NEWS RELEASE: Telecommunications Exec Ivan G. Seidenberg to Lecture as Part of Pace University MOOC

Ivan G. Seidenberg — former Verizon top executive and Pace University alumnus for whom the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems is named — will speak at the university on April 3 as a highlight of a lecture series developed by Amar Gupta, Ph.D., Dean of the Seidenberg School, in a Massive Open Online Course, or MOOC.

Telecommunications Exec Ivan G. Seidenberg to Lecture as Part of Pace University MOOC

Amar Gupta, Dean of Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, attracts students through Massive Open Online Course with all-star guest speakers

NEW YORK, March 29 – Ivan G. Seidenberg — former Verizon top executive and Pace University alumnus for whom the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems is named — will speak at the university on April 3 as a highlight of a lecture series developed by Amar Gupta, Ph.D., Dean of the Seidenberg School, in a Massive Open Online Course, or MOOC.

“Open online courses give Pace an exciting new avenue for sharing with individuals across the world the intellectual breadth and emphasis on real-world professional experience that defines our community,” University President Stephen J. Friedman said.

“I am especially delighted that Dr. Gupta’s course will feature Ivan Seidenberg, a visionary leader, whose Pace education started him down the road of driving innovation at Verizon and across the telecommunications industry,” he added. “Mr. Seidenberg, who is also a Pace trustee, has insights and experiences that will make important contributions to this new knowledge arena.”

The event, “Inventing Verizon: Innovation and Growth in a Transforming Communications Industry,” will take place on Wed., from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., at the Downtown Conference Center Amphitheater, 1st floor, 157 William St., New York, NY. The event will be simulcast on Pace’s suburban New York campus in Pleasantville, 861 Bedford Road, Entrance 3, in the Goldstein Academic Center, Room 300. The lecture will also be streamed online on Udemy.com, a course development tool. The free lecture is open to the public.

Seidenberg, retired chairman and CEO of Verizon, will share how he led Verizon on an extraordinary path from a 100-year-old company to a 21st century innovator in broadband and mobile communications, providing a powerful model for how to lead during a time of major technological and social change.

Gupta developed the course, “International Technology Services in the Knowledge Economy to address current trends in business and education. Gupta introduced the concept of the “24-Hour Knowledge Factory,” a model explored in this MOOC, in a detailed, provocative Wall Street Journal article titled “Expanding the 24-Hour Workplace: Round-the-clock operations aren’t just for call centers anymore.” In the new 24-hour workplace, a professional in the United States who works the usual 8-hour work day can transfer a project to a colleague in a different time zone, perhaps in China or Australia, who will then work 8 hours and in turn transfer the project to a colleague in Eastern Europe. The project is then transferred back to the original professional in the US.

The course covers the technological, economic, legal, and political considerations necessary to foster this type of collaboration. See details of the lecture series and view the first two lectures here.

“The concept of the 24-hour knowledge factory is not new to the telecommunications industry,” Seidenberg said. “Communications companies have had to turn to innovative approaches to keep up with a rapidly changing world. I am looking forward to sharing my experiences in this area at Pace.”

Gupta, an expert on linking science with entrepreneurship, joined Pace as the dean of the Seidenberg School in August.

“My role as dean of the Seidenberg School affords me tremendous opportunities for developing new courses geared to the needs of students everywhere,” he said. “The challenges and opportunities of the global knowledge economy can be met with such online courses open to students worldwide.”

Seidenberg (MBA ’81) donated the largest gift in Pace’s history, $15 million awarded to the School of Computer Science and Information Systems in October 2005. One-third of his naming gift supports the Seidenberg Scholars Program, a program dedicated to recruiting and supporting top computing students from across the country.

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Those who wish to attend the lecture in person can register at http://inventing_verizon.eventbrite.com.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, N.Y., enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Media contact:  Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

Hello Central New York: FIRST Tech Challenge

A segment on Hello Central New York, a local news program that covers the Utica area, covered a FIRST Lego scrimmage and mentioned the upcoming Pace tournament several times.

The Hudson Valley FIRST Tech Challenge (FTC) Robotics Tournament is once again happening at Pace in Pleasantville on Sunday, January 27.

A segment on Hello Central New York, a local news program that covers the Utica area, covered a FIRST Lego scrimmage and mentioned the Pace tournament several times. 

View the segment here.

Westchester Magazine: Top 8 Leaders in Westchester

Three of Westchester Magazine’s top 8 leaders in Westchester County are from Pace. “The Riverkeeper” John Cronin, “The Eco-advocate” Nick Robinson and “The Cyber-Security ‘Type’ ” Logan Romm were all featured with interviews and photos among the top 8 in a recent article in the magazine.

Three of Westchester Magazine’s top 8 leaders in Westchester County are from Pace. “The Riverkeeper” John Cronin, “The Eco-advocate” Nick Robinson and “The Cyber-Security ‘Type’ ” Logan Romm were all featured with interviews and photos among the top 8 in a recent article in the magazine.

From Westchester Magazine about the 8 leaders:

… “Westchesterites are looking at our biggest issues and, hopefully, will alter the way we live for the better. They’re impacting Westchester, New York, the USA, and the whole world. These are the 2013 Game Changers.”

About John Cronin, Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs, Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies:

“You can go on your iPhone, and you can know temperature, humidity, and wind speed in Johannesburg, South Africa, in real time,” says John Cronin, senior fellow for Environmental Affairs at the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies in Pleasantville. “But there’s nobody who can tell you—in real time—what’s in your glass of drinking water.”

The fact is disconcerting, but Cronin, 62, aims to change it. He’s organized dropping  sensors in the Hudson and its tributaries to monitor water quality and conditions. But Cronin wants to go further. In addition to changing how we keep our river clean—a project he’s been working on for 40 years—he wants to change the partnerships we enlist to help solve environmental problems.

In October 1973, Cronin was working painting houses when he met Pete Seeger at an event for Seeger’s environmental advocacy and educational vessel, the Hudson River Sloop Clearwater. The two men embarked on a volunteer project: As Seeger sang sea shanties and yodeled, the folk icon brought Cronin into the environmental world. Seeger would insist that, “‘if we all work together, we can clean up the Hudson River.’ I thought that idea was ludicrous,” says Cronin. “The River was huge, horribly polluted.” Nonetheless, inspired by Seeger, Cronin began a career in environmental issues, eventually taking stints advising Republican Congressman Hamilton Fish, Jr., and Democratic New York State Assemblyman Maurice Hinchey.

“I was hooked,” he says. “I went from thinking Pete was out of his mind to thinking that, if you were determined enough, you could make an enormous difference.” Becoming the inaugural Hudson Riverkeeper in 1983, Cronin acted as the clean-water advocate for the River and its tributaries, which provide 9 million New Yorkers with drinking water.

Thanks to Cronin’s media savvy and some real luck—while filming a segment for NBC news, he came upon an Exxon oil tanker discharging pollutants just 1,500 feet from drinking water—and the program took off. Soon, there was a Soundkeeper for Long Island, then a Baykeeper in San Francisco. Today, there are more than 200 similar programs all over the world. During his time as Riverkeeper, Cronin took on all kinds of polluters: New York City, for instance, was dumping 1.5 billion gallons of sewage into the River every day. But many of those on the opposite side of litigation were corporations.

In the past decade, however, Cronin began to formulate different ideas about problem-solving on the environment. He felt that we were “mostly operating under twentieth-century models when twenty-first-century problems need all the talent, all the skills we can muster—no mater where they come from.” Enforcement was still a primary goal, he thought, but the expertise, technology, and capital available in the private sector were nothing to eschew, either. In 2004, he founded the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries, which is today part of Clarkson University, with just this collaborative goal in mind.

One alliance, with Armonk-based IBM, has proved crucial in Cronin’s water-monitoring efforts. John Kelly, a senior vice president and director of Yorktown’s IBM Research (who oversees some 3,000 scientists in laboratories around the world), agrees that Cronin’s ideas are the future. “I think he embodies a visionary who can identify what’s really important through all the clutter. Other people were dreaming, but he knew what to do. His ideas are contagious, and he has the wherewithal to get it done.”

About Nick Robinson, University Professor and Gilbert & Sarah Kerlin Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law, Pace University:

“No, the fights for conservation and against climate change aren’t totally new. So, even if Pace University Law Professor Nicholas Robinson is at the center of both of those struggles, why do we think he also has the next big idea? It’s not just because he was around and affecting policy at the highest levels back when it was a new idea, although he was. Nor is it because his predictions about flooding recently have proven sadly accurate, although they have. It’s because, with all this experience, he knows exactly what we’re going to have to do about it all.

Robinson, of Sleepy Hollow, grew up mostly in Palo Alto, California, where he enjoyed outdoor activities like camping in the Sierras, but the East Coast-style air and water pollution he saw when he started college at Brown University in the early 1960s made him begin taking the study of environmental policy seriously. By 1972, just two years after Robinson graduated from Columbia Law School, New York had adopted his draft of the landmark Tidal Wetlands Act, and “the UN was waking up to the concerns of the environment,” says Robinson, 67. “I was asked by the Sierra Club to attend the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment in Stockholm.”

In the late 1970s, Robinson helped found one of the first environmental law programs in the country at Pace Law School. He was an advisor to Governor Mario Cuomo, general counsel and deputy commissioner of the State Department of Environmental Conservation, and a treaty delegate to the Soviet Union under five presidents. As if all of that weren’t enough, he’s even made his mark on the County’s cultural life, orchestrating the donation of the old Philipse Manor train station to the Hudson Valley Writers’ Center for its headquarters in the late 1980s before such plans for renovation and re-use were common.

But it’s his international work that set the stage for him to establish some of the most important coming trends in the environmental movement. He has helped instruct environmental groups on what legal systems they’ll encounter in writing international treaties, harmonized treaties on endangered species that migrate across borders, and helped establish trans-boundary cooperation for contested areas like the Arctic Circle. “But locally, the same issues play out,” he says. Dealing with climate change means finding money for repairs, reinforcing or altering infrastructure, managing native flora to mitigate flooding, drafting environmental impact statements, and taking other measures that Robinson has long been a part of.

“I’ve been working with the faculty at our Pleasantville campus to organize the Pocantico River Watershed Conservancy,” he said, 12 days before Superstorm Sandy made landfall in New Jersey. “How should it be inter-managed to protect the downstream communities from flooding? It’s not a question of if; it’s only a question of when. We need to get ready for the ‘retreat from the coasts,’ moving infrastructure inland. If you have a road or a pipeline or a buffer right along a coastal area and you don’t help adapt where the river water can go, then you’re going to end up having storms cause a lot of property damage. We cannot save the Hudson River unless we better save the tributaries of the Hudson. We need to take the experiences we have around the world and begin actually solving our local problems. And then we have to share that with similarly situated people all over the world.”

About Seidenberg School student Logan Romm, keystroke biometrics researcher:

“If you’ve logged onto an online retailer’s website months after you last shopped there and found that you were still signed in or if you’ve ever noticed that your email was still logged in after returning from a vacation, then you can well imagine how easy it would be for a cyber bad guy to access your information. But if 27-year-old Logan Romm’s project takes off, those bad guys are going to have to work much harder.

The White Plains resident, who grew up in Rye Brook, has a full-time job as a marketing manager at Verizon, but it was his studies in Internet Technology at Pace University, where he earned his master’s in 2012, that are helping to close these security holes. Along with four other teammates (and dozens of graduate students who have put in time since the project started seven years ago), Romm is studying keystroke biometrics—in other words, identifying people by how they type—and developing its potential for security applications. There is, after all, a surprisingly large amount of data in keystrokes—how quickly people type certain letter combinations, how they scroll, if they prefer the number pad or the numbers above the letters—and, like a fingerprint or an iris, individuals’ typing characteristics are unique to them.

The applications of figuring out how to recognize those unique features are nearly limitless. Authenticating students taking tests online comes to mind. Corporations with proprietary research on their servers and governments with classified documents to protect are always looking for the next step in security. And, as Romm points out, this may be it. After all, passwords can be stolen or guessed, and a single entry often keeps users logged in to sensitive information for hours or even days after they leave the console. But monitoring keystrokes allows ongoing authentication of users, “so, even if an intruder gains access initially, if they are not behaving the way the actual user does then that access could be detected and the unauthorized user’s session could be terminated,” he says. The project’s director, Professor Charles Tappert, has been in touch with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency at the US Department of Defense, although nothing has been finalized.

Romm and his teammates began their work last year, but they were responsible for the meat of the seven-year-old project: collecting typing samples and analyzing them, including the first samples of people working on browsers.

“It’s getting harder and harder to create a secure a password,” Romm says, “but this definitely makes a lot of sense for the next level.”

Read the full article here.

Journal News and Patch.com: Pace University Students Aid Others by Integrating Technology Into Daily Life

Three computer science students in Professor Jean Coppola’s class were featured in articles in The Journal News and on White Plains and Rye Patch.com. (Left: A Kensington Assisted Living resident using an iPad, one of the devices Nicole Morandi and Janelle Wallace teach those living at the home how to navigate. / Nicole Morandi)

Three computer science students in Professor Jean Coppola’s class were featured in articles, about their work helping older adults, in The Journal News and on White Plains and Rye Patch.com.

From The Journal News:

“Through a combination of volunteerism and invention, three students from Pace University have created a way for those with disabilities to comfortably approach technology.

A project for Nicole Morandi, Jennifer Simon and Janelle Wallace’s class, “Computers, Hardware and Troubleshooting” inspired them to give back to people in need.

These women wanted to help those who are physically impaired and decided to do this by making tablet and electronic reading devices more accessible. They replaced the usual metal or plastic stylus pen cover with a soft exterior. The pointers, called “Smile Gear” comes in multiple colors, are flexible and accessible for people with limited hand mobility.

“Not only are they an aid to these individuals, but it will also boost their confidence by putting a smile on their faces and making them feel ‘cool’ about using it,” Simon and Wallace said in a joint statement.

Morandi and Wallace have also been visiting the Kensington Assisted Living in White Plains. Each week they meet with four residents with early to moderate stages of dementia for one-on-one computer lessons. The students have been teaching these elderly individuals how to use their iPads and send emails to relatives.

Another group member, Simon volunteered with Cerebral Palsy of Westchester, N.Y., where she helped to resolve hardware problems for an attendee having troubling using his wheelchair-adapted iPad. Previously, the iPad would easily fall off the chair, but Simon and CPW staff secured the device by adding an additional part. Simon then found and donated the piece so that the problem would be resolved permanently.

Visit their websites to learn more.”

Read the full articles in The Journal News and on Patch.com.

Pace University Students Aid Others by Integrating Technology Into Daily Life – White Plains, NY Patch.

Westchester County Business Journal: MIT scientist to head Pace computer science school

The Westchester County Business Journal, Pleasantville Daily Voice and India Abroad ran articles announcing the arrival of Amar Gupta, the new dean of the Seidenberg School for Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace.

MIT scientist to head Pace computer science school

The Westchester County Business Journal, Pleasantville Daily Voice and India Abroad ran articles announcing the arrival of Amar Gupta, the new dean of the Seidenberg School for Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace.

From the article:

“Amar Gupta, a visiting scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a management and technology professor at the University of Arizona whose focus is on linking technology and entrepreneurship, will be the dean of Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems effective Aug. 15. Gupta has also served as an adviser to the United Nations and World Bank.

Gupta said the locations of Pace, in Westchester and Manhattan, make it uniquely suited to his work. “There’s a proximity to a number of good companies, like IBM, and the chance to develop closer relationships with businesses to find out their needs and train students to meet those needs, to produce the skills and talent that will help them,” said Gupta. “I want to see more joint efforts involving business, government agencies and universities.”

Gupta said dual-degree programs are more important than ever today. “In the old days there were clear demarcations between people in health care, law and information systems,” he said. “But as an example, in the case of law, today there are issues related to law from information technology and information technology plays a growing role in how legal processes are conducted today.”

Health care is one area Gupta pointed to, knowledge of which, along with expertise in computer science, could enable students to be “the change agents of tomorrow.” At the University of Arizona, he developed what has come to be known in academic circles as the 24-Hour Knowledge Factory, a system of working whereby teams in different time zones work on a project during their work day. “When you come back to your project, you feel as if a magic fairy has done work for you while you were asleep,” said Gupta. “It’s like a relay race.”

He talked about how this might be applied to health care. “If an accident takes place at night in the U.S., X-rays can be taken somewhere nearby but read by someone working daytime hours in another country. Or in Australia, in a similar situation, it comes to us for a doctor here to see,” he said. Technology makes this possible, he said, and eliminates the need for shift work, which has been linked to health problems.

This system of working can be applied to many different types of situations, he said, and “allows a project to be completed more quickly. Also, there is an international feel to what is developed and, depending on what the project is, it will be of greater interest to potential buyers around the world.”

Gupta also developed technology, on which he holds a patent, to allow for precise readings of handwritten information on bank checks. He said it was only widely accepted after 9-11 when planes were grounded and checks could not be processed the way they had been for many years.

Then there is his advisory work. For the World Health Organization, he helped set U.S. guidelines on health infomatics –– information relating to health care and the computerization of it. In the 1980s he worked with the World Bank, in one instance helping develop a financial infrastructure for a Caribbean country that had experienced a lot of bank failures.

His work with major corporations in the early days of personal computers produced some interesting reactions. He recalled that when meeting with executives at IBM and encouraging them to develop their own PC after Apple had come out with its computer, one half-joking response was, “ ‘We’re not in the toy computer business.’ But very soon after that, they came out with their own PC,” said Gupta.

Just as Apple and other PCs brought computerization to the average person, Gupta wants to bring education in computer science to everyone on campus. “My goal is for every student at Pace to take at least one course in computer science.”

Read the original article in on Westfair online.

Also read about Gupta in India Abroad,  India West and the Pleasantville Daily Voice.

NEWS RELEASE: Amar Gupta, Authority on Linking Technology and Entrepreneurship, Named Dean of Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems

Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman announced today that Amar Gupta, Ph.D., the Thomas R. Brown Endowed Professor of Management and Technology at the University of Arizona and a visiting scientist at MIT, has been appointed dean of Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, effective Aug. 15.

Amar Gupta, Authority on Linking Technology and Entrepreneurship, Named Dean of Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems

Splitting his time between the University of Arizona and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Gupta has been an interdisciplinary innovator throughout his career, performing breakthrough research, teaching a wide variety of subjects, and working with such diverse organizations as IBM and the United Nations

NEW YORK, July 9, 2012 – Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman announced today that Amar Gupta, Ph.D., the Thomas R. Brown Endowed Professor of Management and Technology at the University of Arizona and a visiting scientist at MIT, has been appointed dean of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, effective Aug. 15.

“Pace is delighted to welcome such an outstanding scholar and leader to Seidenberg at a time when computer science and information systems are becoming ever more central to the university’s historic mission of Opportunitas, preparing young people with the intellectual and practical skills they need to succeed in this world,” Friedman said.

“Today, this means educating all of our students to achieve mastery in the use of technology and a deep understanding of technology’s impact across the professions,” he added. “A distinguished scholar and practitioner, Dr. Gupta will provide vital expertise to the entire Pace community while leading the Seidenberg School in exciting new directions.”

While serving as an endowed professor in the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Gupta had been initiating and nurturing new research, collaborative teaching methods, and other interdisciplinary programs that enable students to receive two graduate degrees and a certificate in entrepreneurship. He was also the founder of the Nexus of Entrepreneurship and Technology Initiative, where he developed what is dubbed the 24-Hour Knowledge Factory. This project involves teams based in three continents who work during the day in their respective countries to collectively provide round-the-clock operations for knowledge-based work. In addition to working on these ventures, he is affiliated with a large number of departments at the University of Arizona: computer science, entrepreneurship, management and organizations, public health, law, pharmacy, and Latin American studies.

At MIT, in Cambridge, Mass., he managed and secured funding for major research projects. He served as the founding co-director of the Productivity from Information Technology, or “PROFIT,” Initiative at the Sloan School of Management. He also directed the Research Program on Communications Policy and acted as associate director of MIT’s International Financial Services Research Center, where he developed a patented approach for highly accurate readings of handwritten information on bank checks.

“The Seidenberg School provides tremendous opportunities for developing new interdisciplinary courses and programs geared to the needs of students in all the schools of Pace University,” Gupta said.

“As one of the premier university-based schools in the tri-state area focusing on both computer science and information technology, it provides an outstanding foundation to launch new teaching, research, and entrepreneurial endeavors with leading organizations in the United States and abroad,” he added. “I look forward to working closely with colleagues and students in different schools at Pace to develop new cross-campus endeavors that address the challenges and opportunities of the global knowledge economy.”

Gupta’s innovative work in that global knowledge economy also extends beyond the halls of academia.

He has served as an adviser to the World Bank, IBM and Citibank, as well as to United Nations organizations that include the World Health Organization, the United Nations Development Programme, and the United Nations Industrial Development Organization.  He was one of the founders of Visual Communications Network Inc., which developed pioneering PC-based presentation software, and served as its chief scientist and vice president.

At Seidenberg, Gupta will succeed Constance A. Knapp, Ph.D., who has been interim dean since 2008. After the transition is made, she will return to teaching at the school.

“Pace provides a wide diversity of schools and programs,” Gupta said. “I want to work with these schools so that the students who graduate from them have all the knowledge they need to use information technology. We are living in an increasingly global society in which this technology has an ever increasing role to play.”

Born in Nadiad, India, Gupta received his undergraduate degree in 1974 in electrical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur. In 1980, he received a graduate degree from the Sloan School at MIT. That same year, he also received a doctorate focusing on the discipline of Decision Support Systems for research conducted at IIT, Delhi, and MIT. He worked at MIT for 25 years on diverse educational endeavors and created the pioneering course in global outsourcing. Last year, he was voted Outstanding Faculty Member of the Year by his Eller College students in Arizona.

Throughout his career in science and technology, Gupta has been more associated with business–oriented projects rather than with pure scientific research. That has been strictly by design.

“I really think the opportunities are in the application of computer science in different disciplines,” Gupta said. “I view computer science and information systems to be enabling technologies and processes, the value of which is derived from the way they are applied in disciplines like banking, manufacturing, health care, commerce, and the law.”

Gupta has written or edited 12 books, and is author of more than 70 research papers. The father of two, he and his wife, Poonam, have been splitting their time between residences in Massachusetts and Arizona.

About Pace

For 105 years, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Media contact: Michael A. Oricchio, Pace University, 212-346-1117, moricchio@pace.edu

 

WABC TV: How senior citizens are using the iPad | 7online.com

Dr. Jay Adlersberg interviewed Seidenberg professor Jean Coppola for WABC’s Eyewitness News on her work teaching technology to older adults.

From the WABC TV website:

The technology revolution is not just for kids. It’s for their parents and even their grandparents. In one local nursing home, residents are getting a taste of wider access to the world around them using a handful of iPads.

With hundreds of thousands of apps, it’s opening the eyes and the minds of older people who might think that technology has passed them by.

Sandy Shulman, 72, is playing hangman in the sports category on the iPad. She lives at the Jewish Home Lifecare nursing home in the Bronx, where residents are becoming part of the iPad revolution. The staff started it off by showing around their personal iPads.

“The initial response was so positive and enthusiastic, and with the support of the administration, we bought our own iPads,” Merri Buckstone, of Jewish Home Lifecare, said.

“It’s accessible to so many things that you never knew existed,” Lillian Haber, 87, said.

Such as Google Maps with the iPad hooked to a widescreen TV. A few taps and the iPad takes them back, right back home.

For Robert grant, it’s all about his football.

“You just push the button so you can see the game, and it pops up,” he said.

Right now, there are only 8 iPads for eight hundred residents.

The staff here at the nursing home tells me that at times, the residents can become passive and uninvolved. The iPad reanimates them.

They shop online and together plan a Mother’s Day lunch.

We used Skype on the iPad to hear a touching story about a 93 year old, who got an iPad from her daughter.

“She grabbed me the other day and she said, ‘Dr. Coppola, my family asked me opinions. Now they ask me questions. They respect me in a different way,'” Jean Coppola, PhD at Pace University, said.

And respect an active mind, no matter how old.

“If you still have the capacity to think, why shouldn’t there be a learning process with it?” Haber said.

Why not indeed. The program at Jewish Home Lifecare is only eight months old. Despite how much each device can expand an older person’s world, there’s only one iPad for every one hundred seniors. But it’s a start, as Merri Buckstone told me, to bringing fun into each person’s life.

View the video here:

How senior citizens are using the iPad | 7online.com.

LA Times: Grandma on Facebook? Sure, seniors say as they learn computers

In the second article in two months in the LA Times, Professor Jean Coppola’s technology program for seniors is featured.
(Photo: Rosemary Nickola works on her computer with her dog, Delilah, on her lap in her New York apartment in February. At that time, Nickola was struggling with technology, but this week she earned a certificate after completing a computer course. Credit – Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times / April 30, 2012.)

Two months ago, Rosemary Nickola struggled to find her email, couldn’t tell the difference between spam messages and genuine communication, and had no idea what Facebook was.

“Spacebook?! What’s spacebook?” she replied when Pace University student Alice Simmons asked her back in February if she was familiar with Facebook, the social networking site.

But on Monday, Nickola held a certificate of achievement in her hands, having completed a computer course that is bringing together the 70-, 80- and 90-something crowd with university students in a program that is disproving the idea that technology is best left to the young.

We first wrote about the program, created by Pace University professor Jean Coppola, in early March, days after the latest session had begun. Nickola was one of dozens of senior citizens at the Hallmark assisted living facility in Manhattan who had signed up for what Coppola calls the “gerontechnology program.” Each senior was paired with a student from nearby Pace University for several weeks of one-on-one tutoring. Another course took place at a senior center in Westchester County, north of New York City.

Monday was graduation day for the Hallmark crowd, where computer students were awarded their diplomas in a room festooned with balloons and lined with tables overloaded with brownies, cookies and other goodies provided by the young tutors. One by one, the graduates walked — some leaning on canes or walkers — to a podium to receive their diplomas and say a few words.

“I just want to thank these lovely children for bringing me back to life,” said Nickola, who briefly dropped the course in frustration after her first tutoring session. Back then, she had trouble with her Internet connection and battled to master the computer that her son had set up in her Hallmark apartment.

But Nickola, a petite 84-year-old with snowy white curls and wide blue eyes, said she resumed the course to shake off the loneliness that has engulfed her since her husband’s death in 2008.

“It took a while, but this is waking me up,” said Nickola as her young tutor, Rose Koron, with bangs dyed a pale blue, stood at her side. It was a sentiment echoed by several of the senior graduates, who spoke of the isolation of being elderly and trying to keep up with a tech-savvy world that rarely appreciates the limitations that come with age.

Coppola said the course fills a need that will grow as baby boomers age, as people live longer and as technology becomes more prevalent in such everyday matters as shopping and communication.

“The baby boomers this year just started turning 65,” said Coppola, adding that baby boomers today don’t necessarily want to spend their time in group activities if they can be chatting on Skype to distant friends and lov

via Grandma on Facebook? Sure, seniors say as they learn computers – latimes.com.

NEWS ADVISORY: Piracy, Liberty and the Internet Panel Discussion at Pace April 30

The Internet provides a seemingly unlimited supply of information and entertainment. While most people support both free flowing information and protection of intellectual property, bills in the House and Senate, commonly known as SOPA and PIPA, have become controversial leading to heated debate. Pace University will hold a panel discussion on April 30 at 5:00pm at One Pace Plaza in the Student Union with experts from both sides debating the issue.

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

PIRACY, LIBERTY AND THE INTERNET PANEL DISCUSSION AT PACE UNIVERSITY APRIL 30TH  

NEW YORK, NY, April 23, 2012 – The Internet provides a seemingly unlimited supply of information and entertainment.  While most people support both free flowing information and protection of intellectual property, bills in the House and Senate, commonly known as SOPA and PIPA, have become controversial leading to heated debate. Pace University will hold a panel discussion on April 30 at 5:00pm at One Pace Plaza in the Student Union with experts from both sides debating the issue.

WHAT: SOPA and PIPA Panel Discussion, with a balance of experts in favor and against. Pace computer science professor and department chair Darren Hayes will moderate.

WHEN: Monday, April 30, 2012 5:00-6:30pm.

WHERE: Pace University, One Pace Plaza, NY, NY, Student Union.

WHO: Panelists include Thomas M. Dailey, Verizon Corporation; Stanley Pierre-Louis, Viacom Inc.; Stephanie Furgang Adwar, Furgang and Adwar, L.L.P.; and Jim Mahoney, American Association of Independent Music (A2IM).

The event is free and open to the public. Media admission by press pass. Check-in will begin at 4:30pm. For more information contact Michael D’Angelo, Criminal Justice Society President, at Md72618n@pace.edu or Pace criminal justice professor Susan Herman at sherman2@pace.edu or 212-346-1829.

This event was organized by students from Pace’s Criminal Justice Society and is co-sponsored by three schools at Pace – the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems and the Lubin School of Business.

Background: The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) is a United States bill in the House introduced by U.S. Representative Lamar S. Smith (R-TX) to fight online trafficking of copyrighted intellectual property and counterfeit goods. The bill would allow legal action ordering advertising networks and payment processors to stop conducting business with infringing websites, stop search engines from linking to such sites and requiring Internet service providers to block access to the sites. The law would include unauthorized streaming of copyrighted content, imposing a maximum penalty of five years in prison. The PROTECT IP Act (PIPA) is a similar bill in the U.S. Senate.

Proponents of the legislation claim it will protect intellectual property and revenue and that it is necessary for enforcement of copyright laws, especially against foreign websites. Opponents state the proposed legislation threatens free speech, is censorship of the Web and violates the First Amendment.

Panelists

Thomas M. Dailey, Vice President and Deputy General Counsel, Verizon Corporation

Thomas Dailey is Vice President and Deputy General Counsel of Verizon where he is chief counsel to Verizon’s Global Strategy organization.  Dailey serves as lead Internet counsel responsible for developing Verizon’s U.S. and global Internet policies and practices in areas including anti-piracy, content regulation, data protection, security, online safety and privacy.  He oversees the legal team responsible for the acquisition of programming content for Verizon’s FiOS TV and multi-platform content delivery services.

Dailey is the Chair of the Center for Copyright Information, the organization created by the memorandum of understanding announced in 2011 between movie and music copyright owners and major U.S. Internet service providers. He also serves as chairman emeritus and is a member of the board of directors of the U.S. Internet Service Provider Association.  Dailey has testified multiple times before the U.S. Congress and various state legislatures on Internet safety, security and anti-piracy issues, including most recently before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee regarding the Protect IP Act, and he is a frequent panelist on Internet issues internationally.

Stanley Pierre-Louis, Vice President and Associate General Counsel Intellectual Property and Content Protection, Viacom Inc.

Stanley Pierre-Louis is Vice President and Associate General Counsel for Intellectual Property and Content Protection at Viacom Inc.  He is responsible for developing strategies to protect digital content, managing major intellectual property litigation and leading other IP-related legal initiatives for Viacom and its brands, which include MTV, VH1, Nickelodeon, Comedy Central, Country Music Television, Spike TV, TV Land, LOGO, BET, and Paramount Pictures.

Prior to joining Viacom, Pierre-Louis was co-chair of the Entertainment and Media Law Group at Kaye Scholer L.L.P., concentrating on intellectual property counseling and litigation. Pierre-Louis previously was Senior Vice President for Legal Affairs at the Recording Industry Association of America, where he led several copyright litigations, including against MP3.com, Napster and Aimster as well as the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case MGM Studios v. Grokster, which resulted in favor of the film and music industries.

Pierre-Louis is a graduate of Clark University and earned his J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School, where he served on the Board of Editors of the University of Chicago Law Review.  He currently serves on several boards and legal committees, including on the Board of Directors of the Lincoln Center Institute for the Arts in Education and on the Visiting Committee of the University of Chicago Department of Music.

Stephanie Furgang Adwar, Founding Partner, Furgang and Adwar, L.L.P.

Stephanie Furgang Adwar is a founding partner of Furgang and Adwar, L.L.P. concentrating in entertainment, trademark, copyright and unfair competition law. Adwar represents clients in the entertainment field including recording labels, musicians, film companies, screenwriters, producers, TV personalities, actors, comedians, authors and TV production companies.

Adwar lectures on entertainment law at New York University (NYU). She has lectured for The Learning Annex, the 92nd Street Y, the American Bar Association – Forum on Entertainment and Sports Law, Diversafest (Dfest) Music Festival, Composer Expo East, Cutting Edge Music Festival, and elsewhere. Adwar has appeared on ABC News “Nightline” and has been quoted in other news media as an expert in entertainment, copyright and trademark law.

She serves on the Advisory Board of the International Music Festival Conference. She is a member of: the Recording Academy, Entertainment Law Initiative/Grammy Foundation, New York State Bar Association (Entertainment and Sports Law Committee), Rockland County Bar Association, New York Women in Film and Television, and the American Film Institute. She serves on the board of the International Music Festival Conference (IMFCON) and for The Colleagues Theatre Company. She is a graduate of Yeshiva University, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law and has a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Film and Television Production from NYU.

Jim Mahoney, Vice President, American Association of Independent Music (A2IM)

Jim Mahoney is Vice President of the American Association of Independent Music (A2IM; www.a2im.org) a non-profit trade organization representing U.S. independent music companies.  He has spent nearly 20 years working in senior management capacities entirely within the independent music sector.  Prior to joining A2IM in 2007, Mahoney served a seven year stint as president of Fat Beats, a tastemaker hip-hop company that operated a music label, a wholesale distribution company, and several retail locations. Earlier in his career, Mahoney held posts as senior director of urban product development at Roadrunner Records and national director of marketing and promotions at Profile Records.

About Pace University: For 105 years Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

 

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The Journal News: Teachers-in-training go Digital at Pace

Pace is one of 10 universities in the country that are putting its students in front of digital classes connected to the “Teach Live” laboratory at the University of Central Florida in Orlando.

Gary Stern from The Journal News visited Pace teacher education classes to learn about and report on a new teaching tool – avatars in a new program, TeachLivE.

From the article in The Journal News:

Until recently, teachers-in-training at Pace University in Pleasantville did not get to step in front of a class until their senior year. They learned the theories behind curriculum and instruction without having to face the unpredictable and sometimes unruly element of classroom life: students.

But recently, 19-year-old sophomore Charles Link got up in front of a small class of jumpy and easily distracted seventh-graders to teach a basic lesson on the states of matter. When he explained how boiling water turns to steam or gas, the class giggled.

“When you said gas, I was just doing a demonstration,” one student, Marcus, said. More chuckles.

Link ignored the remark — as so many middle-school teachers have before him — and went on with his lesson. It was a taste of the real world for him, even though his students were not of flesh and blood.

They were avatars.

Pace is one of 10 universities in the country that are putting its students in front of digital classes connected to the “Teach Live” laboratory at the University of Central Florida in Orlando.

Education majors at Pace teach to five digital avatars who appear on an interactive board and are controlled and voiced by actors in Orlando wearing “motion capture” suits, not unlike those used to create digital movie characters. The avatars — Marcus, Maria, Vince, Francis and never-stop-talking Monique — have distinct personalities that are supposed to represent real adolescent behaviors.

Read the rest of the article at lohud.com.