISORY: Pace University Team Placed Fourth in Mobile Challenge in Barcelona

Pace University students Peter Franceschini, a computer science major, and John Robb, majoring in both art and communications, placed fourth at The Berkeley Mobile International Collaborative (BMIC) University Mobile Challenge in Barcelona, Spain, and have been invited to compete at the Mobile Health Challenge in Cape Town, South Africa in May.

Pace Team Placed Fourth in BMIC’S University Mobile Challenge in Barcelona

PLEASANTVILLE, NY,  March 8, 2012 – Pace University students Peter Franceschini, a computer science major, and John Robb, majoring in both art and communications, placed fourth at The Berkeley Mobile International Collaborative (BMIC) University Mobile Challenge in Barcelona, Spain, and have been invited to compete at the Mobile Health Challenge in Cape Town, South Africa in May. Of the fourteen teams that competed, the Pace team was one of only three from the US.

Peter and John pooled their individual skills to create CANDOO, an app designed for Android based tablet devices. The app is designed to help seniors and/or those with fine motor skill difficulties to have an easier time accessing tablet features using large, clearly labeled buttons and voice input/output features. Users may also access their email, open a web browser, track their medications, or launch other apps with ease. The app is designed as a launcher, so the CANDOO home page is displayed upon powering up, and is easily reachable by a “Home” button in other apps.

A video demonstration of the CANDOO app is viewable at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kFwCnUbIQR4.

The students were part of a class with computer science professor Jean Coppola, PhD. Coppola, a proponent of service-learning, challenged her students to create something that can help others. This was just one of several of her students’ projects. The CANDOO app has won several competitions including the BMIC challenge.

BMIC’s annual competition which began in 2009 provides students with the experience of international-level competition, as well as the chance to engage in an entrepreneurial endeavor. Select student teams from around the world travelled to Barcelona and were challenged to design a mobile app or business concept that addresses a need in today’s world. Entries were judged on a number of criteria: Commercial Appeal, Essential Value & Utility, Innovation & Uniqueness, UI and Quality of Experience, Effective Use of API(s) & Technology, Significance of “Problem” App Identifies/Solves, Due Diligence, and Funding. The competition not only challenged the students to win the competition, but to also gain the interest of investors and venture capitalists in attendance.

Peter and John will be travelling to South Africa in May for the GSMA Mobile Health University Challenge. The competition will challenge student teams to develop a Mobile Health concept that addresses a Healthcare need, and may be a business concept or technological development that targets any issue or end user.  Judging will be based upon similar criteria to the Barcelona event, with the addition of Meaningful Feedback, Global Markets, and Regulatory Considerations.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

 

Downtown Express: Pace Holds Tech Talk

This Wednesday, March 7, Pace university hosts “Tech Talk” and the “Power of Social Media in Politics.”

Pace’s upcoming “Tech Talk” was listed in the Downtown Express.

From the article:

Pace holds Tech Talk

Emilie Zaslow

Get involved this Wednesday, March 7 as Pace university hosts “Tech Talk” and the “Power of Social Media in Politics.” The panel is set to discuss social media issues that have and is still impacting today’s politics. Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems and the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences have sponsored this panel to discuss the impact political issues we face today. What a perfect time to discuss this important issue with the upcoming primaries and elections in New York City. Panelists include Dr. Christopher Malone, associate professor and chair of the Political Science Department at Pace, Dr. Emilie Zaslow, assistant professor of communication studies at Pace, Dr. Cathy Dwyer, associate professor of information technology at Pace. The free event will be held at Pace University’s downtown NYC campus, located at One Pace Plaza, from 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m.

Cathy Dwyer
Chris Malone

 

The Journal News and Rye Brook Westmore News: Robot battles at FTC tournament

Blind Brook High School’s robotics club, a.k.a “We wreck and tech,” pitted their robot against five other teams at the FIRST Tech Challenge championship tournament at Pace.

In “Tech Engineering Students Place Second in Hudson Valley Robotics Challenge,” Brian Howard of The Journal News reported on New Visions Engineering students from The Tech Center in northern Westchester who competed at the Hudson Valley FIRST Tech Challenge at Pace in Pleasantville.

New Visions Engineering students from The Tech Center

Thirty-six teams from New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Massachusetts competed in the challenge, run in part by Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, in which high school students design and build a robots using aluminum, polycarbonate, motors, sensors, and a variety of other materials. They then compete in a series of maneuvering challenges and tasks with their robots.

Read the full story on The Journal News web site here.

Westmore News reported on Blind Brook High School’s robotics club, a.k.a “We wreck and tech,” that pitted their robot against five other teams at the FIRST Tech Challenge championship tournament at Pace on Sunday, Jan. 29.

 

 

 

 

Above: Students from the Blind Brook High School robotics club cluster around the robot they designed, built and programmed. The students were quick to point out that while they weren’t present for the picture, there are, in fact, girls in the club as well. From left: George Tsamparlis, 11th grade, Jonathan Newmark, 11th grade, Jay Glucksman, 10th grade, Justin Cray, 10th grade, Hunter Goldstein, 11th grade, and advisor James Amodio, a Blind Brook science teacher.

Read the article about the team and their competition at Pace by clicking the link below:

Rye Brook Westmore News: BBHS robotics club’s robot battles at FTC tournament.